Latest & greatest articles for Pulpitis

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Top results for Pulpitis

1. Antibiotic use for irreversible pulpitis. (PubMed)

Antibiotic use for irreversible pulpitis. Irreversible pulpitis, which is characterised by acute and intense pain, is one of the most frequent reasons that patients attend for emergency dental care. Apart from removal of the tooth, the customary way of relieving the pain of irreversible pulpitis is by drilling into the tooth, removing the inflamed pulp (nerve) and cleaning the root canal. However, a significant number of dentists continue to prescribe antibiotics to stop the pain (...) of bias, illustrates that there is insufficient evidence to determine whether antibiotics reduce pain or not compared to not having antibiotics. The results of this review confirm the necessity for further larger sample and methodologically sound trials that can provide additional evidence as to whether antibiotics, prescribed in the preoperative phase, can affect treatment outcomes for irreversible pulpitis.

2019 Cochrane

2. Comparing the anaesthetic efficacy of articaine with lidocaine in patients with irreversible pulpitis: an umbrella review

Comparing the anaesthetic efficacy of articaine with lidocaine in patients with irreversible pulpitis: an umbrella review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any

2019 PROSPERO

3. Antibiotic use for irreversible pulpitis. (PubMed)

Antibiotic use for irreversible pulpitis. Irreversible pulpitis, which is characterised by acute and intense pain, is one of the most frequent reasons that patients attend for emergency dental care. Apart from removal of the tooth, the customary way of relieving the pain of irreversible pulpitis is by drilling into the tooth, removing the inflamed pulp (nerve) and cleaning the root canal. However, a significant number of dentists continue to prescribe antibiotics to stop the pain (...) outcomes for irreversible pulpitis.

2016 Cochrane

4. Buffered Lidocaine Does Not Improve the Inferior Alveolar Block Success For Mandibular Posterior Teeth With Symptomatic Irreversible Pulpitis

Buffered Lidocaine Does Not Improve the Inferior Alveolar Block Success For Mandibular Posterior Teeth With Symptomatic Irreversible Pulpitis UTCAT2946, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Buffered Lidocaine Does Not Improve the Inferior Alveolar Block Success For Mandibular Posterior Teeth With Symptomatic Irreversible Pulpitis Clinical Question For patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis (...) , is Lidocaine buffered with Sodium Bicarbonate a more successful anesthetic compared to conventional non-buffered Lidocaine when administered as an inferior alveolar nerve block? Clinical Bottom Line Buffered Lidocaine for inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) block does not result in statistically significant increased success rate of IAN block or decrease in injection pain on mandibular posterior teeth with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. Best Evidence (you may view more info by clicking on the PubMed ID link

2015 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

5. Preemptive Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs May Increase the Success Rate of Inferior Alveolar Nerve Blocks in Mandibular Posterior Teeth with Symptomatic Irreversible Pulpitis

Preemptive Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs May Increase the Success Rate of Inferior Alveolar Nerve Blocks in Mandibular Posterior Teeth with Symptomatic Irreversible Pulpitis UTCAT2807, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Preemptive Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs May Increase the Success Rate of Inferior Alveolar Nerve Blocks in Mandibular Posterior Teeth with Symptomatic Irreversible Pulpitis (...) Clinical Question In mandibular posterior teeth with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis, does a preemptive dose of an oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) increase the success rate of an inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) compared to placebo? Clinical Bottom Line For patients with irreversible pulpitis in a mandibular posterior tooth, a single preemptive dose of NSAID may increase the success of IANB compared to placebo. This is supported by a meta-analysis of seven clinical trials

2015 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

6. Articaine (4%) Does Not Improve Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block Success Compared to Lidocaine (2%) for Mandibular Molars with Irreversible Pulpitis

Articaine (4%) Does Not Improve Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block Success Compared to Lidocaine (2%) for Mandibular Molars with Irreversible Pulpitis UTCAT2658, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Articaine (4%) Does Not Improve Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block Success Compared to Lidocaine (2%) for Mandibular Molars with Irreversible Pulpitis Clinical Question For patients with irreversible pulpitis in mandibular (...) molars, is 4% articaine superior to 2% lidocaine in achieving successful anesthesia when administered as an inferior alveolar nerve block? Clinical Bottom Line Administration of 4% articaine as an inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) block does not result in greater anesthesia success compared to 2% lidocaine when providing endodontic treatment to mandibular molars diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis. Best Evidence (you may view more info by clicking on the PubMed ID link) PubMed ID Author / Year Patient

2014 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

7. Supplemental Intraosseous Anesthesia Improves the Success Rate of Inferior Alveolar Nerve Blocks in Molars with Irreversible Pulpitis.

Supplemental Intraosseous Anesthesia Improves the Success Rate of Inferior Alveolar Nerve Blocks in Molars with Irreversible Pulpitis. UTCAT2689, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Supplemental Intraosseous Anesthesia Improves the Success Rate of Inferior Alveolar Nerve Blocks in Molars with Irreversible Pulpitis. Clinical Question In patients receiving treatment for irreversible pulpitis of mandibular (...) molars, does the supplemental intraosseous anesthesia provide a superior clinical success rate compared to an inferior alveolar nerve block alone? Clinical Bottom Line In cases with patients being treated for irreversible pulpitis, a supplemental delivery of local anesthetic by means of intraosseous injection following an initial inferior alveolar nerve block aids in achieving successful pain free treatment. Best Evidence (you may view more info by clicking on the PubMed ID link) PubMed ID Author

2014 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

8. Antibiotic use for irreversible pulpitis. (PubMed)

Antibiotic use for irreversible pulpitis. Irreversible pulpitis, which is characterised by acute and intense pain, is one of the most frequent reasons that patients attend for emergency dental care. Apart from removal of the tooth, the customary way of relieving the pain of irreversible pulpitis is by drilling into the tooth, removing the inflamed pulp (nerve) and cleaning the root canal. However, a significant number of dentists continue to prescribe antibiotics to stop the pain (...) trial assessed as a low risk of bias, illustrates that there is insufficient evidence to determine whether antibiotics reduce pain or not compared to not having antibiotics. The results of this review confirm the necessity for further larger sample and methodologically sound trials that can provide additional evidence as to whether antibiotics, prescribed in the preoperative phase, can affect treatment outcomes for irreversible pulpitis.

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2013 Cochrane

9. Antibiotic use for irreversible pulpitis. (PubMed)

Antibiotic use for irreversible pulpitis. Irreversible pulpitis, which is characterised by acute and intense pain, is one of the most frequent reasons that patients attend for emergency dental care. Apart from removal of the tooth the customary way of relieving the pain of irreversible pulpitis is by drilling into the tooth, removing the inflamed pulp (nerve) and cleaning the root canal. However, a significant minority of dentists continue to prescribe antibiotics to stop the pain (...) of irreversible pulpitis.The objective of this review was to provide reliable evidence regarding the effectiveness of prescribing systemic antibiotics for irreversible pulpitis by comparing clinical outcomes expressed as pain relief.We searched the following databases: Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register and Pain, Palliative Care and Supportive (PaPaS) Care Group Trials Register to 6th September 2004; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) The Cochrane Library Issue 3 2004

2005 Cochrane