Latest & greatest articles for Malaria Chemoprophylaxis

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Top results for Malaria Chemoprophylaxis

1. Systematic review: Cochrane Review highlights the need for more targeted research on the tolerability of malaria chemoprophylaxis in travellers

Systematic review: Cochrane Review highlights the need for more targeted research on the tolerability of malaria chemoprophylaxis in travellers Cochrane Review highlights the need for more targeted research on the tolerability of malaria chemoprophylaxis in travellers | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please (...) see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Cochrane Review highlights the need for more targeted research on the tolerability of malaria chemoprophylaxis

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2010 Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)

2. Chemoprophylaxis and intermittent treatment for preventing malaria in children. (PubMed)

Chemoprophylaxis and intermittent treatment for preventing malaria in children. Malaria causes repeated illness in children living in endemic areas. Policies of giving antimalarial drugs at regular intervals (prophylaxis or intermittent treatment) are being considered for preschool children.To evaluate prophylaxis and intermittent treatment with antimalarial drugs to prevent malaria in young children living in malaria-endemic areas.We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized (...) Register (August 2007), CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2007, Issue 3), MEDLINE (1966 to August 2007), EMBASE (1974 to August 2007), LILACS (1982 to August 2007), mRCT (February 2007), and reference lists of identified trials. We also contacted researchers.Individually randomized and cluster-randomized controlled trials comparing antimalarial drugs given at regular intervals (prophylaxis or intermittent treatment) with placebo or no drug in children aged one month to six years or less living in a malaria

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2008 Cochrane

3. The efficacy of malaria chemoprophylaxis

The efficacy of malaria chemoprophylaxis The efficacy of malaria chemoprophylaxis The efficacy of malaria chemoprophylaxis Saridi M, Vasiliki P, Saroglou G CRD summary The authors concluded that atovaquone/proguanil, tafenoquine, primaquine were the most effective regimens for malaria chemoprophylaxis, but tafenoquine and primaquine should not be prescribed to individuals with G6PD deficiency. Given the limitations of the review data and concerns about the methodology and reporting (...) , Saroglou G. The efficacy of malaria chemoprophylaxis. Health Science Journal 2008; 2(1): 3-14 Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by CRD MeSH Aminoquinolines /therapeutic use; Antimalarials /therapeutic use; Atovaquone /therapeutic use; Chemoprevention; Communicable Disease Control; Malaria /prevention & Primaquine /therapeutic use; control AccessionNumber 12008105102 Date bibliographic record published 03/02/2009 Date abstract record published 13/01/2010 Record Status This is a critical abstract

2008 DARE.

4. Reimbursement of malaria chemoprophylaxis for travellers from Europe to Sub-Saharan Africa: cost-effectiveness analysis from the perspective of the French national health insurance system

Reimbursement of malaria chemoprophylaxis for travellers from Europe to Sub-Saharan Africa: cost-effectiveness analysis from the perspective of the French national health insurance system Reimbursement of malaria chemoprophylaxis for travellers from Europe to Sub-Saharan Africa: cost-effectiveness analysis from the perspective of the French national health insurance system Reimbursement of malaria chemoprophylaxis for travellers from Europe to Sub-Saharan Africa: cost-effectiveness analysis (...) compared the cost-effectiveness of reimbursing malaria chemoprophylaxis at a rate of 65% against the usual strategy of no reimbursement, for French residents who occasionally travelled to Sub-Saharan Africa. The authors concluded that 65% reimbursement was a cost-effective strategy from the perspective of the French national health insurance system. The analysis had several limitations and the reporting, especially for the effectiveness data, was insufficient. The authors’ conclusions should be treated

