Latest & greatest articles for Ptosis

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Top results for Ptosis

1. Types of materials for frontalis sling surgery for congenital ptosis. (Abstract)

Types of materials for frontalis sling surgery for congenital ptosis. Congenital ptosis is a drooping of one or both eyelids at birth, often due to poor development of the levator palpebrae superioris muscle. This can result in amblyopia, astigmatism, and ocular torticollis and therefore may necessitate surgical intervention in early childhood if visual development is compromised. Patients may have varied levels of levator function. Those with moderate to good function may elect to first (...) attempt ptosis repair with external levator advancement or mullerectomy/Fasanella-Servat procedures. For those with poor function, those procedures are less likely to be effective, so they may undergo frontalis sling surgery, in which the tarsal plate is coupled to the frontalis muscle, so that movement of the brow and forehead result in movement of the eyelid. The optimal material to use in this surgery is unknown.To evaluate the comparative effectiveness and safety of various materials used

2019 Cochrane

2. Trigeminal hypertrophic interstitial neuropathy presenting as unilateral proptosis, ptosis, tearing, and facial neuralgia Full Text available with Trip Pro

Trigeminal hypertrophic interstitial neuropathy presenting as unilateral proptosis, ptosis, tearing, and facial neuralgia To show the utility of MRI and histology in diagnosing rare cases of trigeminal hypertrophic interstitial neuropathy (HIN).A 57-year-old African-American woman presented with a 4-year history of right eye proptosis with tearing, headaches, and worsening right-sided trigeminal neuralgia symptoms and jaw pain. HIV and diabetes tests were negative and thyroid function

2018 American journal of ophthalmology case reports

3. Supero-medial reduction mammaplasty: a safe and reliable technique in gigantomastia and severe breast ptosis Full Text available with Trip Pro

Supero-medial reduction mammaplasty: a safe and reliable technique in gigantomastia and severe breast ptosis Reduction mammaplasty in huge breasts poses a great challenge for plastic surgeons. The classic technique is free nipple and areola grafting after breast amputation. This paper is a short technical report of reduction mammoplasty on 40 patients with severe breast ptosis (suprasternal notch to nipple >35 cm) and giganticomastia (anticipated resection of more than 1 kg per breast) were

2018 Electronic physician

4. Orbital, eyelid, and nasopharyngeal silicone oil granuloma presenting as ptosis & pseudo-xanthelasma Full Text available with Trip Pro

Orbital, eyelid, and nasopharyngeal silicone oil granuloma presenting as ptosis & pseudo-xanthelasma To highlight the presentation and management of a patient with eyelid, orbital and nasopharyngeal silicone oil migration through a glaucoma drainage implant presenting as pseudo-xanthelasma and ptosis.A 68-year male presented with unilateral ptosis and presumed xanthelasma. He had a history of glaucoma drainage implant surgery, pseudophakia, and multiple retinal detachment repairs with silicone (...) oil. During ptosis repair it was discovered that his presumed xanthelasma was in fact an eyelid silicone granuloma. Additional work up revealed silicone infiltration of the eyelids, orbits, and nasopharynx, resulting from emulsified silicone oil leakage through his glaucoma valve implant.Silicone oil may emulsify with time, with potential egress via a glaucoma filtration device. Clinicians should be alert for eyelid, orbital and sinonasal findings that may indicate occult migration.

2018 American journal of ophthalmology case reports

5. Isolated left upper eyelid ptosis with pansinusitis and contralateral otitis media in a 9-year-old boy Full Text available with Trip Pro

Isolated left upper eyelid ptosis with pansinusitis and contralateral otitis media in a 9-year-old boy Upper eyelid ptosis has different etiologies in children and adults. In children, the common causes include orbital cellulitis, congenital ptosis, Cranial Nerve (CN) III palsy, and Horner's syndrome. The purpose of this report is to discuss an unusual presentation of ptosis.We describe a case of a 9-year-old boy with left-sided ptosis with no apparent clinical signs of orbital or preseptal (...) infection. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed pansinusitis and contralateral otitis media with direct extension into the superior aspect of the left orbit affecting the levator palpebrae superioris muscle.This finding on imaging disclosed the etiology of an otherwise unexplained case of upper lid ptosis.

2018 American journal of ophthalmology case reports

6. Assessment of ptosis

Assessment of ptosis Assessment of ptosis - Differential diagnosis of symptoms | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Assessment of ptosis Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: June 2018 Summary Blepharoptosis, or ptosis, refers to the drooping or downward displacement of the upper eyelid. The levator muscle, its aponeurosis, and the Muller muscle are responsible for upper eyelid resting position and elevation. When these structures (...) are compromised, the resultant depressed eyelid position can reduce the amount of light entering the eye, thereby degrading visual acuity (VA). In pseudoptosis, aberrant structural relationships of the intact globe, bony, and soft-tissue attachments may cause secondary eyelid abnormalities. Congenital myogenic, acquired aponeurotic, and involutional forms of ptosis represent the most common causes of ptosis among children and adults. Thakker MM, Rubin PA. Mechanisms of acquired blepharoptosis. Ophthalmol Clin

2018 BMJ Best Practice

7. Ptosis after Swimming in the Red Sea. (Abstract)

Ptosis after Swimming in the Red Sea. 26376138 2015 09 29 2015 09 17 1533-4406 373 12 2015 Sep 17 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. IMAGES IN CLINICAL MEDICINE. Ptosis after Swimming in the Red Sea. 1153 10.1056/NEJMicm1411119 Lagrèze Wolf A WA Albert Ludwigs University Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany wolf.lagreze@uniklinik-freiburg.de. Schaber Matthias M eng Case Reports Journal Article United States N Engl J Med 0255562 0028-4793 AIM IM Blepharoptosis etiology pathology Eye

2015 NEJM