Latest & greatest articles for Japanese Encephalitis

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Top results for Japanese Encephalitis

1. The changing epidemiology of Japanese encephalitis and New data: the implications for New recommendations for Japanese encephalitis vaccine (PubMed)

The changing epidemiology of Japanese encephalitis and New data: the implications for New recommendations for Japanese encephalitis vaccine The epidemiology of Japanese Encephalitis and risk to the traveler has changed and continues to evolve. The spread of Japanese Encephalitis virus into new environments, changes in agricultural practice and animal vectors, climate change, peri-urban growth, changes in international travel to Asia, personal risk factors, mosquito vector free transmission (...) , interactions with other flaviviruses and better information on infections without encephalitis and other factors make Japanese Encephalitis an underappreciated risk. There has also been a change in the incidence of Japanese Encephalitis cases that questions the current travel duration and geographic based recommendations. A safe, effective vaccine (Ixiaro) that may be administered in a short course regimen is now available in the United States without the risks of the previous vaccine. However, the vaccine

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2017 Tropical diseases, travel medicine and vaccines

2. Japanese encephalitis: surveillance and immunization in Asia and the Western Pacific, 2016 – Encéphalite japonaise: surveillance et vaccination en Asie et dans le Pacifique occidental, 2016

Japanese encephalitis: surveillance and immunization in Asia and the Western Pacific, 2016 – Encéphalite japonaise: surveillance et vaccination en Asie et dans le Pacifique occidental, 2016 Japanese encephalitis: surveillance and immunization in Asia and the Western Pacific, 2016 – Encéphalite japonaise: surveillance et vaccination en Asie et dans le Pacifique occidental, 2016 JavaScript is disabled for your browser. Some features of this site may not work without it. Toggle navigation Toggle (...) navigation Search Browse Statistics Related Links Japanese encephalitis: surveillance and immunization in Asia and the Western Pacific, 2016 – Encéphalite japonaise: surveillance et vaccination en Asie et dans le Pacifique occidental, 2016 View/ Open View Statistics Altmetrics Share Citation World Health Organization = Organisation mondiale de la Santé . (‎2017)‎. Japanese encephalitis: surveillance and immunization in Asia and the Western Pacific, 2016 – Encéphalite japonaise: surveillance et

2017 WHO

3. Expression of domain III of the envelope protein from GP-78: a Japanese encephalitis virus (PubMed)

Expression of domain III of the envelope protein from GP-78: a Japanese encephalitis virus Acute encephalitis caused by the Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) represents a growing epidemic and is a cause for concern in Southeast Asia. JEV is transmitted to humans through the bite of the Culicine mosquito species. The virus genome comprising of an RNA strand also encodes the envelope protein (E) which surrounds the virus. The E protein aids in fusion of virus with the cellular membrane

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2017 Virusdisease

4. Effect of single dose of SA 14-14-2 vaccine 1 year after immunisation in Nepalese children with Japanese encephalitis: a case-control study. (PubMed)

Effect of single dose of SA 14-14-2 vaccine 1 year after immunisation in Nepalese children with Japanese encephalitis: a case-control study. In July, 1999, a single dose of live-attenuated SA 14-14-2 Japanese encephalitis vaccine was given to children aged 1-15 years in the Terai region of Nepal. Cases of natural infection occurred almost immediately. Our aim was to assess the long-term protective effect of this vaccination.In 2000, this same population had a second seasonal exposure (...) to the virus. We therefore did a case-control study to measure the prevalence of vaccination against Japanese encephalitis in 35 patients hospitalised for the disease 1 year after immunisation, and in age-sex matched village controls.Of 35 children resident in Bardiya and Banke districts admitted to the Bheri Zonal Hospital with serologically confirmed Japanese encephalitis, only one had been vaccinated in 1999. In 430 age-sex matched village controls, 234 (54.4%) were vaccinated. We calculated a median

2017 Lancet

5. Circulating levels of matrix metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases during Japanese encephalitis virus infection (PubMed)

