Latest & greatest articles for Refractive Error

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Top results for Refractive Error

1. Optical correction of refractive error for preventing and treating eye symptoms in computer users. (PubMed)

Optical correction of refractive error for preventing and treating eye symptoms in computer users. Computer users frequently complain about problems with seeing and functioning of the eyes. Asthenopia is a term generally used to describe symptoms related to (prolonged) use of the eyes like ocular fatigue, headache, pain or aching around the eyes, and burning and itchiness of the eyelids. The prevalence of asthenopia during or after work on a computer ranges from 46.3% to 68.5%. Uncorrected (...) or under-corrected refractive error can contribute to the development of asthenopia. A refractive error is an error in the focusing of light by the eye and can lead to reduced visual acuity. There are various possibilities for optical correction of refractive errors including eyeglasses, contact lenses and refractive surgery.To examine the evidence on the effectiveness, safety and applicability of optical correction of refractive error for reducing and preventing eye symptoms in computer users.We

2018 Cochrane

2. Mechanisms of Corneal Pain and Implications for Postoperative Pain After Laser Correction of Refractive Errors (PubMed)

Mechanisms of Corneal Pain and Implications for Postoperative Pain After Laser Correction of Refractive Errors The cornea is the target of most surgeries for refractive disorders, as myopia. It is estimated that almost 1 million patients undergo corneal refractive surgery each year in the United States. Refractive surgery includes photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) that produces intense postoperative pain. This review presents the main pain mechanisms behind PRK-related pain and the available (...) steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, systemic analgesics, cold balanced saline solution, topical anesthetic, gabapentin, and morphine to treat postoperative pain in PRK.The percentage of responders has seldom been reported, and few studies allow for the formal calculation of the number necessary to treat. Postoperative intense pain after PRK laser surgery remains the main challenge to its widespread use for the correction of refractive errors.

2016 EvidenceUpdates

3. Correction of refractive errors of the eye in adults ? part 3: organisation and legal framework of extramural surgery centres

Correction of refractive errors of the eye in adults ? part 3: organisation and legal framework of extramural surgery centres Correction of refractive errors of the eye in adults – part 3: organisation and legal framework of extramural surgery centres Correction of refractive errors of the eye in adults – part 3: organisation and legal framework of extramural surgery centres Vinck I, Paulus D Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member (...) of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Vinck I, Paulus D. Correction of refractive errors of the eye in adults – part 3: organisation and legal framework of extramural surgery centres. Brussels: Belgian Health Care Knowledge Centre (KCE). KCE Reports 225. 2014 Final publication URL Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by CRD MeSH Delivery of Health Care; Refractive Errorss Language Published English Country of organisation Belgium

2014 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

4. Correction of refractive errors of the eye in adults ? Part 2: laser surgery and intraocular lenses

Correction of refractive errors of the eye in adults ? Part 2: laser surgery and intraocular lenses Correction of refractive errors of the eye in adults – Part 2: laser surgery and intraocular lenses Correction of refractive errors of the eye in adults – Part 2: laser surgery and intraocular lenses Obyn C, Smit Y, Post P, Kohn L, Defourny N, Christiaens W, Paulus D Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation (...) of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Obyn C, Smit Y, Post P, Kohn L, Defourny N, Christiaens W, Paulus D. Correction of refractive errors of the eye in adults – Part 2: laser surgery and intraocular lenses. Brussels: Belgian Health Care Knowledge Centre (KCE). KCE Reports 215. 2013 Final publication URL Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by CRD MeSH Keratectomy, Subepithelial, Laser-Assisted; Laser Therapy; Lenses, Intraocular; Photorefractive Keratectomy

2013 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

5. Correction of refractive errors of the eye in adults ? Part 1: Perceptions and experiences

Correction of refractive errors of the eye in adults ? Part 1: Perceptions and experiences Correction of refractive errors of the eye in adults – Part 1: Perceptions and experiences Correction of refractive errors of the eye in adults – Part 1: Perceptions and experiences Christiaens W, Kohn L, Obyn C, De Winter L, Gussé S, Defourny N, De Laet C, Paulus D Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation (...) of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Christiaens W, Kohn L, Obyn C, De Winter L, Gussé S, Defourny N, De Laet C, Paulus D. Correction of refractive errors of the eye in adults – Part 1: Perceptions and experiences. Brussels: Belgian Health Care Knowledge Centre (KCE). KCE Reports 202. 2013 Final publication URL Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by CRD MeSH Humans; Refractive Errors; Refractive Surgical Procedures Language Published English Country

2013 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

6. Self correction of refractive error among young people in rural China: results of cross sectional investigation. (PubMed)

Self correction of refractive error among young people in rural China: results of cross sectional investigation. To compare outcomes between adjustable spectacles and conventional methods for refraction in young people.Cross sectional study.Rural southern China.648 young people aged 12-18 (mean 14.9 (SD 0.98)), with uncorrected visual acuity ≤ 6/12 in either eye.All participants underwent self refraction without cycloplegia (paralysis of near focusing ability with topical eye drops), automated (...) or subjective refraction, acuity was excellent in nearly all these young people with inadequately corrected refractive error at baseline. Inaccurate power was less common with self refraction than automated refraction. Self refraction could decrease the requirement for scarce trained personnel, expensive devices, and cycloplegia in children's vision programmes in rural China.

