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Top results for Lice

1. Head lice infestations: A clinical update

Head lice infestations: A clinical update Head lice ( Pediculus humanus capitis ) infestations are not a primary health hazard or a vector for disease, but they are a societal problem with substantial costs. Diagnosis of head lice infestation requires the detection of a living louse. Although pyrethrins and permethrin remain first-line treatments in Canada, isopropyl myristate/ST-cyclomethicone solution and dimeticone can be considered as second-line therapies when there is evidence (...) of treatment failure. Keywords: Dimeticone solution; Head lice; Infestations; Isopropyl myristate/cyclomethicone solution; Permethrin; Pyrethrin.

2018 Canadian Paediatric Society

2. Head lice eradication products: risk of serious burns if treated hair is exposed to open flames or other sources of ignition, eg, cigarettes

Head lice eradication products: risk of serious burns if treated hair is exposed to open flames or other sources of ignition, eg, cigarettes Head lice eradication products: risk of serious burns if treated hair is exposed to open flames or other sources of ignition, eg, cigarettes - GOV.UK GOV.UK uses cookies to make the site simpler. Search Head lice eradication products: risk of serious burns if treated hair is exposed to open flames or other sources of ignition, eg, cigarettes Pharmacists (...) should tell people about the risk of fire when they discuss head lice eradication options. Published 8 March 2018 From: Therapeutic area: , Contents Advice to pharmacists some products for the eradication of head lice infestations are combustible/flammable when on the hair and can ignite and cause serious harm in the presence of an open flame or other source of ignition such as when lighting cigarettes advise parents, caregivers and the person with head lice, if appropriate, that they should

2018 MHRA Drug Safety Update

4. Head lice infestations: A clinical update

Head lice infestations: A clinical update Head lice ( Pediculus humanus capitis ) infestations are not a primary health hazard or a vector for disease, but they are a societal problem with substantial costs. Diagnosis of head lice infestation requires the detection of a living louse. Although pyrethrins and permethrin remain first-line treatments in Canada, isopropyl myristate/ST-cyclomethicone solution and dimeticone can be considered as second-line therapies when there is evidence (...) of treatment failure. Keywords: Dimeticone solution; Head lice; Infestations; Isopropyl myristate/cyclomethicone solution; Permethrin; Pyrethrin.

2016 Canadian Paediatric Society

5. Head lice

Head lice Head lice - NICE CKS Clinical Knowledge Summaries Share Head lice: Summary Head lice ( Pediculus humanus capitis) are parasitic insects that infest the hairs of the human head and feed on blood from the scalp. Head lice infestation is known as pediculosis capitis. The severity of infestation varies from a few lice (less than 10) to more than 1000 in severe cases, but a typical infestation might have about 30 lice per head. If left untreated, head lice infestation may persist for long (...) periods. Detection combing is the best way to confirm the presence of lice. This is the systematic combing of wet or dry hair using a fine-toothed (0.2–0.3 mm apart) head lice detection comb. A diagnosis of active head lice infestation should only be made if a live head louse is found. An itching scalp is not sufficient to diagnose active infestation. The presence of louse eggs alone, whether hatched (nits) or unhatched, is not proof of active infestation. A person should only be treated if a live

2016 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

6. Head lice: Dimeticone is the pediculicide of choice

Head lice: Dimeticone is the pediculicide of choice Prescrire IN ENGLISH - Spotlight ''Head lice: Dimeticone is the pediculicide of choice '', 1 July 2014 {1} {1} {1} | | > > > Head lice: Dimeticone is the pediculicide of choice Spotlight Every month, the subjects in Prescrire’s Spotlight. 100 most recent :  |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |  Spotlight Head lice: Dimeticone is the pediculicide of choice FEATURED REVIEW (...) Pyrethroids are no longer the first-choice treatment for head lice: they are losing effectiveness and may be toxic in the long term. Dimeticone is a better choice, because it has few known adverse effects and proven efficacy. Full review (4 pages) available for download by subscribers. Abstract Infestation of the scalp by head lice , or pediculosis, is a common, unpleasant but harmless parasitosis. For patients with pediculosis , which topical treatment eradicates the parasites effectively while causing