Circulating levels of matrix metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases during Japanese encephalitis virus infection Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are widely implicated in modulating blood brain barrier (BBB) integrity and affect the entry of peripheral immune cells into the central nervous system (CNS). The expression of MMPs is tightly regulated at the level of gene transcription, conversion of pro-enzyme to active MMPs and by the action of tissue inhibitors (...) of metalloproteinases (TIMP). The crucial role of MMPs in inflammation indicates that perturbation of the MMP/TIMP balance decisively plays an important role in pathogenesis during viral encephalitis. The study was performed to evaluate the production of MMP-2, MMP-7, MMP-9, TIMP-1 and TIMP-3 in the sera of JEV i.e. GP 78668A (GP-78) infected BALB/c mouse model of encephalitis and gel zymography was performed for MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities. The estimation of MMP-2, MMP-7, MMP-9, TIMP-1, and TIMP-3 in JEV-infected

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2016 Virusdisease

6. Japanese encephalitis: a review of clinical guidelines and vaccine availability in Asia (PubMed)

Japanese encephalitis: a review of clinical guidelines and vaccine availability in Asia Travelers to Asia are at risk for acquiring Japanese Encephalitis (JEV), an arbovirus with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Recent advances in vaccination resulting in vaccines with low rates of side effects have strengthened the rationale to vaccinate more travelers to this region, as reflected in many updated national guidelines for prevention of disease in travelers. Vaccines however still require (...) a complex pre-travel schedule and are costly, often leading to a requirement or desire for a vaccination option in the destination country. We explore current national guidelines for prevention of Japanese Encephalitis and seek to provide information on availability of JEV vaccines in various Asian countries.

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2015 Tropical diseases, travel medicine and vaccines

7. Japanese encephalitis prevention in travellers

Japanese encephalitis prevention in travellers clinical Reprinted from Aust RAli An F Amily Physici An Vol. 39, n o. 6, june 2010 389 Cora A Mayer Amy A Neilson Japanese encephalitis Prevention in travellers Guinea; and in the outer torres strait islands of Australia (Table 1). it was first detected in the outer torres strait following three cases on Badu island, two of which were fatal. one known case in western cape york was acquired on the Australian mainland, and evidence of je has been (...) of white matter, thalamus, brainstem and spinal cord. m ore than 75% of Japanese encephalitis (JE) is a serious arboviral disease caused by a flavivirus closely related to other flaviviruses such as West Nile, Murray Valley encephalitis and Kunjin (the latter two occur in Australia). Other well known flaviviral infections include yellow fever and dengue fever. 1 Japanese encephalitis is thought to be the most common form of encephalitis in the world today. 2 j apanese encephalitis is a zoonosis

2010 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

8. Vaccines for preventing Japanese encephalitis. (PubMed)

Vaccines for preventing Japanese encephalitis. Vaccination is recognized as the only practical measure for preventing Japanese encephalitis. Production shortage, costs, and issues of licensure impair vaccination programmes in many affected countries. Concerns over vaccine effectiveness and safety also have a negative impact on acceptance and uptake.To evaluate vaccines for preventing Japanese encephalitis in terms of effectiveness, adverse events, and immunogenicity.In March 2007, we searched (...) the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2007, Issue 1), MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, BIOSIS, and reference lists. We also attempted to contact corresponding authors and vaccine companies.Randomized controlled trials (RCTs), including cluster-RCTs, comparing Japanese encephalitis vaccines with placebo (inert agent or unrelated vaccine), no intervention, or alternative Japanese encephalitis vaccine.Authors independently extracted data and assessed methodological

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2007 Cochrane

9. Safety and immunogenicity of a Vero-cell-derived, inactivated Japanese encephalitis vaccine: a non-inferiority, phase III, randomised controlled trial. (PubMed)

Safety and immunogenicity of a Vero-cell-derived, inactivated Japanese encephalitis vaccine: a non-inferiority, phase III, randomised controlled trial. Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is the leading cause of viral encephalitis in southeast Asia. Although no treatment is currently available, vaccination effectively prevents the disease. In a non-inferiority study, we aimed to compare the safety and immunogenicity of a novel, second-generation, inactivated candidate vaccine for JEV

2007 Lancet

10. Interferon alfa-2a in Japanese encephalitis: a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled trial. (PubMed)

