Latest & greatest articles for Occlusive Dressing

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Top results for Occlusive Dressing

1. Total Occlusive Ionic Silver-Containing Dressing vs Mupirocin Ointment Application vs Conventional Dressing in Elective Colorectal Surgery: Effect on Incisional Surgical Site Infection (PubMed)

Total Occlusive Ionic Silver-Containing Dressing vs Mupirocin Ointment Application vs Conventional Dressing in Elective Colorectal Surgery: Effect on Incisional Surgical Site Infection Several pre- and intraoperative factors have been associated with incisional surgical site infection (SSI), but little is known about the influence of postoperative wound care and especially, the use of different dressings on incisional SSI. The aim of this study was to compare 3 methods of wound dressings (...) (conventional dressing, silver-containing dressing, and mupirocin ointment dressing) for their ability to prevent SSI, as measured by SSI rates, in patients with colorectal cancer undergoing elective open surgery.A prospective, randomized study was performed. Inclusion criteria were diagnosis of colorectal neoplasms and plans to undergo elective surgery with curative aims. Patients were randomized using a 1:1:1 allocation into 3 groups: patients receiving an ionic silver-containing dressing (ISD) (group 1

2015 EvidenceUpdates

2. Dermabrasion with an occlusive biosynthetic dressing increases rate of wound healing

Dermabrasion with an occlusive biosynthetic dressing increases rate of wound healing "Dermabrasion with an occlusive biosynthetic dressing increases rate of" by Laura Jane Winter < > > > > > Title Author Date of Graduation Summer 8-9-2014 Degree Type Capstone Project Degree Name Master of Science in Physician Assistant Studies Rights . Abstract Background: Deep dermal burns are initially difficult to evaluate. Some of these burns are able to heal spontaneously from the epidermal precursor cells (...) found in hair follicles that were not destroyed by the injury. This type of healing is either slowed considerably or is unable to occur if the burn wound is covered with eschar or granulating surfaces. Leaving this necrotic tissue in place and covering the wound with a skin graft or occlusive dressing will create a closed fluid loculation that can then become infected and destroy viable epidermal cells thus converting a deep partial burn into a full thickness injury. Dermabrasion is a useful

2014 Pacific University EBM Capstone Project

3. Occlusive dressings and gauze dressings did not differ for healing open wounds in surgical patients

Occlusive dressings and gauze dressings did not differ for healing open wounds in surgical patients Occlusive dressings and gauze dressings did not differ for healing open wounds in surgical patientsCommentary | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal (...) accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Occlusive dressings and gauze dressings did not differ for healing open wounds in surgical patientsCommentary Article Text Treatment Occlusive dressings and gauze dressings did not differ

2009 Evidence-Based Nursing

4. Paraffin ointment or mupirocin ointment did not differ from no ointment under moist occlusive dressings on non-contaminated surgical wounds for wound infections

Paraffin ointment or mupirocin ointment did not differ from no ointment under moist occlusive dressings on non-contaminated surgical wounds for wound infections Paraffin ointment or mupirocin ointment did not differ from no ointment under moist occlusive dressings on non-contaminated surgical wounds for wound infections | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time (...) moist occlusive dressings on non-contaminated surgical wounds for wound infections Article Text Treatment Paraffin ointment or mupirocin ointment did not differ from no ointment under moist occlusive dressings on non-contaminated surgical wounds for wound infections Statistics from Altmetric.com Request Permissions If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price

2008 Evidence-Based Nursing

5. Effectiveness of occlusive dressings versus non-occlusive dressings for reducing infections in surgical wounds

Effectiveness of occlusive dressings versus non-occlusive dressings for reducing infections in surgical wounds Effectiveness of occlusive dressings versus non-occlusive dressings for reducing infections in surgical wounds Effectiveness of occlusive dressings versus non-occlusive dressings for reducing infections in surgical wounds Burrows E Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made (...) for the HTA database. Citation Burrows E. Effectiveness of occlusive dressings versus non-occlusive dressings for reducing infections in surgical wounds. Clayton, Victoria: Centre for Clinical Effectiveness (CCE) 2000: 12 Authors' objectives This aim of this report was to assess the effectiveness of occlusive dressings versus non-occlusive dressings for reducing infections in surgical wounds. Authors' conclusions - Three randomised controlled trials met inclusion and exclusion criteria. - No significant

2000 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

6. Cost, efficacy, efficiency and tolerability of collagenase ointment versus hydrocolloid occlusive dressing in the treatment of pressure ulcers: a comparative, randomised, multicentre study

Cost, efficacy, efficiency and tolerability of collagenase ointment versus hydrocolloid occlusive dressing in the treatment of pressure ulcers: a comparative, randomised, multicentre study Cost, efficacy, efficiency and tolerability of collagenase ointment versus hydrocolloid occlusive dressing in the treatment of pressure ulcers: a comparative, randomised, multicentre study Cost, efficacy, efficiency and tolerability of collagenase ointment versus hydrocolloid occlusive dressing (...) technology Collagenase ointment applied once daily in a 1 to 2mm thick layer to the ulcer bed, or hydrocolloid occlusive dressing changed every 3 days in the treatment of patients with pressure ulcer. Type of intervention Treatment. Economic study type Cost-effectiveness analysis. Study population Patients aged over 55 years having had stage III pressure ulcers (characterised by skin disruption, tissue damage and exudate, and subcutaneous cell tissue involvement) for less than 1 year. Patients were

2000 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.