Latest & greatest articles for Serum Magnesium

The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you wanted the latest trusted evidence on Serum Magnesium or other clinical topics then use Trip today.

This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on Serum Magnesium and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

What is Trip?

Trip is a clinical search engine designed to allow users to quickly and easily find and use high-quality research evidence to support their practice and/or care.

Trip has been online since 1997 and in that time has developed into the internet’s premier source of evidence-based content. Our motto is ‘Find evidence fast’ and this is something we aim to deliver for every single search.

As well as research evidence we also allow clinicians to search across other content types including images, videos, patient information leaflets, educational courses and news.

For further information on Trip click on any of the questions/sections on the left-hand side of this page. But if you still have questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com

Top results for Serum Magnesium

1. Oral Magnesium Supplementation in Chronic Kidney Disease Stages 3 and 4: Efficacy, Safety, and Effect on Serum Calcification Propensity—A Prospective Randomized Double-Blinded Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial Full Text available with Trip Pro

Oral Magnesium Supplementation in Chronic Kidney Disease Stages 3 and 4: Efficacy, Safety, and Effect on Serum Calcification Propensity—A Prospective Randomized Double-Blinded Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Recent evidence suggests that increases in both serum and intracellular magnesium (Mg) can slow or even prevent the development of vascular calcification seen in CKD. Serum calcification (...) propensity (T50) is a novel functional test, which is associated with all-cause mortality in CKD and measures the ability of serum to delay the formation of crystalline nanoparticles. Theoretically, increasing serum Mg should improve T50 and thereby reduce the propensity towards ectopic calcification.We conducted a randomized placebo-controlled double-blinded clinical trial to investigate the safety of 2 different doses of oral Mg supplementation in subjects with CKD stages 3 and 4 as well

2016 Kidney international reports Controlled trial quality: predicted high

2. Elevation of serum magnesium may improve clinical outcome after aneursymal subarachnoid haemorrhage

Elevation of serum magnesium may improve clinical outcome after aneursymal subarachnoid haemorrhage BestBets: Elevation of serum magnesium may improve clinical outcome after aneursymal subarachnoid haemorrhage Elevation of serum magnesium may improve clinical outcome after aneursymal subarachnoid haemorrhage Report By: Daniel Horner - ST4 Emergency Medicine / Critical Care Search checked by Craig Ferguson - SpR Emergency Medicine Institution: Manchester Royal Infirmary Date Submitted: 1st May (...) 2010 Date Completed: 27th January 2011 Last Modified: 27th January 2011 Status: Green (complete) Three Part Question In a patient presenting with [aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage] does [early elevation of serum magnesium by administration of intravenous magnesium sulphate] lead to a reduction in [subsequent vasospasm incidence, morbidity or mortality rates] Clinical Scenario A 40 year old female attends the emergency department as a standby call. Her partner gives you a history of acute

2011 BestBETS

3. The effect of magnesium supplementation on blood pressure: a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials

The effect of magnesium supplementation on blood pressure: a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials The effect of magnesium supplementation on blood pressure: a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials The effect of magnesium supplementation on blood pressure: a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials Jee S H, Miller E R, Guallar E, Singh V K, Appel L J, Klag M J Authors' objectives The objectives were to determine whether magnesium supplementation reduces blood-pressure (BP (...) are required. Bibliographic details Jee S H, Miller E R, Guallar E, Singh V K, Appel L J, Klag M J. The effect of magnesium supplementation on blood pressure: a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials. American Journal of Hypertension 2002; 15(8): 691-696 PubMedID Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by NLM MeSH Adult; Aged; Analysis of Variance; Blood Pressure /drug effects; Confidence Intervals; Dose-Response Relationship, Drug; Double-Blind Method; Female; Humans; Hypertension /prevention

2002 DARE.

4. Dietary magnesium intake and blood pressure: a qualitative overview of the observational studies

Dietary magnesium intake and blood pressure: a qualitative overview of the observational studies Dietary magnesium intake and blood pressure: a qualitative overview of the observational studies Dietary magnesium intake and blood pressure: a qualitative overview of the observational studies Mizushima S, Cappuccio FP, Nichols R, Elliott P Authors' objectives To re-assess the evidence from observational studies relating dietary magnesium intake to blood pressure (BP) in the light of recent reports (...) on this question. Searching MEDLINE (January 1966 to December 1995), BIDS-EMBASE (January 1980 to December 1995). Keywords searched for: magnesium, blood pressure and hypertension. Bibliographies of identified studies searched for further references and experts in the field contacted for further references. Papers in all languages were included. Study selection Study designs of evaluations included in the review Observational studies relating dietary intake of magnesium to BP. Specific interventions included

1998 DARE.

5. Reduction in blood pressure with a low sodium, high potassium, high magnesium salt in older subjects with mild to moderate hypertension. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Reduction in blood pressure with a low sodium, high potassium, high magnesium salt in older subjects with mild to moderate hypertension. To examine the effect of a reduced sodium and increased potassium and magnesium intake on blood pressure.Randomised double blind placebo controlled trial.General population of a suburb of Rotterdam.100 men and women between 55 and 75 years of age with untreated mild to moderate hypertension.During 24 weeks the intervention group received a mineral salt (sodium (...) : potassium: magnesium 8:6:1) and foods prepared with the mineral salt. Controls received common salt and foods.Change in blood pressure.Complete follow up was achieved for 97 of the 100 randomised subjects. Systolic blood pressure (mean of measurements at weeks 8, 16, and 24) fell by 7.6 mm Hg (95% confidence interval 4.0 to 11.2) and diastolic blood pressure by 3.3 mm Hg (0.8 to 5.8) in the mineral salt group compared with the controls, with a 28% decrease in urinary sodium excretion and a 22% increase

1994 BMJ Controlled trial quality: predicted high

6. Red blood cell magnesium and chronic fatigue syndrome. (Abstract)

Red blood cell magnesium and chronic fatigue syndrome. The hypotheses that patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) have low red blood cell magnesium and that magnesium treatment would improve the wellbeing of such patients were tested in a case-control study and a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, respectively. In the case-control study, 20 patients with CFS had lower red cell magnesium concentrations than did 20 healthy control subjects matched for age, sex, and social (...) class (difference 0.1 mmol/l, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.05 to 0.15). In the clinical trial, 32 patients with CFS were randomly allocated either to intramuscular magnesium sulphate every week for 6 weeks (15 patients) or to placebo (17). Patients treated with magnesium claimed to have improved energy levels, better emotional state, and less pain, as judged by changes in the Nottingham health profile. 12 of the 15 treated patients said that they had benefited from treatment, and in 7 patients

1991 Lancet Controlled trial quality: predicted high