Latest & greatest articles for Q Fever

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Top results for Q Fever

1. Cross-sectional study of brucellosis and Q fever in Thailand among livestock in two districts at the Thai-Cambodian border, Sa Kaeo province (PubMed)

Cross-sectional study of brucellosis and Q fever in Thailand among livestock in two districts at the Thai-Cambodian border, Sa Kaeo province Brucellosis and Q fever impart high morbidity in humans and economic losses among livestock worldwide. However their prevalence is still not fully known in Thailand. We conducted a sero-survey of brucellosis and Q fever in beef, dairy cattle, goat, and sheep herds from Thai communities at the border with Cambodia, a cross-border trading center. Serum (...) samples were tested for brucellosis and Q fever by antibody-based tests at the National Institute of Animal Health, Thailand. We surveyed a total of 520 individuals from 143 herds. Brucellosis herd-level seroprevalence for beef cattle and small ruminants (goats and sheep) was 2.6% (3/117) and 13.3% (2/15) respectively. Q fever herd-level seroprevalence for beef cattle, dairy cattle, and small ruminants was 4.3% (5/117), 27.3% (3/11) and 33.3% (5/15) respectively. This study identified a significant

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2018 One health

2. Q fever in an endemic region of North Queensland, Australia: A 10 year review (PubMed)

Q fever in an endemic region of North Queensland, Australia: A 10 year review Q fever is a zoonotic infection caused by Coxiella burnetii. Endemic Q fever has long been recognised in north Queensland, with north Queensland previously acknowledged to have the highest rate of notification in Australia. In this retrospective study, we reviewed the demographics and exposure of patients diagnosed with Q fever in an endemic region of north Queensland, to identify trends and exposure factors (...) for the acquisition of Q fever.A retrospective study looking at patients in the region that had tested positive for Q fever by case ascertainment between 2004 and 2014. This involved both a chart review and the completion of a patient questionnaire targeting demographics, clinical presentation, risk factors and outcomes.There were 101 patients with a positive Q fever serology and/or PCR that were identified in the region of north Queensland that was studied, between 2004 and 2014. The cohort was residents

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2017 One health

4. Human Q fever incidence is associated to spatiotemporal environmental conditions (PubMed)

Human Q fever incidence is associated to spatiotemporal environmental conditions Airborne pathogenic transmission from sources to humans is characterised by atmospheric dispersion and influence of environmental conditions on deposition and reaerosolisation. We applied a One Health approach using human, veterinary and environmental data regarding the 2009 epidemic in The Netherlands, and investigated whether observed human Q fever incidence rates were correlated to environmental risk factors. We (...) concentration was the most important predictor variable (positively correlated to incidence rate), followed by vegetation density (negatively). The other variables were also important, but to a less extent. High erosion sensitive soils and the land-use fractions "city" and "forest" were positively correlated. Soil moisture and land-use "open nature" were negatively associated. The geographical prediction map identified the largest Q fever outbreak areas. The hazard map identified highest hazards

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2016 One health

5. Q fever: risk of transmission via blood or other body material

Q fever: risk of transmission via blood or other body material Q fever: risk of transmission via blood or other body material Q fever: risk of transmission via blood or other body material Health Council of the Netherlands, Gezondheidsraad Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Health Council of the Netherlands, Gezondheidsraad. Q fever: risk (...) of transmission via blood or other body material. The Hague: Health Council of the Netherlands/Gezondheidsraad (GR). 2011/15E. 2011 Authors' conclusions At various points in this advisory report, the Committee notes there is a (relative) lack of data, not only on the potential transmission of Q fever via blood transfusion or body materials, but also regarding more basic questions. With regard to the latter, the Committee refers to the diagnosis and treatment of (primarily chronic) Q fever and the results

2011 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

6. A review of the efficacy of human Q fever vaccine registered in Australia

A review of the efficacy of human Q fever vaccine registered in Australia A review of the efficacy of human Q fever vaccine registered in Australia A review of the efficacy of human Q fever vaccine registered in Australia Chiu CK, Durrheim DN CRD summary This review assessed the efficacy of the human Q fever vaccine registered in Australia. The authors concluded that, despite study limitations, the vaccine had considerable protective benefit in high-risk environments. Poor reporting, lack (...) of formal validity assessment and the non-randomised nature of much evidence meant that, although the conclusions reflected the results of the review, their reliability was unclear. Authors' objectives To assess the efficacy of the human Q fever vaccine registered in Australia (formalin-inactivated Henzerling strain phase I) in humans. Searching MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched. Search terms were reported. Search dates were not reported. References were checked. Only studies published in English were

2007 DARE.

7. Q fever. (PubMed)

Q fever. Q fever is a zoonosis with many manifestations. The most common clinical presentation is an influenza-like illness with varying degrees of pneumonia and hepatitis. Although acute disease is usually self-limiting, people do occasionally die from this condition. Endocarditis is the most frequent chronic presentation. Although Q fever is widespread, practitioner awareness and clinical manifestations vary from region to region. Geographically limited studies suggest that chronic fatigue

2006 Lancet

8. An economic evaluation of increased uptake in Q fever vaccination among meat and agricultural industry workers following implementation of the National Q Fever Management Program

An economic evaluation of increased uptake in Q fever vaccination among meat and agricultural industry workers following implementation of the National Q Fever Management Program An economic evaluation of increased uptake in Q fever vaccination among meat and agricultural industry workers following implementation of the National Q Fever Management Program An economic evaluation of increased uptake in Q fever vaccination among meat and agricultural industry workers following implementation (...) of the National Q Fever Management Program Kermode M, Yong K, Hurley S, Marmion B Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology The implementation of a National Q Fever Management Program (NQFMP) in order to immunise meat and agricultural

2003 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.