Latest & greatest articles for Preseptal Cellulitis

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Top results for Preseptal Cellulitis

1. Varicella zoster causing preseptal cellulitis - uncommon but possible (Full text)

Varicella zoster causing preseptal cellulitis - uncommon but possible Varicella has been known to be a harmless childhood disease. However, it has been reported that severe complications have taken place following Varicella infection, in both immunocompetent, as well as immunocompromised, individuals. Cutaneous complications of Varicella may manifest as preseptal cellulitis, albeit rarely.We present a case of a 4-year-old boy who presented with symptoms and signs of preseptal cellulitis (...) following Varicella infection. He was referred to the otorhinolaryngology team for a nasoendoscopy to rule out sinusitis, in view of the fear that a child presenting with a swollen red eye may be a case of true orbital cellulitis. He was treated successfully with intravenous antibiotics and surgical drainage of the preseptal collection.It is imperative for clinicians to be aware that a simple Varicella infection may lead to cutaneous complications in the pediatric age group, especially in children who

2017 Malaysian family physician : the official journal of the Academy of Family Physicians of Malaysia PubMed

3. Ambulatory intravenous antibiotic therapy for children with preseptal cellulitis

Ambulatory intravenous antibiotic therapy for children with preseptal cellulitis Ambulatory intravenous antibiotic therapy for children with preseptal cellulitis Ambulatory intravenous antibiotic therapy for children with preseptal cellulitis Brugha RE, Abrahamson E Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical (...) assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. CRD summary This study assessed the cost of out-patient care, compared with in-patient care, for children on intravenous antibiotics for preseptal or periorbital cellulitis. The authors concluded that out-patient intravenous antibiotics were safe and cost-effective, compared with in-patient care, for children with preseptal cellulitis. The methods were reasonably well reported, but had some drawbacks, which should be considered when

2013 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

4. Should a child with preseptal periorbital cellulitis be treated with intravenous or oral antibiotics?

Should a child with preseptal periorbital cellulitis be treated with intravenous or oral antibiotics? BestBets: Should a child with preseptal periorbital cellulitis be treated with intravenous or oral antibiotics? Should a child with preseptal periorbital cellulitis be treated with intravenous or oral antibiotics? Report By: Shafic Al-Nammari - Junior Clinical Research Fellow Search checked by Benjamin Roberton / Craig Ferguson - Institution: Moorfields Eye Hospital & St George's Hospital Date (...) Submitted: 17th March 2004 Date Completed: 29th January 2007 Last Modified: 6th December 2006 Status: Green (complete) Three Part Question In [a child with preseptal periorbital cellulitis] are [intravenous antibiotics better than oral antibiotics] at [decreasing the time to recovery and preventing secondary complications]? Clinical Scenario A 5-year-old boy presents to the emergency department with the signs and symptoms of uncomplicated preseptal periorbital cellulitis. There is no obvious precipitant

2007 BestBETS