2014 Prescrire

7. Head lice treatments

Head lice treatments USE OF HEAD LICE TREATMENTS IN PREGNANCY 0344 892 0909 USE OF HEAD LICE TREATMENTS IN PREGNANCY (Date of issue: February 2018 , Version: 2 ) This is a UKTIS monograph for use by health care professionals. For case-specific advice please contact UKTIS on 0344 892 0909. To report an exposure please download and complete a . Please encourage all women to complete an . A corresponding patient information leaflet on is available at . Summary Head lice (Pediculus humanus capitis (...) ) are parasitic insects that infest the hairs of the human head and feed on blood from the scalp. Head lice can be treated by ‘wet combing’ or with medicated lotions or sprays consisting of either silicone- or fatty acid ester-based preparations, or chemical insecticides. Crème rinses and shampoos are not considered effective and are therefore not recommended in the treatment of head lice. There are very limited human data on safety during pregnancy of any of the medicinal products used in the treatment

2014 UK Teratology Information Service

8. Wet combing for head lice

Wet combing for head lice RACGP - Wet combing for head lice Search Become a student member today for free and be part of the RACGP community A career in general practice Starting the GP journey Enrolments for the 2019.1 OSCE FRACGP exams closing 29 March 2019 Fellowship FRACGP exams Research Practice Experience Program is a self-directed education program designed to support non vocationally registered doctors on their pathway to RACGP Fellowship Fellowship International graduates FRACGP exams (...) Media Releases 2013 Media Releases 2012 Media Releases Search Wet combing: head lice Wet combing: head lice Introduction Half of the people infested with lice do not scratch; all people in contact with an affected person should be manually checked for lice. Intervention Manual (condition and comb or wet comb) removal using the Bug Buster® kit, Quit Nits Combing Solution® or other head lice comb. Indication Head lice ( Pediculosis capitis) infestation. Suitable for insecticide resistant infestations

2013 Handbook of Non-Drug interventions (HANDI)

9. Topical 0.5% ivermectin lotion for treatment of head lice. (PubMed)

Topical 0.5% ivermectin lotion for treatment of head lice. The emergence of resistance to treatment complicates the public health problem of head-louse infestations and drives the need for continuing development of new treatments. There are limited data on the activity of ivermectin as a topical lousicide.In two multisite, randomized, double-blind studies, we compared a single application of 0.5% ivermectin lotion with vehicle control for the elimination of infestations without nit combing (...) in patients 6 months of age or older. A tube of topical ivermectin or vehicle control was dispensed on day 1, to be applied to dry hair, left for 10 minutes, then rinsed with water. The primary end point was the percentage of index patients (youngest household member with ≥3 live lice) in the intention-to-treat population who were louse-free 1 day after treatment (day 2) and remained so through days 8 and 15.A total of 765 patients completed the studies. In the intention-to-treat population, significantly

2012 NEJM

10. Permethrin Treatment of Head Lice with Knockdown Resistance-like Gene. (PubMed)

Permethrin Treatment of Head Lice with Knockdown Resistance-like Gene. 21268748 2011 02 04 2013 11 21 1533-4406 364 4 2011 Jan 27 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Permethrin treatment of head lice with knockdown resistance-like gene. 386-7 10.1056/NEJMc1007171 Bialek Ralf R Zelck Ulrike E UE Fölster-Holst Regina R eng Comment Letter Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't United States N Engl J Med 0255562 0028-4793 0 Insecticides 509F88P9SZ Permethrin 70288-86-7 Ivermectin AIM IM (...) N Engl J Med. 2010 Mar 11;362(10):896-905 20220184 Adolescent Animals Child Child, Preschool Female Humans Infant Insecticide Resistance genetics Insecticides therapeutic use Ivermectin therapeutic use Lice Infestations drug therapy Male Permethrin Phthiraptera genetics Scalp Dermatoses drug therapy 2011 1 28 6 0 2011 1 28 6 0 2011 2 5 6 0 ppublish 21268748 10.1056/NEJMc1007171

