Latest & greatest articles for Lice

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Top results for Lice

1. Abametapir (Xeglyze) - To treat head lice

Abametapir (Xeglyze) - To treat head lice Drug Approval Package: XEGLYZE U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Search FDA Submit search Drug Approval Package: XEGLYZE Company: Dr. Reddy’s Laboratories Application Number: 206966 Approval Date: 07/24/2020 Persons with disabilities having problems accessing the PDF files below may call (301) 796-3634 for assistance. FDA Approval Letter and Labeling (PDF) (PDF) FDA Application Review Files (PDF) (PDF) (PDF) (PDF) (PDF) (PDF) (PDF) (PDF

2020 FDA - Drug Approval Package

2. Clinical studies evaluating abametapir lotion, 0.74%, for the treatment of head louse infestation

Clinical studies evaluating abametapir lotion, 0.74%, for the treatment of head louse infestation EVMS Emergency Medicine Journal Club Therapy Worksheet Resident: Gavin Rogers Date: 4/22/20 Citation: Bowles VM, VanLuvanee LJ, Alsop H, et al. Clinical studies evaluating abametapir lotion, 0.74%, for the treatment of head louse infestation. Pediatric Dermatology. 2018;35:616–621. Objective: To test the efficacy of abametapir vs. vehicle solution to clear lice infestation without nit combing (...) . Methodology (design, inclusion and exclusion criteria, interventions compared, outcomes evaluated) Design: Two randomized, double-blind, multicenter, parallel group single-dose vehicle-controlled studies in subjects aged 6 months to 61.1 years. Inclusion: Eligible subjects were male or female, aged 6 months and older, with an active head louse infestation. The youngest household member with at least three live head lice was designated as the index subject and included in the primary analysis. Other

2020 Emergency Medicine Journal Club

3. Ivermectin for Parasitic Skin Infections of Lice: A Review of Comparative Clinical Effectiveness, Cost-Effectiveness, and Guidelines

was identified regarding the comparative clinical effectiveness of oral versus topical ivermectin for parasitic skin infections of lice. This evidence of limited quality suggested that both oral and topical ivermectin were effective for the treatment of patients with pediculosis capitis. The study found that the cure rates of lice infestation and pruritus were significantly higher among those receiving topical ivermectin compared to oral ivermectin one week after initial treatment; however, after a second (...) for parasitic skin infections of lice was identified.One evidence-based guideline was identified regarding the use of ivermectin for parasitic skin infections of lice. The guideline provides weak recommendations (based on evidence of limited quality) for the use of oral or topical ivermectin for the treatment of individuals with pediculosis pubis. Oral ivermectin should be considered as a second-line therapy or as an option for individuals with infestation in the eyelashes (with the exception of children

2019 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

4. Pubic lice: What else might it be?

nits. Conjunctivitis or blepharitis (if eyelashes are involved) — for more information, see the CKS topics on , and . Head or body lice — for more information on head lice see the CKS topic on . Basis for recommendation Information on the differential diagnosis of pubic lice is based on expert opinion from review articles [ ; ; ; ; ]. © . (...) Pubic lice: What else might it be? Differential diagnosis | Diagnosis | Pubic lice | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Differential diagnosis Pubic lice: What else might it be? Last revised in February 2018 What else might it be? The clinical features of pubic lice infestation may be similar to: Scabies — for more information see the CKS topic on . Dermatophyte infection — for more information, see the CKS topic on . Folliculitis. Seborrheic dermatitis — scales or crusts can be brushed off unlike

2019 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

5. Pubic lice: What are the clinical features of pubic lice infestation?

with Pithyris pubis — associated features may include erythema, crusting and matting of eyelashes and conjunctivitis. Visible lice or nits in any area with coarse body hair (most often the pubic area, less commonly the axillae, chest, abdomen, perianal area, beard area, eyelashes and eyebrows). Rust-coloured flecks of faecal material may be seen. Skin lesions such as: Small blue macules (‘maculae cerulae’) or red papules — may be seen at feeding sites. Lichenification and hyperpigmentation of pruritic areas (...) — may occur in chronic infestation. Basis for recommendation Information on the clinical features of pubic lice infestation are based on the clinical guidelines Canadian guidelines on sexually transmitted infections. Management and treatment of specific infections - ectoparasitic infestations [ ], Sexually transmitted infections in primary care [ ] , Pubic lice [ ] , and European guideline for the management of pediculosis pubis [ ] and expert opinion in review articles [ ; ; ; ]. Pruritus

