Latest & greatest articles for Pharmaceutical Representative

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Top results for Pharmaceutical Representative

1. Ending pharmaceutical sales representatives' access to hospitals and students

Spotlight In the November issue of Prescrire International: Ending pharmaceutical sales representatives' access to hospitals and students FREE DOWNLOAD In-person promotion of drugs to healthcare professionals by pharmaceutical sales representatives, known as pharmaceutical detailing, has been shown to influence doctors' prescribing behaviour. A US study looked at ways to limit this influence. Full text available for free download. Summary A large-scale case-control study has evaluated policies (...) (October 2018) Knowing how to say "No thank you" is crucial (April 2017) Guard against drug companies' influence on healthcare professionals, starting with medical students (June 2013) Student associations drive pharmaceutical companies off campus (July 2016) | | | Prescrire Your change of address has been received and will be processed promptly but will not appear instantaneously Prescrire Your message has been sent

2018 Prescrire

2. Becoming a ‘pharmaceutical person’: Medication use trajectories from age 26 to 38 in a representative birth cohort from Dunedin, New Zealand Full Text available with Trip Pro

Becoming a ‘pharmaceutical person’: Medication use trajectories from age 26 to 38 in a representative birth cohort from Dunedin, New Zealand Despite the abundance of medications available for human consumption, and frequent concerns about increasing medicalization or pharmaceuticalization of everyday life, there is little research investigating medicines-use in young and middle-aged populations and discussing the implications of young people using increasing numbers of medicines (...) and becoming pharmaceutical users over time. We use data from a New Zealand longitudinal study to examine changes in self-reported medication use by a complete birth cohort of young adults. Details of medications taken during the previous two weeks at age 38 are compared to similar data collected at ages 32 and 26, and by gender. Major drug categories are examined. General use profiles and medicine-types are considered in light of our interest in understanding the formation of the young and middle-aging

2017 SSM - population health

3. Prevalence and Correlates of Anti‐Parkinson Drug Use in a Nationally Representative Sample Full Text available with Trip Pro

Prevalence and Correlates of Anti‐Parkinson Drug Use in a Nationally Representative Sample Although numerous prescription drugs are available to treat Parkinson's disease (PD), little is known about national use in clinical practice and which factors may influence variability in care. The objectives of this study were to describe the prevalence of anti-Parkinson drug use among Medicare beneficiaries with PD and to identify demographic and clinical factors associated with drug use.This (...) retrospective study was based on a random sample of annual 5% Medicare Part A and B claims linked with Medicare Part D drug files from 2007 through 2010. The study sample included fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries with continuous stand-alone Part D enrollment who had been diagnosed with PD in the given year. First, any PD drug use and drug use by class (levodopa, dopamine agonist, anticholinerigc, monoamine oxidase B inhibitors, catechol-O-methyltransferase inhibitors, and amantadine) were described

2016 Movement disorders clinical practice

4. HRS/ACC/AHA Expert Consensus Statement on the Use of Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Therapy in Patients Who Are Not Included or Not Well Represented in Clinical Trials Full Text available with Trip Pro

HRS/ACC/AHA Expert Consensus Statement on the Use of Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Therapy in Patients Who Are Not Included or Not Well Represented in Clinical Trials HRS/ACC/AHA Expert Consensus Statement on the Use of Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Therapy in Patients Who Are Not Included or Not Well Represented in Clinical Trials | Circulation Search Hello Guest! Login to your account Email Password Keep me logged in Search March 2019 March 2019 March 2019 March 2019 March (...) 2019 February 2019 February 2019 February 2019 February 2019 January 2019 January 2019 January 2019 January 2019 January 2019 This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Free Access article Share on Jump to Free Access article HRS/ACC/AHA Expert Consensus Statement on the Use of Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Therapy in Patients Who Are Not Included or Not Well Represented in Clinical Trials , MD, FHRS , MD, FHRS , MD , MD , MD, FHRS

