Latest & greatest articles for Relaxation Technique

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Top results for Relaxation Technique

1. Mood, food and stress: a systematic review of the effectiveness of relaxation techniques including hypnotherapy and meditation, in the treatment of obesity

Mood, food and stress: a systematic review of the effectiveness of relaxation techniques including hypnotherapy and meditation, in the treatment of obesity Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content

2019 PROSPERO

2. Relaxation techniques for pain management in labour. (PubMed)

Relaxation techniques for pain management in labour. Many women would like to avoid pharmacological or invasive methods of pain management in labour and this may contribute to the popularity of complementary methods of pain management. This review examined currently available evidence on the use of relaxation therapies for pain management in labour. This is an update of a review first published in 2011.To examine the effects of mind-body relaxation techniques for pain management in labour (...) ), and reference lists of retrieved studies.Randomised controlled trials (including quasi randomised and cluster trials) comparing relaxation methods with standard care, no treatment, other non-pharmacological forms of pain management in labour or placebo.Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and risk of bias, extracted data and checked them for accuracy. We attempted to contact study authors for additional information. We assessed evidence quality with GRADE methodology.This review

2018 Cochrane

3. Evaluation of the effect of Benson's relaxation technique on pain and quality of life of haemodialysis patients: A randomized controlled trial (PubMed)

Evaluation of the effect of Benson's relaxation technique on pain and quality of life of haemodialysis patients: A randomized controlled trial Haemodialysis patients may suffer from pain and impairment of quality of life. Some complementary interventions, such as relaxation therapy, might affect the pain and quality of life. The present study aimed to identify the effectiveness of Benson's relaxation technique in relieving pain and improving the quality of life in haemodialysis patients.The (...) study was a randomized controlled trial.The data were collected in two haemodialysis units affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. A total of 86 haemodialysis patients were randomly assigned to either the intervention (receiving Benson's relaxation technique) or the control group (routine care) from 2011 to 2012.The patients in the intervention groups listened to the audiotape of relaxation technique twice a day each time for 20min for eight weeks.The pain numeric rating scale

2014 EvidenceUpdates

4. Relaxation techniques have some benefit in depression

Relaxation techniques have some benefit in depression PEARLS Practical Evidence About Real Life Situations PEARLS are succinct summaries of Cochrane Systematic Reviews for primary care practitioners. They are funded by the New Zealand Guidelines Group. PEARLS provide guidance on whether a treatment is effective or ineffective. PEARLS are prepared as an educational resource and do not replace clinician judgement in the management of individual cases. View PEARLS online (...) at: • www.cochraneprimarycare.org Relaxation techniques have some benefit in depression Clinical question How effective are relaxation techniques for depression? Bottom line Relaxation techniques were better than wait-list, no treatment or minimal treatment, but not as effective as psychological therapies like cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). Relaxation techniques reduced self-rated depressive symptoms at the end of treatment and at follow-up several months later but data on clinician-rated depressive symptoms were less

2008 Cochrane PEARLS

5. Relaxation techniques for acute pain management: a systematic review

Relaxation techniques for acute pain management: a systematic review Relaxation techniques for acute pain management: a systematic review Relaxation techniques for acute pain management: a systematic review Seers K, Carroll D Authors' objectives To document the effectiveness of relaxation techniques, when used alone for the management of acute pain, after surgery and during procedures. Searching The following databases were searched: MEDLINE from 1966 to March 1996; PsycLIT from 1974 to March (...) included in the review Evaluations of relaxation strategies used alone and not in combination with other interventions, such as cognitive behaviour therapy or imagery, were eligible. Relaxation techniques included the following: modified Jacobson method; Flaherty and Fitzpatrick jaw relaxation; relaxation tape; tape with structured breathing, muscle relaxation and pleasant imagery; progressive muscle relaxation with cognitive relaxation; pleasant memory, jaw relaxation and breathing techniques

1998 DARE.

6. Relaxation technique and postoperative pain in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. (PubMed)

Relaxation technique and postoperative pain in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. A two-group pretest and posttest quasi-experimental design was used to determine the effectiveness of a slow, deep-breathing relaxation technique in relieving postoperative pain after coronary artery bypass graft surgery. A convenience sample of 29 subjects was divided into an experimental group (n = 15), who received relaxation training on the evening before surgery and performed the technique after surgery (...) , and a control group (n = 14), who did not receive relaxation training. Analysis of variance was used to analyze the data. Significant decreases were demonstrated as a result of relaxation, in blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate, and report of pain on the visual descriptor scale. No significant differences were seen in analgesic use or visual analogue scale scores. Eleven subjects (73.3%) said the technique was helpful in their pain management. All experimental subjects stated that the relaxation

1990 Heart & lung : the journal of critical care