Latest & greatest articles for Mycobacterium Avium Complex

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Top results for Mycobacterium Avium Complex

1. Disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex infections in African HIV patients with autopsy findings: a systematic review

Disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex infections in African HIV patients with autopsy findings: a systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any

2019 PROSPERO

2. Hospital-based antibiotic use in patients with Mycobacterium avium complex (PubMed)

Hospital-based antibiotic use in patients with Mycobacterium avium complex Treatment guidelines exist for pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection, although studies suggest poor concordance in clinician practice. Using a national database including hospital encounters of laboratory-confirmed MAC patients, we sought to characterise US treatment practices. We assessed patients in the Premier Healthcare Database from 2009 to 2013 with two or more MAC-positive cultures or one MAC

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2018 ERJ open research

3. Microbiologic Outcome of Interventions Against Mycobacterium avium Complex Pulmonary Disease: A Systematic Review

Microbiologic Outcome of Interventions Against Mycobacterium avium Complex Pulmonary Disease: A Systematic Review Pulmonary disease (PD) caused by Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) is increasing worldwide. We conducted a systematic review of studies that include microbiologic outcomes to evaluate current macrolide-based treatment regimens.We searched literature published before April 2017 by using the MEDLINE, Cochrane, and Embase databases. Risk of bias in randomized trials was assessed using

2018 EvidenceUpdates

6. Serodiagnosis of Mycobacterium avium-complex pulmonary disease using an enzyme immunoassay kit (PubMed)

Serodiagnosis of Mycobacterium avium-complex pulmonary disease using an enzyme immunoassay kit The diagnosis of Mycobacterium avium-complex pulmonary disease (MAC-PD) and/or its discrimination from pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is sometimes complicated and time consuming.We investigated in a six-institution multicenter study whether a serologic test based on an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) kit was useful for diagnosing MAC-PD and for distinguishing it from other lung diseases.An EIA kit detecting

2008 EvidenceUpdates

7. Successful discontinuation of therapy for disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex infection after effective antiretroviral therapy. (PubMed)

Successful discontinuation of therapy for disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex infection after effective antiretroviral therapy. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is associated with improvement or resolution of several HIV-associated opportunistic infections. Although prophylaxis against disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex infection may be successfully discontinued after a favorable response to HAART, the 1999 guidelines from the U.S. Public Health Service/Infectious (...) Diseases Society of America recommend continuing therapy for disseminated M. avium complex infection, regardless of the response to HAART.To examine the outcome among patients with disseminated M. avium complex infection whose antimycobacterial therapy was discontinued after a favorable response to HAART.Retrospective chart review between May 2000 and May 2001.13 Canadian HIV clinics.52 HIV-infected adults (43 men; mean age, 37.3 years) in whom successful antimycobacterial therapy for disseminated M

2002 Annals of Internal Medicine

8. Discontinuation of prophylaxis for Mycobacterium avium complex disease in HIV-infected patients who have a response to antiretroviral therapy. Terry Beirn Community Programs for Clinical Research on AIDS. (PubMed)

Discontinuation of prophylaxis for Mycobacterium avium complex disease in HIV-infected patients who have a response to antiretroviral therapy. Terry Beirn Community Programs for Clinical Research on AIDS. Several agents are effective in preventing Mycobacterium avium complex disease in patients with advanced human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. However, there is uncertainty about whether prophylaxis should be continued in patients whose CD4+ cell counts have increased substantially (...) with antiviral therapy.We conducted a multicenter, double-blind, randomized trial of treatment with azithromycin (1200 mg weekly) as compared with placebo in HIV-infected patients whose CD4+ cell counts had increased from less than 50 to more than 100 per cubic millimeter in response to antiretroviral therapy. The primary end point was M. avium complex disease or bacterial pneumonia.A total of 520 patients entered the study; the median CD4+ cell count at entry was 230 per cubic millimeter. In 48 percent

2000 NEJM

9. Cost-effectiveness of azithromycin for preventing Mycobacterium avium complex infection in HIV-positive patients in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy

Cost-effectiveness of azithromycin for preventing Mycobacterium avium complex infection in HIV-positive patients in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy Cost-effectiveness of azithromycin for preventing Mycobacterium avium complex infection in HIV-positive patients in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy Cost-effectiveness of azithromycin for preventing Mycobacterium avium complex infection in HIV-positive patients in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy Sendi P (...) P, Craig B A, Meier G, Pfluger D, Gafni A, Opravil M, Battegay M, Bucher H C Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection prophylaxis with azithromycin (1,200 mg per week) in HIV

1999 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

10. The cost-effectiveness of prophylaxis for Mycobacterium avium complex in AIDS

The cost-effectiveness of prophylaxis for Mycobacterium avium complex in AIDS The cost-effectiveness of prophylaxis for Mycobacterium avium complex in AIDS The cost-effectiveness of prophylaxis for Mycobacterium avium complex in AIDS Scharfstein J A, Paltiel A D, Weinstein M C, Seage G R, Losina E, Craven D E, Freedberg K A Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods (...) , the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology Clinical drug regimens in the setting of zidovudine monotherapy and prophylaxis for Mycobacterium Avium Complex (MAC) in patients with AIDS. Type of intervention Treatment, secondary prevention. Economic study type Cost-effectiveness analysis and cost-utility analysis. Study population Hypothetical cohort of 1 million HIV-infected patients at various CD4