2019 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

6. Pubic lice: Scenario: Management of pubic lice

o C) to eradicate lice. Topical treatments There are few quality data comparing the available treatments of pediculosis pubis and most recent studies relate to treatment of pediculosis capitis [ ]. Pregnancy and breast feeding: The UK Medicines Information (UKMi) for NHS professionals could find no studies relating to the passage of topically applied malathion or permethrin into human breast milk. Percutaneous absorption of malathion is about 4% and it is rapidly destroyed by plasma (...) . The clinical picture is atypical — the diagnosis may need to be reconsidered. Referral to GUM or a dermatologist may be indicated. Basis for recommendation Recommendations on the management of a person with pubic lice infestation are based on the clinical guidelines United Kingdom National Guideline on the Management of Phthirus pubis infestation (2007) [ ], Canadian guidelines on sexually transmitted infections. Management and treatment of specific infections - ectoparasitic infestations [ ], Sexually

2019 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

7. Pubic lice: Permethrin

Pubic lice: Permethrin Permethrin | Prescribing information | Pubic lice | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Permethrin Pubic lice: Permethrin Last revised in February 2018 Permethrin Contraindications and cautions Known hypersensitivity to the product, its components, other pyrethroids or pyrethrins. Not licensed for treatment of crab lice in children under 18 years. There may be variation in licensing of different medicines containing the same drug. Avoid contact with eyes — if contact occurs

2019 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

8. Pubic lice: Malathion

Pubic lice: Malathion Malathion | Prescribing information | Pubic lice | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Malathion Pubic lice: Malathion Last revised in February 2018 Malathion Contraindications and cautions Known hypersensitivity to the product or its components. Pregnancy and breastfeeding. Not licensed for use in children under 6 months except under medical supervision. There may be variation in the licensing of different medicines containing the same drug. Lotion should not be used more than

2019 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

9. Pubic lice: How should I assess a person with suspected pubic lice infestation?

with suspected pubic lice are based on the clinical guidelines Canadian guidelines on sexually transmitted infections. Management and treatment of specific infections - ectoparasitic infestations [ ], Sexually transmitted infections in primary care [ ], 2015 Sexually transmitted diseases treatment guidelines. Ectoparasitic infections: pediculosis pubis [ ], Pubic lice [ ], and European guideline for the management of pediculosis pubis [ ] and expert opinion in review articles [ ; ; ]. Ask about other (...) be localised to other infested areas or generalised. Visible lice ('crab'-shaped, grey-brown in colour, and about 2 mm in length) or eggs (yellow/white in colour and smaller than a pinhead). Other possible sexually transmitted infections. For more information see the CKS topics on , , , , , , , and . Examine the person looking for: Adult lice and/or nits — a dermatoscope, magnifying lens or fine toothed comb may aid identification. As pubic lice may be found in any coarse hair, all hairy parts of the body

2019 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

10. Pubic lice

Pubic lice Pubic lice | Topics A to Z | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Pubic lice Pubic lice Last revised in February 2018 Pubic lice infestation is caused by the louse Phthirus pubis.Pubic lice are blood-sucking insects, and are obligate parasites of humans. Diagnosis Management Prescribing information Background information Pubic lice: Summary Pubic lice infestation (pediculosis pubis) is caused by an obligate, blood-sucking ectoparasite — Phthirus pubis . Transmission of pubic lice most often (...) occurs through sexual or non-sexual close body contact but lice may also crawl onto a host from infested materials such as bedding, clothing or towels. Children with pubic lice infestation are usually thought to have acquired this innocently, but the possibility of sexual abuse should be considered and managed appropriately. The complications of pubic lice infestation include: Excoriation and infection of the skin due to scratching. Lichenification and hyperpigmentation of skin in chronic infestation