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2011 BMJ

7. Laser correction of refractive error following non-refractive ophthalmic surgery (IPG385)

Laser correction of refractive error following non-refractive ophthalmic surgery (IPG385) Overview | Laser correction of refractive error following non-refractive ophthalmic surgery | Guidance | NICE Laser correction of refractive error following non-refractive ophthalmic surgery Interventional procedures guidance [IPG385] Published date: March 2011 Share Save Guidance The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) has issued full guidance to the NHS in England, Wales (...) , Scotland and Northern Ireland on Laser correction of refractive error following non-refractive ophthalmic surgery. Description Refractive errors include common conditions such as myopia (short sightedness) and hyperopia (long sightedness) that impede the accuracy of vision without spectacles or contact lenses. Laser surgery aims to establish visual accuracy by changing the shape of the cornea (the clear outer layer at the front of the eye), so that light rays are more precisely directed onto the retina

2011 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Interventional Procedures

8. Intraocular lens insertion for correction of refractive error, with preservation of the natural lens (IPG289)

Intraocular lens insertion for correction of refractive error, with preservation of the natural lens (IPG289) Overview | Intraocular lens insertion for correction of refractive error, with preservation of the natural lens | Guidance | NICE Intraocular lens insertion for correction of refractive error, with preservation of the natural lens Interventional procedures guidance [IPG289] Published date: February 2009 Share Save Guidance The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE (...) ) has issued full guidance to the NHS in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland on intraocular lens insertion for correction of refractive error, with preservation of the natural lens. Description Short-sightedness is the inability to see clearly at a distance. Eyesight can usually be corrected by wearing spectacles or contact lenses. Insertion of a clear plastic lens in front of the existing lens is a procedure that aims to improve vision in short-sightedness. and for this guidance. Your

2009 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Interventional Procedures

9. Screening for refractive error and fitting with spectacles in rural and urban India: cost-effectiveness

Screening for refractive error and fitting with spectacles in rural and urban India: cost-effectiveness Screening for refractive error and fitting with spectacles in rural and urban India: cost-effectiveness Screening for refractive error and fitting with spectacles in rural and urban India: cost-effectiveness Frick KD, Riva-Clement L, Shankar MB Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief (...) summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. CRD summary This study examined the cost-effectiveness of two screening programmes for refractive error, which were school-based and primary eye care, in urban and rural areas of India. At the cost-effectiveness threshold of the gross domestic product, urban school-based screening was highly cost-effective and rural school-based screening

2009 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

10. Refractive errors and refractive surgery.

Refractive errors and refractive surgery. Guidelines and Measures | Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality HHS.gov Search ahrq.gov Search ahrq.gov Menu Topics A - Z Healthcare Delivery Latest available findings on quality of and access to health care Searchable database of AHRQ Grants, Working Papers & HHS Recovery Act Projects AHRQ Projects funded by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Trust Fund You are here Guidelines and Measures Funding for the National Guideline Clearinghouse (NGC

2008 American Academy of Ophthalmology

11. Corneal implants for the correction of refractive error (IPG225)

Corneal implants for the correction of refractive error (IPG225) Overview | Corneal implants for the correction of refractive error | Guidance | NICE Corneal implants for the correction of refractive error Interventional procedures guidance [IPG225] Published date: July 2007 Share Save Guidance The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) has issued full guidance to the NHS in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland on corneal implants for the correction of refractive (...) error. Description Short-sightedness is the inability to see clearly at a distance. Eyesight can usually be corrected by wearing spectacles or contact lenses. The insertion of clear plastic implants into the cornea is an interventional procedure aiming to restore eyesight in short-sightedness. and for this guidance. Your responsibility This guidance represents the view of NICE, arrived at after careful consideration of the evidence available. When exercising their judgement, healthcare professionals

2007 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Interventional Procedures