2008 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

5. Controversies and misconceptions in malaria chemoprophylaxis for travelers. (PubMed)

Controversies and misconceptions in malaria chemoprophylaxis for travelers. Controversies in malaria prevention arise from the absence of data, conflicting data between different studies, conflicting recommendations, deviation of local practice from scientific data, and varying risk thresholds. Misconceptions about the seriousness of malaria, the tolerability of chemoprophylaxis drugs, and the efficacy and safety of repellents contribute to the controversies.To compare several national (...) guidelines on malaria chemoprophylaxis to identify variations in recommendations. We reviewed studies on tolerability of mefloquine with particular focus on its neuropsychiatric adverse effects and influence on performance. We also describe why most recommended chemoprophylactic regimens fail to prevent relapses of Plasmodium vivax malaria and review available options.We searched scientific publications in MEDLINE via PubMED for relevant articles with a cutoff date of December 2006 using the search terms

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2007 JAMA

6. A systematic review and meta-analysis of the effectiveness and safety of atovaquone-proguanil (Malarone) for chemoprophylaxis against malaria

A systematic review and meta-analysis of the effectiveness and safety of atovaquone-proguanil (Malarone) for chemoprophylaxis against malaria Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2007 DARE.

7. Malaria chemoprophylaxis in sickle cell disease. (PubMed)

Malaria chemoprophylaxis in sickle cell disease. Malaria is the most common precipitating cause of crises in sickle cell disease in malaria-endemic countries. Health professionals often recommend life-long malaria chemoprophylaxis for people with sickle cell disease living in these areas. It is therefore important we have good evidence of benefit.To assess the effects of routine malaria chemoprophylaxis in people with sickle cell disease.We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group (...) 0.04 to 0.83; 97 children), hospital admissions (RR 0.27, 95% CI 0.12 to 0.63; 97 participants), and blood transfusions (RR 0.16, 95% CI 0.05 to 0.56; 97 participants). A quasi-randomized controlled trial of 126 children in Uganda compared an antimalarial drug plus antibiotics with no antimalarial plus placebo. Chemoprophylaxis reduced the number of episodes of malaria and dactylitis, and increased mean haemoglobin values in this trial.It is beneficial to give routine malaria chemoprophylaxis

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2006 Cochrane

8. Malaria intermittent preventive treatment in infants, chemoprophylaxis, and childhood vaccinations. (PubMed)

Malaria intermittent preventive treatment in infants, chemoprophylaxis, and childhood vaccinations. Malaria accounts for 1-3 million deaths yearly worldwide, mostly in children under 5 years of age in sub-Saharan Africa. Laboratory and clinical studies show an association between acute malaria and a decreased response to diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and to meningococcal, salmonella, and Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccinations. Malaria treatment, chemoprophylaxis, or other forms of parasite (...) with the first of three daily doses of amodiaquine intermittent preventive treatment (IPTi) or placebo. After 60 days, children receiving amodiaquine had significantly fewer malaria fevers than controls.The increasing concordance of malaria control and vaccination, movement toward co-administration of IPTi with immunisation, and the increase in travellers to malarious areas who receive concurrent vaccinations and chemoprophylaxis warrant further study.

2004 Lancet

9. Delayed onset of malaria--implications for chemoprophylaxis in travelers. (PubMed)

Delayed onset of malaria--implications for chemoprophylaxis in travelers. Most antimalarial agents used by travelers act on the parasite's blood stage and therefore do not prevent late-onset illness, particularly that due to species that cause relapsing malaria. We examined the magnitude of this problem among Israeli and American travelers.We examined malaria surveillance data from Israel and the United States to determine the traveler's destination, the infecting species, the type (...) of chemoprophylaxis used, and the incubation period.In Israel, from 1994 through 1999, there were 300 cases of malaria among returning travelers in which one species of plasmodium could be identified. In 134 of these cases (44.7 percent), the illness developed more than two months after the traveler's return; nearly all of these cases were due to infection with Plasmodium vivax or P. ovale. In 108 of the 134 cases (80.6 percent), the patient had used an antimalarial regimen according to national guidelines

2003 NEJM

10. Tolerability of malaria chemoprophylaxis in non-immune travellers to sub-Saharan Africa: multicentre, randomised, double blind, four arm study. (PubMed)