2011 NEJM

11. Pubic lice

Pubic lice Pubic lice - NICE CKS Clinical Knowledge Summaries Share Pubic lice: Summary Pubic lice infestation (pediculosis pubis) is caused by an obligate, blood-sucking ectoparasite — Phthirus pubis . Transmission of pubic lice most often occurs through sexual or non-sexual close body contact but lice may also crawl onto a host from infested materials such as bedding, clothing or towels. Children with pubic lice infestation are usually thought to have acquired this innocently (...) , but the possibility of sexual abuse should be considered and managed appropriately. The complications of pubic lice infestation include: Excoriation and infection of the skin due to scratching. Lichenification and hyperpigmentation of skin in chronic infestation. Blepharitis, conjunctivitis, or corneal epithelial keratitis if the eyelashes are involved. Pubic lice infestation commonly presents as genital pruritus, which is worse at night — pruritus may occasionally be localised to other areas or become

2011 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

12. Oral ivermectin versus malathion lotion for difficult-to-treat head lice. (PubMed)

Oral ivermectin versus malathion lotion for difficult-to-treat head lice. Head-lice infestation is prevalent worldwide, especially in children 3 to 11 years old. Topical insecticides (i.e., pyrethroids and malathion) used as a lotion, applied twice at an interval of 7 to 11 days, are typically used for treatment. Resistance of lice to insecticides, particularly pyrethroids, results in treatment failure. The efficacy of alternative agents is controversial.We conducted a multicenter, cluster (...) -randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, controlled trial comparing oral ivermectin (at a dose of 400 microg per kilogram of body weight) with 0.5% malathion lotion, each given on days 1 and 8, for patients with live lice not eradicated by topical insecticide used 2 to 6 weeks before enrollment. The cluster was defined as the household. Infestation was confirmed and monitored by means of fine-toothed combing. Patients were at least 2 years of age and weighed at least 15 kg; all were treated at the study

2010 NEJM

13. Lindane and other treatments for lice and scabies: a review of clinical effectiveness and safety

Lindane and other treatments for lice and scabies: a review of clinical effectiveness and safety Lindane and other treatments for lice and scabies: a review of clinical effectiveness and safety Lindane and other treatments for lice and scabies: a review of clinical effectiveness and safety Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality (...) of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health. Lindane and other treatments for lice and scabies: a review of clinical effectiveness and safety. Ottawa: Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH). 2010 Authors' conclusions In summary, there are several promising new treatments for the management of head lice including ivermectin, malathion, benzyl alcohol, spinosad, isopropyl myristate, and dimeticone. However, benzyl

2010 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

14. Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of pediculosis capitis (head lice) in children and adults 2008.

Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of pediculosis capitis (head lice) in children and adults 2008. Guidelines and Measures | Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality HHS.gov Search ahrq.gov Search ahrq.gov Menu Topics A - Z Healthcare Delivery Latest available findings on quality of and access to health care Searchable database of AHRQ Grants, Working Papers & HHS Recovery Act Projects AHRQ Projects funded by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Trust Fund You are here Guidelines

2008 University of Texas at Austin School of Nursing, Family Nurse Practitioner Program

15. The Bug Buster kit was better than single dose pediculicides for head lice

The Bug Buster kit was better than single dose pediculicides for head lice The Bug Buster kit was better than single dose pediculicides for head lice | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username (...) * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here The Bug Buster kit was better than single dose pediculicides for head lice Article Text Therapeutics The Bug Buster kit was better than single dose pediculicides for head lice Statistics from Altmetric.com Request Permissions If you wish to reuse

2007 Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)

16. Single blind, randomised, comparative study of the Bug Buster kit and over the counter pediculicide treatments against head lice in the United Kingdom. (PubMed)