2014 American Heart Association

5. Widening access to UK medical education for under-represented socioeconomic groups: modelling the impact of the UKCAT in the 2009 cohort. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Widening access to UK medical education for under-represented socioeconomic groups: modelling the impact of the UKCAT in the 2009 cohort. To determine whether the use of the UK clinical aptitude test (UKCAT) in the medical schools admissions process reduces the relative disadvantage encountered by certain sociodemographic groups.Prospective cohort study.Applicants to 22 UK medical schools in 2009 that were members of the consortium of institutions utilising the UKCAT as a component (...) of their admissions process.8459 applicants (24,844 applications) to UKCAT consortium member medical schools where data were available on advanced qualifications and socioeconomic background.The probability of an application resulting in an offer of a place on a medicine course according to seven educational and sociodemographic variables depending on how the UKCAT was used by the medical school (in borderline cases, as a factor in admissions, or as a threshold).On univariate analysis all educational

2012 BMJ

6. Widening access to medical education for under-represented socioeconomic groups: population based cross sectional analysis of UK data, 2002-6. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Widening access to medical education for under-represented socioeconomic groups: population based cross sectional analysis of UK data, 2002-6. To determine whether new programmes developed to widen access to medicine in the United Kingdom have produced more diverse student populations.Population based cross sectional analysis.31 UK universities that offer medical degrees.34,407 UK medical students admitted to university in 2002-6.Age, sex, socioeconomic status, and ethnicity of students (...) ). There were marked differences in demographics across individual established schools offering both graduate entry and traditional courses.The graduate entry programmes do not seem to have led to significant changes to the socioeconomic profile of the UK medical student population. Foundation programmes have increased the proportion of students from under-represented groups but numbers entering these courses are small.

2011 BMJ

7. Minimal prevalence of authorship misrepresentation among internal medicine residency applicants: do previous estimates of "misrepresentation" represent insufficient case finding?. (Abstract)

Minimal prevalence of authorship misrepresentation among internal medicine residency applicants: do previous estimates of "misrepresentation" represent insufficient case finding?. High rates of authorship misrepresentation have been documented among medical trainees.To assess misrepresentation among internal medicine residency applicants while comparing searches used by previous authors (searches 1 and 2) to a more comprehensive strategy (search 3).Review of 497 residency applications.Two (...) university-based internal medicine residency programs.Search 1 was limited to MEDLINE. Search 2 added Current Contents, Science Citation Index, and BIOSIS and included searching journals by hand. Search 3 added seven other databases and contacts to librarians, editors, and coauthors.224 applicants reported 634 articles; 630 (99%) were verified. The number of applicants with misrepresented citations varied depending on the search used (56 applicants [25%] in search 1 vs. 34 applicants [15%] in search 2 vs

2003 Annals of Internal Medicine

8. Dramaturgical study of meetings between general practitioners and representatives of pharmaceutical companies; Commentary: dramaturgical model gives valuable insight. Full Text available with Trip Pro

aspects of this information. Scene 5 involved a recovery strategy as the representative fought to regain equilibrium. In the final scene, the representative tried to ensure future contacts.Encounters between general practitioners and pharmaceutical representatives follow a consistent format that is implicitly understood by each player. It is naive to suppose that pharmaceutical representatives are passive resources for drug information. General practitioners might benefit from someone who can provide (...) Dramaturgical study of meetings between general practitioners and representatives of pharmaceutical companies; Commentary: dramaturgical model gives valuable insight. To examine the interaction between general practitioners and pharmaceutical company representatives.Qualitative study of 13 consecutive meetings between general practitioner and pharmaceutical representatives. A dramaturgical model was used to inform analysis of the transcribed verbal interactions.Practice in south west England.13

2001 BMJ

9. Effect of restricting contact between pharmaceutical company representatives and internal medicine residents on posttraining attitudes and behavior. (Abstract)

Effect of restricting contact between pharmaceutical company representatives and internal medicine residents on posttraining attitudes and behavior. The long-term effect of policies restricting contact between residents and pharmaceutical company representatives (PCRs) during internal medicine training is unknown. The McMaster University Department of Medicine in Hamilton, Ontario, implemented a policy restricting PCR contact with trainees in 1992, whereas the Department of Medicine (...) at the University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, has no such policy.To determine if the presence of a restrictive policy and the frequency of contact with PCRs during internal medicine training predict attitudes and behavior several years after completion of training.Retrospective analysis of the attitudes and behavior of 3 cohorts of physicians: University of Toronto trainees, prepolicy McMaster trainees, and postpolicy McMaster trainees. Surveys were mailed to 242 former University of Toronto and 57 former

2001 JAMA