Latest & greatest articles for Shock Index

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Top results for Shock Index

1. Shock index as a predictor of hospital admission and inpatient mortality in a US national database of emergency departments

Shock index as a predictor of hospital admission and inpatient mortality in a US national database of emergency departments The shock index (SI), defined as the ratio of the heart rate (HR) to the systolic blood pressure (BP), is used as a prognostic tool in trauma and in specific disease states. However, there is scarcity of data about the utility of the SI in the general emergency department (ED)population. Our goal was to use a large national database of EDs in the United States (US

2019 EvidenceUpdates

2. Is Shock Index a Valid Predictor of Mortality in Emergency Department Patients With Hypertension, Diabetes, High Age, or Receipt of beta- or Calcium Channel Blockers? (PubMed)

Is Shock Index a Valid Predictor of Mortality in Emergency Department Patients With Hypertension, Diabetes, High Age, or Receipt of beta- or Calcium Channel Blockers? Shock index is a widely reported tool to identify patients at risk for circulatory collapse. We hypothesize that old age, diabetes, hypertension, and β- or calcium channel blockers weaken the association between shock index and mortality.This was a cohort study of all first-time emergency department (ED) visits between 1995 (...) and 2011 (n=111,019). We examined whether age 65 years or older, diabetes, hypertension, and use of β- or calcium channel blockers modified the association between shock index and 30-day mortality.The 30-day mortality was 3.0%. For all patients, with shock index less than 0.7 as reference, a shock index of 0.7 to 1 had an adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 2.9 (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.7 to 3.2) for 30-day mortality, whereas shock index greater than or equal to 1 had an OR of 10.5 (95% CI 9.3 to 11.7

2015 EvidenceUpdates

3. Usefulness of the Admission Shock Index for Predicting Short-Term Outcomes in Patients With ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction (PubMed)

Usefulness of the Admission Shock Index for Predicting Short-Term Outcomes in Patients With ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction Current risk scores of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) need sophisticated algorithm and were limited for bedside use. Our study aimed to evaluate the usefulness of admission shock index (SI) for predicting the short-term outcomes in patients with STEMI. Included were 7,187 consecutive patients with STEMI. The admission SI was defined (...) of admission SI for predicting 7- and 30-day all-cause mortality was 0.701 and 0.686, respectively, compared with 0.744 and 0.738 from the Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction risk score. In conclusion, admission SI, an easily calculated index at first contact, may be a useful predictor for short-term outcomes especially for acute phase outcomes in patients with STEMI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

2014 EvidenceUpdates

4. A simple 5-point scoring system, NaURSE (Na+, Urea, Respiratory Rate and Shock Index in the Elderly), predicts in-hospital mortality in oldest old (PubMed)

A simple 5-point scoring system, NaURSE (Na+, Urea, Respiratory Rate and Shock Index in the Elderly), predicts in-hospital mortality in oldest old the mortality is high in acutely ill oldest old patients. Understanding the prognostic factors which influence mortality will help clinicians make appropriate management decisions.we analysed prospective mortality audit data (November 2008 to January 2009) to identify variables associated with in-patient mortality in oldest old. We selected those (...) and 13.8% died as in-patients. Variables (cut-off values) found to be significantly associated with in-patient mortality were admission sodium (>145 mmol/l), urea (≥14 mmol/l), respiratory rate (>20/min) and shock index (>1.0): creating a 5-point score (NaURSE: NaURS in the Elderly). The crude mortality rates were 9.5, 19.9, 34.4, 66.7, and 100% for scores 0, 1, 2, 3 and 4, respectively. Using the cut-off point of ≥2, the NaURSE score has a specificity of 87% (83.1-90.3) and sensitivity of 39% (28.5

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2014 EvidenceUpdates

5. The shock index and the simplified PESI for identification of low-risk patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PubMed)

The shock index and the simplified PESI for identification of low-risk patients with acute pulmonary embolism We compared the test characteristics of the shock index (SI) and the simplified pulmonary embolism severity index (sPESI) for predicting 30-day outcomes in a cohort of 1,206 patients with objectively confirmed pulmonary embolism (PE). The primary outcome of the study was all-cause mortality. The secondary outcome was nonfatal symptomatic recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE

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2011 EvidenceUpdates

6. Prognostic value of the shock index along with transthoracic echocardiography in risk stratification of patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PubMed)

Prognostic value of the shock index along with transthoracic echocardiography in risk stratification of patients with acute pulmonary embolism The initial clinical presentation and echocardiography have key roles in risk stratification of patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE). To assess the value of shock index and echocardiographic abnormalities as predictors of in-hospital complications and mortality, echocardiographic features of 159 patients diagnosed with acute PE were reviewed (...) . A shock index > or =1, independent of echocardiographic findings, was associated with increased in-hospital mortality. Regardless of shock index, moderate to severe right ventricular (RV) hypokinesis and a ratio of RV to left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic diameter >1 was significantly associated with in-hospital mortality and demonstrated the best predictive values for short-term outcomes. The sensitivity and negative predictive value of diastolic LV impairment (E/A wave <1), RV hypokinesis, RV/LV >1

2008 EvidenceUpdates