Single blind, randomised, comparative study of the Bug Buster kit and over the counter pediculicide treatments against head lice in the United Kingdom. To compare the effectiveness of the Bug Buster kit with a single treatment of over the counter pediculicides for eliminating head lice.Single blind, multicentre, randomised, comparative clinical study.Four counties in England and one county in Scotland.133 young people aged 2-15 years with head louse infestation: 56 were allocated to the Bug (...) Buster kit and 70 to pediculicide treatment.Home use of proprietary pediculicides (organophosphate or pyrethroid) or the Bug Buster kit.Presence of head lice 2-4 days after end of treatment: day 5 for the pediculicides and day 15 for the Bug Buster kit.The cure rate using the Bug Buster kit was significantly greater than that for the pediculicides (57% v 13%; relative risk 4.4, 95% confidence interval 2.3 to 8.5). Number needed to treat for the Bug Buster kit compared with the pediculicides was 2.26

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2005 BMJ

17. Comparison of wet combing with malathion for treatment of head lice in the UK: a pragmatic randomised controlled trial. (PubMed)

Comparison of wet combing with malathion for treatment of head lice in the UK: a pragmatic randomised controlled trial. Concern about the effectiveness and toxicity of insecticide lotions has led to promotion of mechanical methods to remove head lice. We compared the effectiveness of "bug-busting" (wet combing with a fine-toothed comb) and malathion lotion.We screened 4037 schoolchildren in two counties in Wales, UK (intermediate resistance to malathion). Of 167 found to have head lice, 81 (...) (aged 3-14 years) were eligible to participate in a randomised controlled trial that compared mechanical removal of lice by a commercial kit every 3-4 days for 2 weeks with two applications of 0.5% malathion lotion 7 days apart; parents carried out both treatments. The outcome measure was the presence of live lice 7 days after the end of treatment. Analyses were by intention to treat.74 children completed the study and 72 were included in the analysis. The cure rate was 38% (12 of 32) for bug

2000 Lancet

18. Treating head lice and scabies

Treating head lice and scabies Treating head lice and scabies Treating head lice and scabies NHS Centre for Reviews and Dissemination Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation NHS Centre for Reviews and Dissemination. Treating head lice and scabies. University of York. Effectiveness Matters 4(1). 1999 Authors' objectives (...) To summarise the available evidence on the treatment of head lice and scabies. Authors' conclusions Head Lice Infestation with head lice is widespread and most commonly occurs in children. Physical evidence of living lice is necessary prior to the commencement of treatment. Close contacts should be traced and if found to be infested treated at the same time. There is no evidence that any one insecticide currently in use in the UK has a greater effect than another. Best choice will depend on local

1999 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

19. Systematic review of clinical efficacy of topical treatments for head lice. (PubMed)

Systematic review of clinical efficacy of topical treatments for head lice. To collect and evaluate all trials on clinical efficacy of topical treatments for head lice.Systematic review of randomised trials identified from following data sources: Medline, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, Science Citation Index, letters to key authors and companies, and hand search of journals.Trials in schools or communities.Patients infested with lice.Cure rate (absence of live lice and viable nits (...) ) on day 14 after treatment.Total of 28 trials were identified and evaluated according to eight general and 18 lice specific criteria. Of the 14 trials rated as having low to moderate risk of bias, seven were selected as they used the main outcome measure. These seven trials described 21 evaluations of eight different compounds and placebo (all but two evaluations were of single applications). Only permethrin 1% creme rinse showed efficacy in more than two studies with the lower 95% confidence limit

Full Text available with Trip Pro

1995 BMJ

20. Systematic review of clinical efficacy of topical treatments for head lice

Systematic review of clinical efficacy of topical treatments for head lice Systematic review of clinical efficacy of topical treatments for head lice Systematic review of clinical efficacy of topical treatments for head lice Vander Stichele R H, Dezeure E M, Bogaert M G Authors' objectives To evaluate all trials on clinical efficacy of topical treatments for head lice. Searching MEDLINE was searched from 1966 to March 1995 using the keywords 'Pediculosis', 'Lice', 'Pediculus'. International (...) treatments for killing lice. Most trials evaluated single applications of the treatments. Compounds (in lotion and/or shampoo form) included in trials were: carbaryl; lindane; malathion; permethrin; pyrethrines (bioresmethrin, chlorphenamide, pyrethrin). Participants included in the review People infested with head lice in the community or schools were included. Outcomes assessed in the review The outcome assessed was the absence of live lice and viable nits on day 14 after treatment (determined

1995 DARE.