Latest & greatest articles for Pharmaceutical Representative

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Top results for Pharmaceutical Representative

1. Ending pharmaceutical sales representatives' access to hospitals and students

Ending pharmaceutical sales representatives' access to hospitals and students Prescrire IN ENGLISH - Spotlight ''Ending pharmaceutical sales representatives' access to hospitals and students'', 1 November 2018 {1} {1} {1} | | > > > Ending pharmaceutical sales representatives' access to hospitals and students Spotlight Every month, the subjects in Prescrire’s Spotlight. 100 most recent :  |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |  (...) Spotlight In the November issue of Prescrire International: Ending pharmaceutical sales representatives' access to hospitals and students FREE DOWNLOAD In-person promotion of drugs to healthcare professionals by pharmaceutical sales representatives, known as pharmaceutical detailing, has been shown to influence doctors' prescribing behaviour. A US study looked at ways to limit this influence. Full text available for free download. Summary A large-scale case-control study has evaluated policies

2018 Prescrire

2. Becoming a ‘pharmaceutical person’: Medication use trajectories from age 26 to 38 in a representative birth cohort from Dunedin, New Zealand (PubMed)

Becoming a ‘pharmaceutical person’: Medication use trajectories from age 26 to 38 in a representative birth cohort from Dunedin, New Zealand Despite the abundance of medications available for human consumption, and frequent concerns about increasing medicalization or pharmaceuticalization of everyday life, there is little research investigating medicines-use in young and middle-aged populations and discussing the implications of young people using increasing numbers of medicines (...) and becoming pharmaceutical users over time. We use data from a New Zealand longitudinal study to examine changes in self-reported medication use by a complete birth cohort of young adults. Details of medications taken during the previous two weeks at age 38 are compared to similar data collected at ages 32 and 26, and by gender. Major drug categories are examined. General use profiles and medicine-types are considered in light of our interest in understanding the formation of the young and middle-aging

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2017 SSM - population health

3. Effect of restricting contact between pharmaceutical company representatives and internal medicine residents on posttraining attitudes and behavior. (PubMed)

Effect of restricting contact between pharmaceutical company representatives and internal medicine residents on posttraining attitudes and behavior. The long-term effect of policies restricting contact between residents and pharmaceutical company representatives (PCRs) during internal medicine training is unknown. The McMaster University Department of Medicine in Hamilton, Ontario, implemented a policy restricting PCR contact with trainees in 1992, whereas the Department of Medicine

2017 JAMA

4. Dramaturgical study of meetings between general practitioners and representatives of pharmaceutical companies; Commentary: dramaturgical model gives valuable insight. (PubMed)

Dramaturgical study of meetings between general practitioners and representatives of pharmaceutical companies; Commentary: dramaturgical model gives valuable insight. To examine the interaction between general practitioners and pharmaceutical company representatives.Qualitative study of 13 consecutive meetings between general practitioner and pharmaceutical representatives. A dramaturgical model was used to inform analysis of the transcribed verbal interactions.Practice in south west England.13 (...) pharmaceutical company representatives and one general practitioner.The encounters were acted out in six scenes. Scene 1 was initiated by the pharmaceutical representative, who acknowledged the relative status of the two players. Scene 2 provided the opportunity for the representative to check the general practitioner's knowledge about the product. Scene 3 was used to propose clinical and cost benefits associated with the product. During scene 4, the general practitioner took centre stage and challenged

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2017 BMJ