Tolerability of malaria chemoprophylaxis in non-immune travellers to sub-Saharan Africa: multicentre, randomised, double blind, four arm study. To compare the tolerability of malaria chemoprophylaxis regimens in non-immune travellers.Randomised, double blind, study with placebo run-in phase.Travel clinics in Switzerland, Germany, and Israel.Proportion of participants in each treatment arm with subjectively moderate or severe adverse events.623 non-immune travellers to sub-Saharan Africa: 153

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2003 BMJ Controlled trial quality: predicted high

11. Cost-effectiveness of iron supplementation and malaria chemoprophylaxis in the prevention of anaemia and malaria among Tanzanian infants

Cost-effectiveness of iron supplementation and malaria chemoprophylaxis in the prevention of anaemia and malaria among Tanzanian infants Cost-effectiveness of iron supplementation and malaria chemoprophylaxis in the prevention of anaemia and malaria among Tanzanian infants Cost-effectiveness of iron supplementation and malaria chemoprophylaxis in the prevention of anaemia and malaria among Tanzanian infants Alonso Gonzalez M, Menendez C, Font F, Kahigwa E, Kimario J, Mshinda H, Tanner M, Bosch (...) -Capblanch X, Alonso P L Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology Iron supplementation and malaria chemoprophylaxis (Deltaprim) in the prevention of anaemia and malaria. Type of intervention Primary prevention. Economic study

2000 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

12. Malaria chemoprophylaxis with tafenoquine: a randomised study. (PubMed)

Malaria chemoprophylaxis with tafenoquine: a randomised study. Tafenoquine is an analogue of primaquine with an improved therapeutic and safety profile. It has a long half-life and activity against liver-stage malaria parasites, so may be useful for chemoprophylaxis. In this randomised, double-blind study we assessed the efficacy and safety of tafenoquine in different doses.2144 individuals aged 12-20 years living in Lambaréné, Gabon, an endemic area for Plasmodium falciparum malaria, were (...) to replace currently used drugs for malaria chemoprophylaxis.

2000 Lancet Controlled trial quality: predicted high

13. Randomised placebo-controlled trial of iron supplementation and malaria chemoprophylaxis for prevention of severe anaemia and malaria in Tanzanian infants. (PubMed)

Randomised placebo-controlled trial of iron supplementation and malaria chemoprophylaxis for prevention of severe anaemia and malaria in Tanzanian infants. Malaria and anaemia, especially that due to iron deficiency, are two leading causes of morbidity worldwide. Little is known about the relative contribution of Plasmodium falciparum infection and iron deficiency to the aetiology of anaemia in malaria-endemic areas. We undertook a randomised comparison of different strategies for control (...) . supplementation was given from 8 to 24 weeks of age, and the weekly chemoprophylaxis from 8 to 48 weeks. The frequency of severe anaemia (packed-cell volume < 25%) and malaria episodes was assessed through a combination of passive case detection and cross-sectional surveys.The groups that received iron supplementation had a lower frequency of severe anaemia than those that did not receive iron (0.62 vs 0.87 cases per person-year; protective efficacy 28.8% [95% CI 6.3-45.8). Iron supplementation had no effect

1997 Lancet Controlled trial quality: predicted high

14. Inadequacy of chlorproguanil 20 mg per week as chemoprophylaxis for falciparum malaria in Kenya. (PubMed)

Inadequacy of chlorproguanil 20 mg per week as chemoprophylaxis for falciparum malaria in Kenya. After treatment with chloroquine and pyrimethamine/sulfadoxine, 118 school children aged 6 to 10 years living near the Kenyan coast were enrolled in a malaria chemoprophylaxis study and followed up for 20 weeks. Children were randomly assigned to receive either chlorproguanil 20 mg weekly (n = 78) or placebo (n = 37). The attack rate of Plasmodium falciparum infection was 42% in chlorproguanil

1987 Lancet Controlled trial quality: uncertain