12. Laser eye surgery for the correction of refractive errors - early assessment briefs (Alert)

Laser eye surgery for the correction of refractive errors - early assessment briefs (Alert) Laser eye surgery for the correction of refractive errors - early assessment briefs (Alert) Laser eye surgery for the correction of refractive errors - early assessment briefs (Alert) Swedish Council on Technology Assessment in Health Care Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has (...) been made for the HTA database. Citation Swedish Council on Technology Assessment in Health Care. Laser eye surgery for the correction of refractive errors - early assessment briefs (Alert) Stockholm: The Swedish Council on Health Technology Assessment (SBU). SBU Alert report no 2007-04. 2007 Authors' objectives Primary questions: What improvements in visual acuity can patients expect following refractive surgery? How are other measures of visual quality affected? What complications appear, how

2007 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

13. Laser eye surgery for refractive errors. (PubMed)

Laser eye surgery for refractive errors. Several laser and non-laser refractive surgical procedures have been used to modify the shape of the cornea and correct myopia, hyperopia, astigmatism, and presbyopia. Introduction of the excimer laser to reshape the cornea has resulted in remarkable developments in the correction of these refractive errors. Combined with other advanced ophthalmological instruments, laser refractive eye surgery has resulted in a substantial rise in the safety, efficacy (...) , and predictability of surgical outcomes. Despite these advances, certain limitations and complications persist. In this review, we describe the history, preoperative assessment, surgical techniques, outcomes, and complications of laser refractive surgery.

2006 Lancet

14. Photorefractive (laser) surgery for the correction of refractive errors (IPG164)

Photorefractive (laser) surgery for the correction of refractive errors (IPG164) Overview | Photorefractive (laser) surgery for the correction of refractive errors | Guidance | NICE Photorefractive (laser) surgery for the correction of refractive errors Interventional procedures guidance [IPG164] Published date: March 2006 Share Save Guidance The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) has issued full guidance to the NHS in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland (...) on photorefractive (laser) surgery for the correction of refractive error. It replaces the previous guidance on laser in situ keratomileusis for the treatment of refractive errors (Interventional Procedures Guidance no. 102, December 2004), following consideration of a systematic review of LASIK and LASEK. Description Refractive error includes myopia, hyperopia, astigmatism and presbyopia; these are usually corrected by wearing spectacles or contact lenses. Modifying the shape of the cornea can reduce myopia

2006 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Interventional Procedures

15. Photorefractive (laser) surgery for the correction of refractive errors

Photorefractive (laser) surgery for the correction of refractive errors Photorefractive (laser) surgery for the correction of refractive errors Photorefractive (laser) surgery for the correction of refractive errors National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation National Institute for Health and Clinical (...) Excellence. Photorefractive (laser) surgery for the correction of refractive errors. London: National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE). Interventional Procedure Guidance 164. 2006 Authors' objectives This study aims to assess the current evidence on photorefractive (laser) surgery for the correction of refractive errors. This document replaces previous guidance on laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) (NICE Interventional Procedure Guidance no. 102). Authors' conclusions 1 Guidance 1.1

2006 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

16. Laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) for the treatment of refractive errors (IPG102)

Laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) for the treatment of refractive errors (IPG102) Laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) for the treatment of refractive errors | Guidance | NICE Laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) for the treatment of refractive errors Interventional procedures guidance [IPG102] Published date: December 2004 Guidance This guidance has been replaced by . Explore © NICE [year]. All rights reserved. Subject to .

2004 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Interventional Procedures

17. Laser in situ keratomileusis for the treatment of refractive errors

Laser in situ keratomileusis for the treatment of refractive errors Laser in situ keratomileusis for the treatment of refractive errors Laser in situ keratomileusis for the treatment of refractive errors National Institute for Clinical Excellence Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation National Institute for Clinical Excellence. Laser in situ (...) keratomileusis for the treatment of refractive errors. London: National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) 2004: 2 Authors' objectives This study aims to assess the current evidence on laser in situ keratomileusis for the treatment of refractive errors. Authors' conclusions 1.1 Current evidence on laser in situ keratomileusis for the treatment of refractive errors suggests that it is efficacious in selected patients with mild or moderate myopia. Evidence is weaker for its efficacy in patients

2004 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

18. Lasers in sight. Laser correction of refractive errors

Lasers in sight. Laser correction of refractive errors Lasers in sight. Laser correction of refractive errors Lasers in sight. Laser correction of refractive errors Health Council of the Netherlands: Standing Committee on Medicine Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Health Council of the Netherlands: Standing Committee (...) on Medicine. Lasers in sight. Laser correction of refractive errors. Hague: Health Council of the Netherlands Gezondheidsraad (GR) 1993: 50 Authors' objectives In pursuance of questions raised in parliament, on request of the State Secretary of Health, Welfare and Cultural Affairs to inform him about the state of science, its implications for practice and central regulation, if necessary. Authors' conclusions Excimer laser correction of refractive errors has not yet progressed beyond the experimental

1993 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.