Latest & greatest articles for Scleritis

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Top results for Scleritis

1. Tectonic corneal lamellar grafting for surgically-induced necrotizing scleritis after strabismus surgery: Case report & literature review (Full text)

Tectonic corneal lamellar grafting for surgically-induced necrotizing scleritis after strabismus surgery: Case report & literature review To report the first case of infectious surgically-induced necrotizing scleritis following strabismus surgery which was treated successfully with a tectonic corneal graft.We report a case of surgically-induced necrotizing scleritis after strabismus surgery in a 61-year-old gentleman with gout and a subconjunctival abscess. Surgical drainage (...) with aggressive local and systemic treatment, tectonic lamellar keratoplasty provides good therapeutic and tectonic results for scleral necrosis after strabismus surgery. This case also demonstrates the importance of screening for associated systemic risk factors in any patient with scleritis for appropriate, targeted therapy.

2018 American journal of ophthalmology case reports PubMed

2. Combination nivolumab- and cabiralizumab-associated acute bilateral anterior and posterior scleritis and anterior uveitis (Full text)

Combination nivolumab- and cabiralizumab-associated acute bilateral anterior and posterior scleritis and anterior uveitis To report on a case of uveitis and scleritis resulting as an immune-mediated side effect of cancer immunotherapy with nivolumab and cabiralizumab.Bilateral anterior nongranulomatous anterior uveitis and bilateral diffuse anterior and posterior scleritis occurred following the use of combination cancer immunotherapy. The uveitis and scleritis resolved following temporary

2018 American journal of ophthalmology case reports PubMed

3. Nocardial scleritis: A case report and a suggested algorithm for disease management based on a literature review (Full text)

Nocardial scleritis: A case report and a suggested algorithm for disease management based on a literature review To report a case of nocardial scleritis and to propose a logical treatment algorithm based on a literature review.It is important to suspect a nocardial infection when evaluating anterior unilateral scleritis accompanied by multiple purulent or necrotic abscesses, especially in male patients with a history of chronic ocular pain and redness, trauma inflicted by organic materials (...) data on a total of 43 eyes with nocardial scleritis. Our proposed algorithm may afford a useful understanding of this sight-threatening disease, facilitating easier and faster diagnosis and management.

2018 American journal of ophthalmology case reports PubMed

4. Anterior infectious necrotizing scleritis secondary to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection following intravitreal ranibizumab injection (Full text)

Anterior infectious necrotizing scleritis secondary to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection following intravitreal ranibizumab injection To report the occurrence and management of severe infectious scleritis in a 75 year-old woman following intravitreal ranibizumab injection.A 75 year-old monocular woman receiving monthly intravitreal ranibizumab injection for wet age related macular degeneration in the left eye presented with severe dull pain, decreased vision, and scleral melt with discharge 2 (...) after two weeks of intravenous, oral and, topical antibiotics.To our knowledge, this is the first case of anterior infectious necrotizing scleritis secondary to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection following intravitreal ranibizumab injection. Clinicians performing intravitreal injections should have a high index of suspicion for iatrogenic infections including scleritis and endophthalmitis, as these infections require aggressive topical and systemic antibiotics as well as possible hospitalization.

2016 American journal of ophthalmology case reports PubMed

5. Unilateral surgically induced Necrotizing Scleritis after trabeculectomy with Ologen in a patient with pigmentary glaucoma (Full text)

Unilateral surgically induced Necrotizing Scleritis after trabeculectomy with Ologen in a patient with pigmentary glaucoma In this report we record the first surgically induced Necrotizing Scleritis case related to trabeculectomy with the use of Ologen Collagen Matrix Implant.Surgically induced Necrotizing Scleritis is a rare pathological entity that complicates ocular (sclera) surgery.Prompt management of surgically induced Necrotizing Scleritis related to trabeculectomy with the use of Ologen

2016 American journal of ophthalmology case reports PubMed

6. Chemotherapy-induced anterior necrotising scleritis: A case report (Full text)

Chemotherapy-induced anterior necrotising scleritis: A case report We describe a case of anterior necrotising scleritis secondary to Gemcitabine and Carboplatin chemotherapy agents in a patient with metastatic breast cancer, which has not been previously reported.A 50-year-old lady with recurrent metastatic breast cancer presented with unilateral subconjunctival haemorrhage secondary to severe thrombocytopenia eight days following palliative chemotherapy in the form of Gemcitabine (...) and Carboplatin. Twelve days following the initial presentation, the subconjunctival haemorrhage had resolved, however there was evidence of anterior necrotising scleritis with anterior chamber reaction and hypotony with choroidal effusion. This resolved with three days of intravenous Methylprednisolone along with topical steroids and the area of necrosis remained stable.Due to the chronological order of events, we infer a Gemcitabine and Carboplatin-induced anterior necrotising scleritis, which has not been

2016 American journal of ophthalmology case reports PubMed