Latest & greatest articles for Pityriasis Rosea

The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you wanted the latest trusted evidence on Pityriasis Rosea or other clinical topics then use Trip today.

This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on Pityriasis Rosea and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

What is Trip?

Trip is a clinical search engine designed to allow users to quickly and easily find and use high-quality research evidence to support their practice and/or care.

Trip has been online since 1997 and in that time has developed into the internet’s premier source of evidence-based content. Our motto is ‘Find evidence fast’ and this is something we aim to deliver for every single search.

As well as research evidence we also allow clinicians to search across other content types including images, videos, patient information leaflets, educational courses and news.

For further information on Trip click on any of the questions/sections on the left-hand side of this page. But if you still have questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com

Top results for Pityriasis Rosea

1. Pityriasis rosea

Pityriasis rosea Pityriasis rosea - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Pityriasis rosea Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: March 2019 Summary An inflammatory skin disease with unclear aetiology, although an infectious cause has been suggested. Can present in patients of any age but most often in people aged 10 to 35 years. Manifests as an acute, self-limiting, inflammatory eruption characterised (...) by a single larger lesion, the herald patch, followed by eruption of smaller papulosquamous oval lesions. Spontaneous resolution, usually over several weeks, but can persist for up to 5 months. Symptoms treated by topical corticosteroids and/or oral antihistamines, or UV therapy. Definition Pityriasis rosea (PR) is an inflammatory skin condition of uncertain aetiology, although an unknown infectious agent has been suggested. PR manifests as an acute, self-limiting, inflammatory eruption characterised

2019 BMJ Best Practice

3. Pityriasis rosea

Pityriasis rosea Pityriasis rosea - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Pityriasis rosea Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: March 2019 Summary An inflammatory skin disease with unclear aetiology, although an infectious cause has been suggested. Can present in patients of any age but most often in people aged 10 to 35 years. Manifests as an acute, self-limiting, inflammatory eruption characterised (...) by a single larger lesion, the herald patch, followed by eruption of smaller papulosquamous oval lesions. Spontaneous resolution, usually over several weeks, but can persist for up to 5 months. Symptoms treated by topical corticosteroids and/or oral antihistamines, or UV therapy. Definition Pityriasis rosea (PR) is an inflammatory skin condition of uncertain aetiology, although an unknown infectious agent has been suggested. PR manifests as an acute, self-limiting, inflammatory eruption characterised

2017 BMJ Best Practice

4. Pityriasis rosea

Pityriasis rosea Pityriasis rosea - NICE CKS Clinical Knowledge Summaries Share Pityriasis rosea: Summary Pityriasis rosea is a skin rash that is characterized by distinctive scaly, erythematous lesions. It is thought to be a reaction to exposure to infection. Pityriasis rosea mainly affects older children and young adults (commonly between 10 and 35 years of age), and is more common in women than men. The diagnosis of pityriasis rosea is clinical based on the appearance and distribution (...) Secondary syphilis Tinea corporis (ringworm) For most people with pityriasis rosea, no treatment is required. The rash may worsen before it resolves, with new crops of lesions continuing to appear for up to 6 weeks. It will usually settle without treatment within 2–3 months, but may take up to 5 months to disappear. After the rash has disappeared, there may be some hyperpigmentation or hypopigmentation of the affected skin for several months, but there should be no scarring. For people with itch

2016 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

5. Interventions for pityriasis rosea. (PubMed)

Interventions for pityriasis rosea. Pityriasis rosea is a scaly rash that mainly affects young adults. It can be very itchy but most people recover within 2 to 12 weeks.To assess the effects of interventions for pityriasis rosea.We searched the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register (December 2004), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Clinical Trials in The Cochrane Library (Issue 4, 2004), MEDLINE (1966 to January 2005), EMBASE (1976 to January 2005), LILACS (1982 to January 2005 (...) weeks (RR 13.00; 95% CI 1.91 to 88.64). It was also more effective in decreasing the itch score (difference of 3.95 points, 95% CI 3.37 to 4.53). No serious adverse effects were reported for the interventions. Two out of 17 people on oral erythromycin and 1 out of 17 on placebo reported minor gastrointestinal upset.We found inadequate evidence for efficacy for most treatments for pityriasis rosea. Oral erythromycin may be effective in treating the rash and decreasing the itch. However, this result

2007 Cochrane