Interferon alfa-2a in Japanese encephalitis: a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled trial. Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), although confined to Asia, causes about 35000-50000 cases and 10000 deaths every year, and is the most important cause of encephalitis worldwide. There is no known antiviral treatment for any flavivirus. Results from in-vitro studies and work in animals have shown inteferon alfa has antiviral activity on Japanese encephalitis and other flaviviruses; therefore, we (...) aimed to assess the efficacy of inteferon alfa-2a in Japanese encephalitis.We did a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled trial of interferon alfa-2a (10 million units/m2, daily for 7 days) in 112 Vietnamese children with suspected Japanese encephalitis, 87 of whom had serologically confirmed infections. Our primary endpoints were hospital death or severe sequelae at discharge. Analysis was by intention to treat.Overall, 21 children (19%) died, and 17 (15%) had severe sequelae. Outcome

2003 Lancet

11. Cost-effectiveness of routine immunization to control Japanese encephalitis in Shanghai, China

Cost-effectiveness of routine immunization to control Japanese encephalitis in Shanghai, China Cost-effectiveness of routine immunization to control Japanese encephalitis in Shanghai, China Cost-effectiveness of routine immunization to control Japanese encephalitis in Shanghai, China Ding D, Kilgore P E, Clemens J D, Liu W, Xu Z Y Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary (...) published studies: the annual incidence of Japanese encephalitis; vaccination efficacy and adverse events per scheduled dose; fatality from Japanese encephalitis; the percentage of Japanese encephalitis cases with long-term disability; and the age-related disability adjustments. Study designs and other criteria for inclusion in the review Not reported. Sources searched to identify primary studies Not reported. Criteria used to ensure the validity of primary studies Not reported. Methods used to judge

2003 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

12. Efficacy of single-dose SA 14-14-2 vaccine against Japanese encephalitis: a case control study. (PubMed)

Efficacy of single-dose SA 14-14-2 vaccine against Japanese encephalitis: a case control study. In China, since 1989, an estimated 120 million children have been immunised with the SA 14-14-2 live-attenuated Japanese encephalitis (JE) vaccine at ages 1, 2, and 6 years. A case-control study of licensed vaccine found two doses to be 98% effective. Subsequently, researchers found that single-dose vaccine efficacy was high; we aimed to confirm this result.During July 11-24, 1999, 160000 doses of JE (...) definition and were resident in villages receiving the vaccine. None of 20 JE cases had received JE vaccine compared with 326 of 557 age-sex matched village controls. The efficacy of a single dose of JE vaccine was 99.3% (CI 94.9-100%).A single dose of JE vaccine is highly efficacious in preventing Japanese encephalitis when administered only days or weeks before exposure to infection.

2001 Lancet

13. Cost benefit analysis of Japanese encephalitis vaccination program in Thailand

Cost benefit analysis of Japanese encephalitis vaccination program in Thailand Cost benefit analysis of Japanese encephalitis vaccination program in Thailand Cost benefit analysis of Japanese encephalitis vaccination program in Thailand Siraprapasiri T, Sawaddiwudhipong W, Rojanasuphot S Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed (...) by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology Administering the Japanese encephalitis (JE) vaccination to children aged 18 months (given concurrently with the 4th dose of DTP, while the second dose administration would happen 1-2 weeks later) and 6 years (concurrently with the routine school immunisation programme). Type of intervention Primary prevention. Economic study type Cost-effectiveness analysis. Study population Children aged 18

1997 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

14. Protection against Japanese encephalitis by inactivated vaccines. (PubMed)

Protection against Japanese encephalitis by inactivated vaccines. Encephalitis caused by Japanese encephalitis virus occurs in annual epidemics throughout Asia, making it the principal cause of epidemic viral encephalitis in the world. No currently available vaccine has demonstrated efficacy in preventing this disease in a controlled trial. We performed a placebo-controlled, blinded, randomized trial in a northern Thai province, with two doses of monovalent (Nakayama strain) or bivalent (...) (Nakayama plus Beijing strains) inactivated, purified Japanese encephalitis vaccine made from whole virus derived from mouse brain. We examined the effect of these vaccines on the incidence and severity of Japanese encephalitis and dengue hemorrhagic fever, a disease caused by a closely related flavivirus. Between November 1984 and March 1985, 65,224 children received two doses of monovalent Japanese encephalitis vaccine (n = 21,628), bivalent Japanese encephalitis vaccine (n = 22,080), or tetanus

1988 NEJM