2019 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

11. Head lice eradication products: risk of serious burns if treated hair is exposed to open flames or other sources of ignition, eg, cigarettes

undergoing treatment came into contact with a naked flame, resulting in very serious burns. Pharmacists should encourage parents, caregivers, and people with head lice to read the instructions carefully for all headlice eradication products. Article citation: Drug Safety Update volume 11 issue 8; March 2018: 3. Published 8 March 2018 Related content Explore the topic Is this page useful? Thank you for your feedback Help us improve GOV.UK Don’t include personal or financial information like your National (...) Head lice eradication products: risk of serious burns if treated hair is exposed to open flames or other sources of ignition, eg, cigarettes Head lice eradication products: risk of serious burns if treated hair is exposed to open flames or other sources of ignition, eg, cigarettes - GOV.UK GOV.UK uses cookies to make the site simpler. Search Head lice eradication products: risk of serious burns if treated hair is exposed to open flames or other sources of ignition, eg, cigarettes Pharmacists

2018 MHRA Drug Safety Update

12. Head lice infestations: A clinical update

Head lice infestations: A clinical update Head lice ( Pediculus humanus capitis ) infestations are not a primary health hazard or a vector for disease, but they are a societal problem with substantial costs. Diagnosis of head lice infestation requires the detection of a living louse. Although pyrethrins and permethrin remain first-line treatments in Canada, isopropyl myristate/ST-cyclomethicone solution and dimeticone can be considered as second-line therapies when there is evidence (...) of treatment failure. Keywords: Dimeticone solution; Head lice; Infestations; Isopropyl myristate/cyclomethicone solution; Permethrin; Pyrethrin.

2018 Canadian Paediatric Society

13. Pediculosis capitis

are not effective and should be abandoned. Definition The head louse ( Pediculus humanus capitis ) is an obligate ectoparasite that lives on human beings and feeds on human blood. Burgess IF, Silverston P. Head lice. Clin Evid (Online). January 2015. http://clinicalevidence.bmj.com (last accessed 2 November 2016). http://clinicalevidence.bmj.com/ceweb/conditions/skd/1703/1703.jsp http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25587918?tool=bestpractice.com Head lice infestation (pediculosis capitis) mainly affects those (...) Pediculosis capitis Pediculosis capitis - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Pediculosis capitis Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: June 2018 Summary Head lice infestations are associated with little morbidity but cause strain and distress to parents, carers, and teachers. Effective pediculicides exist, but head lice in some areas have developed resistance to products with a neurotoxic mode

2018 BMJ Best Practice

14. Impact of theory-based educational intervention on explaining preventive pediculosis infestation behavior among primary school students Full Text available with Trip Pro

Impact of theory-based educational intervention on explaining preventive pediculosis infestation behavior among primary school students Despite the fact that improved health, social, and economic situations have significantly affected the reduction of its infestation, pediculosis is still spreading worldwide.This study is conducted to evaluate the explanatory power of health belief model constructs in adoption of preventive pediculosis infestation behavior in female primary school students.This (...) group was based on the low-effective construct. The path analysis and LISREL 8.5 software was utilized to compare the fit and the variance cover percentage of adopting preventive pediculosis infestation behaviors.According to the pre-intervention findings, there was no significant difference between experimental and control groups in terms of factors affecting the adoption of preventive pediculosis infestation behavior. This model had a weaker fit in the experimental than the control group

2017 Electronic physician

15. Head lice infestations: A clinical update

Head lice infestations: A clinical update Head lice ( Pediculus humanus capitis ) infestations are not a primary health hazard or a vector for disease, but they are a societal problem with substantial costs. Diagnosis of head lice infestation requires the detection of a living louse. Although pyrethrins and permethrin remain first-line treatments in Canada, isopropyl myristate/ST-cyclomethicone solution and dimeticone can be considered as second-line therapies when there is evidence (...) of treatment failure. Keywords: Dimeticone solution; Head lice; Infestations; Isopropyl myristate/cyclomethicone solution; Permethrin; Pyrethrin.