1999 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

11. Preventing Mycobacterium avium complex in patients who are using protease inhibitors: a cost-effectiveness analysis

Preventing Mycobacterium avium complex in patients who are using protease inhibitors: a cost-effectiveness analysis Preventing Mycobacterium avium complex in patients who are using protease inhibitors: a cost-effectiveness analysis Preventing Mycobacterium avium complex in patients who are using protease inhibitors: a cost-effectiveness analysis Bayoumi A M, Redelmeier D A Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each (...) abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology Five strategies were compared for the prevention of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease, who were receiving protease inhibitors. The strategies evaluated were: no prophylaxis; azithromycin, 1,200 mg once weekly; clarithromycin, 500 mg twice daily

1998 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

12. Prophylaxis for disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection in patients with AIDS: a cost-effectiveness analysis

Prophylaxis for disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection in patients with AIDS: a cost-effectiveness analysis Prophylaxis for disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection in patients with AIDS: a cost-effectiveness analysis Prophylaxis for disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection in patients with AIDS: a cost-effectiveness analysis Freedberg K A, Cohen C J, Barber T W Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets (...) the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology Prophylaxis for disseminated Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) infection in patients with AIDS: rifabutin (300 mg/day), azithromycin (1200mg/week) and clarithromycin (500 mg twice per day) were compared with no prophylaxis. Type of intervention Treatment; secondary

1997 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

13. A randomized trial of clarithromycin as prophylaxis against disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex infection in patients with advanced acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. (PubMed)

A randomized trial of clarithromycin as prophylaxis against disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex infection in patients with advanced acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Disseminated infection with Mycobacterium avium complex is the most common opportunistic infection in patients with advanced stages of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). We studied the efficacy and safety of prophylactic treatment with clarithromycin, a macrolide antibiotic.We conducted a randomized, placebo (...) -controlled, double-blind study of clarithromycin in patients with AIDS in the United States and Europe. Entry criteria included blood cultures that were negative for M. avium complex, a Karnofsky performance score of 50 or higher, a CD4 cell count of 100 or less per cubic millimeter, and a life expectancy of at least six months.After the first interim analysis, the study was stopped. M. avium complex infection developed in 19 of the 333 patients (6 percent) assigned to clarithromycin and in 53 of the 334

1996 NEJM

14. A comparison of two regimens for the treatment of Mycobacterium avium complex bacteremia in AIDS: rifabutin, ethambutol, and clarithromycin versus rifampin, ethambutol, clofazimine, and ciprofloxacin. Canadian HIV Trials Network Protocol 010 Study Group. (PubMed)

A comparison of two regimens for the treatment of Mycobacterium avium complex bacteremia in AIDS: rifabutin, ethambutol, and clarithromycin versus rifampin, ethambutol, clofazimine, and ciprofloxacin. Canadian HIV Trials Network Protocol 010 Study Group. Bacteremia with the Mycobacterium avium complex is common in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), but the most effective treatment for this infection remains unclear.We randomly assigned 229 patients with AIDS and M (...) . avium complex bacteremia to receive either rifampin (600 mg daily), ethambutol (approximately 15 mg per kilogram of body weight daily), clofazimine (100 mg daily), and ciprofloxacin (750 mg twice daily) (the four-drug group) or rifabutin (600 mg daily), ethambutol (as above), and clarithromycin (1000 mg twice daily) (the three-drug group). In the three-drug group the dose of rifabutin was reduced by half after 125 patients were randomized, because 24 of 63 patients had uveitis.Among 187 patients who

1996 NEJM

15. Prophylaxis against disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex with weekly azithromycin, daily rifabutin, or both. California Collaborative Treatment Group. (PubMed)

Prophylaxis against disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex with weekly azithromycin, daily rifabutin, or both. California Collaborative Treatment Group. Azithromycin is active in treating Mycobacterium avium complex disease, but it has not been evaluated as primary prophylaxis in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Because the drug is concentrated in macrophages and has a long half-life in tissue, there is a rationale for once-weekly dosing.We compared three (...) prophylactic regimens in a multicenter, double-blind, randomized trial involving 693 HIV-infected patients with fewer than 100 CD4 cells per cubic millimeter. The patients were assigned to receive rifabutin (300 mg daily), azithromycin (1200 mg weekly), or both drugs. They were monitored monthly with blood cultures for M. avium complex.In an intention-to-treat analysis, the incidence of disseminated M. avium complex infection at one year was 15.3 percent with rifabutin, 7.6 percent with azithromycin

1996 NEJM

16. Two controlled trials of rifabutin prophylaxis against Mycobacterium avium complex infection in AIDS. (PubMed)

Two controlled trials of rifabutin prophylaxis against Mycobacterium avium complex infection in AIDS. Disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex infection eventually develops in most patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). This infection results in substantial morbidity and reduces survival by about six months.We conducted two randomized, double-blind, multicenter trials of daily prophylactic treatment with either rifabutin (300 mg) or placebo. All the patients had AIDS (...) and CD4 cell counts < or = 200 per cubic millimeter. The primary end point was M. avium complex bacteremia as assessed monthly by blood culture. The secondary end points were signs and symptoms associated with disseminated M. avium complex infection, adverse events, hospitalization, and survival.In the first trial, M. avium complex bacteremia developed in 51 of 298 patients (17 percent) assigned to placebo and 24 of 292 patients (8 percent) assigned to rifabutin (P < 0.001). In the second trial

1993 NEJM