Latest & greatest articles for Photorefractive Keratectomy

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Top results for Photorefractive Keratectomy

1. Outcomes of photorefractive keratectomy in patients with atypical topography (PubMed)

Outcomes of photorefractive keratectomy in patients with atypical topography Photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) is at risk of serious complications such as corneal ectasia, which can reduce corrected distance visual acuity. The rate of complications of PRK is higher in patients with atypical topography.To determine the outcomes of photorefractive keratectomy in patients with atypical topography.This cross-sectional study was done in 2015 in Shiraz in Iran. We included 85 eyes in this study (...) and -4.20±1.96 diopters in females; thus there was not statistically significant difference (p = 0.435).PRK is a safe and efficient photorefractive surgery and is associated with low complication rate in patients with atypical topography.

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2017 Electronic physician

2. Photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) versus laser assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) for hyperopia correction. (PubMed)

Photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) versus laser assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) for hyperopia correction. Hyperopia, or hypermetropia (also known as long-sightedness or far-sightedness), is the condition where the unaccommodating eye brings parallel light to a focus behind the retina instead of on it. Hyperopia can be corrected with both non-surgical and surgical methods, among them photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) and laser assisted In situ keratomileusis (LASIK). There is uncertainty

2012 Cochrane

3. Photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) versus laser assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) for hyperopia correction. (PubMed)

Photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) versus laser assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) for hyperopia correction. Hyperopia, or hypermetropia (also known as long-sightedness or far-sightedness), is the condition where the unaccommodating eye brings parallel light to a focus behind the retina instead of on it. Hyperopia can be corrected with both non-surgical and surgical methods, among them photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) and laser assisted In situ keratomileusis (LASIK). There is uncertainty

2009 Cochrane

4. Comparison of laser epithelial keratomileusis and photorefractive keratectomy for the correction of myopia: a meta-analysis

Comparison of laser epithelial keratomileusis and photorefractive keratectomy for the correction of myopia: a meta-analysis Comparison of laser epithelial keratomileusis and photorefractive keratectomy for the correction of myopia: a meta-analysis Comparison of laser epithelial keratomileusis and photorefractive keratectomy for the correction of myopia: a meta-analysis Cui M, Chen XM, Lu P CRD summary The review concluded that there was no definitive evidence that laser epithelial (...) keratomileusis (LASEK) was better than photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) for correcting myopia from 0 to -9.0 dioptres. The review had some methodological weaknesses, but the authors’ conclusion is likely to be reliable given the evidence available. Authors' objectives To compare the efficacy, accuracy, safety and side-effects of laser epithelial keratomileusis (LASEK) and photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) for the correction of myopia. Searching PubMed, EMBASE, Chinese Bio-medicine Database and Cochrane

2008 DARE.

5. Photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) versus laser-assisted in-situ keratomileusis (LASIK) for myopia. (PubMed)

Photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) versus laser-assisted in-situ keratomileusis (LASIK) for myopia. Myopia (also known as short-sightedness or near-sightedness) is an ocular condition in which the refractive power of the eye is greater than is required, resulting in light from distant objects being focused in front of the retina instead of directly on it. The two most commonly used surgical techniques to permanently correct myopia are photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) and laser-assisted in-situ

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2006 Cochrane

6. Evaluation of the effectiveness of laser in situ keratomileusis and photorefractive keratectomy for myopia: a meta-analysis

Evaluation of the effectiveness of laser in situ keratomileusis and photorefractive keratectomy for myopia: a meta-analysis Evaluation of the effectiveness of laser in situ keratomileusis and photorefractive keratectomy for myopia: a meta-analysis Evaluation of the effectiveness of laser in situ keratomileusis and photorefractive keratectomy for myopia: a meta-analysis Yang X J, Yan H T, Nakahori Y CRD summary This review assessed the effectiveness of laser in situ keratomileusis (...) and photorefractive keratectomy for correcting myopia. The authors concluded that the two treatments have similar efficacy, predictability, and final visual outcome for the correction of myopia from -1.5 to -15.0 diopter. Subepithelial haze and flap-related complications were associated with different treatments. The conclusions appear reliable, based on the five included trials. Authors' objectives To assess the effectiveness of laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) and photorefractive keratectomy (PRK

2003 DARE.

7. Excimer laser photorefractive keratectomy: the correction of myopia and astigmatism - nonsystematic review

Excimer laser photorefractive keratectomy: the correction of myopia and astigmatism - nonsystematic review Excimer laser photorefractive keratectomy: the correction of myopia and astigmatism - nonsystematic review Excimer laser photorefractive keratectomy: the correction of myopia and astigmatism - nonsystematic review Conseil d'Evaluation des Technologies de la Sante du Quebec Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA (...) . No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Conseil d'Evaluation des Technologies de la Sante du Quebec. Excimer laser photorefractive keratectomy: the correction of myopia and astigmatism - nonsystematic review. Montreal: Conseil d'Evaluation des Technologies de la Sante du Quebec (CETS). CETS 97-5 RE. 1997 Authors' objectives The aim of this technology brief is to discuss the most widespread application of the excimer laser in ophthalmology

1997 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

8. Evaluation of excimer laser for photorefractive keratectomy

Evaluation of excimer laser for photorefractive keratectomy Evaluation of excimer laser for photorefractive keratectomy Evaluation of excimer laser for photorefractive keratectomy Fleurette F, Durieux P, Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Fleurette F, Durieux P,. Evaluation of excimer laser for photorefractive keratectomy (...) studies. The exact incidence of corneal opacity, the main complication of this technique, must be determined. ANDEM recommended a five-year follow-up of all treated patients Other output or dissemination activity: Not covered by health insurers. Project page URL Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by CRD MeSH Keratectomy, Photorefractive, Excimer Laser Language Published French Country of organisation France Address for correspondence 2 avenue du Stade de France, 93218 Saint-Denis La Plaine

1992 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.