2016 Canadian Paediatric Society

16. The louse is (no longer) in the house

lice express genes associated with traditional pediculicide resistance. 6 • Dimeticone is a silicone-based product that acts as an occlusive to suffocate lice. 7 o Other occlusive agents like isopropyl myristrate also appear more effective than traditional pediculicides. 8 • In one study <20% children with nits developed active lice. 9 o Wet combing better than visual inspection for diagnosing lice. 10 • Head lice primarily transmitted from head to head contact in play, sharing beds (...) is (no longer) in the house Clinical Question: What is the best treatment for head lice? Bottom-line: Dimeticone (or dimethicone) appears superior to traditional lice treatments (like permethrin or malathion), getting one more in 3-4 patients lice free with no increased adverse events. Dimeticone is a silicone-based product that suffocates lice and is applied to dry hair, left eight hours, and often repeated after one week. Evidence: • Statistically significant results: o Dimeticone versus permethrin: Two

2016 Tools for Practice

17. Head lice: Dimeticone is the pediculicide of choice

Pyrethroids are no longer the first-choice treatment for head lice: they are losing effectiveness and may be toxic in the long term. Dimeticone is a better choice, because it has few known adverse effects and proven efficacy. Full review (4 pages) available for download by subscribers. Abstract Infestation of the scalp by head lice , or pediculosis, is a common, unpleasant but harmless parasitosis. For patients with pediculosis , which topical treatment eradicates the parasites effectively while causing (...) Head lice: Dimeticone is the pediculicide of choice Prescrire IN ENGLISH - Spotlight ''Head lice: Dimeticone is the pediculicide of choice '', 1 July 2014 {1} {1} {1} | | > > > Head lice: Dimeticone is the pediculicide of choice Spotlight Every month, the subjects in Prescrire’s Spotlight. 100 most recent :  |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |  Spotlight Head lice: Dimeticone is the pediculicide of choice FEATURED REVIEW

2014 Prescrire

18. Head lice treatments

Head lice treatments USE OF HEAD LICE TREATMENTS IN PREGNANCY 0344 892 0909 USE OF HEAD LICE TREATMENTS IN PREGNANCY (Date of issue: February 2018 , Version: 2 ) This is a UKTIS monograph for use by health care professionals. For case-specific advice please contact UKTIS on 0344 892 0909. To report an exposure please download and complete a . Please encourage all women to complete an . A corresponding patient information leaflet on is available at . Summary Head lice (Pediculus humanus capitis (...) ) are parasitic insects that infest the hairs of the human head and feed on blood from the scalp. Head lice can be treated by ‘wet combing’ or with medicated lotions or sprays consisting of either silicone- or fatty acid ester-based preparations, or chemical insecticides. Crème rinses and shampoos are not considered effective and are therefore not recommended in the treatment of head lice. There are very limited human data on safety during pregnancy of any of the medicinal products used in the treatment

2014 UK Teratology Information Service

19. Wet combing for head lice

Media Releases 2013 Media Releases 2012 Media Releases Search Wet combing: head lice Wet combing: head lice Introduction Half of the people infested with lice do not scratch; all people in contact with an affected person should be manually checked for lice. Intervention Manual (condition and comb or wet comb) removal using the Bug Buster® kit, Quit Nits Combing Solution® or other head lice comb. Indication Head lice ( Pediculosis capitis) infestation. Suitable for insecticide resistant infestations (...) Wet combing for head lice RACGP - Wet combing for head lice Search Become a student member today for free and be part of the RACGP community A career in general practice Starting the GP journey Enrolments for the 2019.1 OSCE FRACGP exams closing 29 March 2019 Fellowship FRACGP exams Research Practice Experience Program is a self-directed education program designed to support non vocationally registered doctors on their pathway to RACGP Fellowship Fellowship International graduates FRACGP exams

2013 Handbook of Non-Drug interventions (HANDI)

20. Topical 0.5% ivermectin lotion for treatment of head lice. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Topical 0.5% ivermectin lotion for treatment of head lice. The emergence of resistance to treatment complicates the public health problem of head-louse infestations and drives the need for continuing development of new treatments. There are limited data on the activity of ivermectin as a topical lousicide.In two multisite, randomized, double-blind studies, we compared a single application of 0.5% ivermectin lotion with vehicle control for the elimination of infestations without nit combing (...) in patients 6 months of age or older. A tube of topical ivermectin or vehicle control was dispensed on day 1, to be applied to dry hair, left for 10 minutes, then rinsed with water. The primary end point was the percentage of index patients (youngest household member with ≥3 live lice) in the intention-to-treat population who were louse-free 1 day after treatment (day 2) and remained so through days 8 and 15.A total of 765 patients completed the studies. In the intention-to-treat population, significantly

2012 NEJM Controlled trial quality: predicted high