Latest & greatest articles for Infant Feeding

The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you wanted the latest trusted evidence on Infant Feeding or other clinical topics then use Trip today.

This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on Infant Feeding and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

What is Trip?

Trip is a clinical search engine designed to allow users to quickly and easily find and use high-quality research evidence to support their practice and/or care.

Trip has been online since 1997 and in that time has developed into the internet’s premier source of evidence-based content. Our motto is ‘Find evidence fast’ and this is something we aim to deliver for every single search.

As well as research evidence we also allow clinicians to search across other content types including images, videos, patient information leaflets, educational courses and news.

For further information on Trip click on any of the questions/sections on the left-hand side of this page. But if you still have questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com

Top results for Infant Feeding

1. Impact of a complementary feeding intervention and mother's perceptions of child weight status in infants. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Impact of a complementary feeding intervention and mother's perceptions of child weight status in infants. Introduction: if complementary feeding is not introduced at six months or if it is inadequate, the child's growth will be affected. Objective: to evaluate the impact of a complementary feeding intervention and the mothers' perceptions of child weight status (MPCW) on growth indicators. Method: this was a quasi-experimental intervention in 19 mother-child dyads with seven workshops given (...) to the intervention group (IG). Mothers were asked when, why, and how food groups should be introduced according to their beliefs and experience. Growth indicators were Z-scores for length-for-age (ZLA) and weight-for-length (ZWL). MPCW was measured using the question: "do you think your child is: 'a little underweight or underweight', 'more or less at a normal weight', 'a little overweight' or 'definitely overweight'?" Number of breastfed times, number of feeding times and minimal dietary diversity

2019 Nutricion hospitalaria Controlled trial quality: uncertain

2. Controlled Trial of Two Incremental Milk-Feeding Rates in Preterm Infants. (Abstract)

Controlled Trial of Two Incremental Milk-Feeding Rates in Preterm Infants. Observational data have shown that slow advancement of enteral feeding volumes in preterm infants is associated with a reduced risk of necrotizing enterocolitis but an increased risk of late-onset sepsis. However, data from randomized trials are limited.We randomly assigned very preterm or very-low-birth-weight infants to daily milk increments of 30 ml per kilogram of body weight (faster increment) or 18 ml per kilogram (...) (slower increment) until reaching full feeding volumes. The primary outcome was survival without moderate or severe neurodevelopmental disability at 24 months. Secondary outcomes included components of the primary outcome, confirmed or suspected late-onset sepsis, necrotizing enterocolitis, and cerebral palsy.Among 2804 infants who underwent randomization, the primary outcome could be assessed in 1224 (87.4%) assigned to the faster increment and 1246 (88.7%) assigned to the slower increment. Survival

2019 NEJM

3. The Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy infant feeding for allergy prevention guidelines

The Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy infant feeding for allergy prevention guidelines The Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy infant feeding for allergy prevention guidelines | The Medical Journal of Australia mja-search search Use the for more specific terms. Title contains Body contains Date range from Date range to Article type Author's surname Volume First page doi: 10.5694/mja__.______ Search Reset  close Individual Login Purchase options Connect (...) person_outline Login keyboard_arrow_down Individual Login Purchase options menu search Advertisement close The Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy infant feeding for allergy prevention guidelines Preeti A Joshi, Jill Smith, Sandra Vale and Dianne E Campbell Med J Aust 2019; 210 (2): . || doi: 10.5694/mja2.12102 Published online: 14 January 2019 Topics Abstract Introduction: The Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy, the peak professional body for clinical immunology

2019 MJA Clinical Guidelines

4. Formula versus maternal breast milk for feeding preterm or low birth weight infants. (Abstract)

Formula versus maternal breast milk for feeding preterm or low birth weight infants. Artificial formula can be manipulated to contain higher amounts of macro-nutrients than maternal breast milk but breast milk confers important immuno-nutritional advantages for preterm or low birth weight (LBW) infants.To determine the effect of feeding preterm or LBW infants with formula compared with maternal breast milk on growth and developmental outcomes.We used the standard strategy of Cochrane Neonatal (...) to search the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2018, Issue 9), and Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Embase, Ovid Maternity & Infant Care Database, and CINAHL to October 2018. We searched clinical trials databases, conference proceedings, and the reference lists of retrieved articles.Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials that compared feeding preterm or low birth weight infants with formula versus maternal breast milk.Two review authors planned independently to assess trial

2019 Cochrane

5. Formula versus donor breast milk for feeding preterm or low birth weight infants. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Formula versus donor breast milk for feeding preterm or low birth weight infants. When sufficient maternal breast milk is not available, alternative forms of enteral nutrition for preterm or low birth weight (LBW) infants are donor breast milk or artificial formula. Donor breast milk may retain some of the non-nutritive benefits of maternal breast milk for preterm or LBW infants. However, feeding with artificial formula may ensure more consistent delivery of greater amounts of nutrients (...) , 1675 infants).The GRADE certainty of evidence was moderate for rates of weight gain, linear growth, and head growth (downgraded for high levels of heterogeneity) and was moderate for neurodevelopmental disability, all-cause mortality, and necrotising enterocolitis (downgraded for imprecision).In preterm and LBW infants, moderate-certainty evidence indicates that feeding with formula compared with donor breast milk, either as a supplement to maternal expressed breast milk or as a sole diet, results

2019 Cochrane

6. Exposure to the smell and taste of milk to accelerate feeding in preterm infants. (Abstract)

Exposure to the smell and taste of milk to accelerate feeding in preterm infants. Preterm infants are often unable to co-ordinate sucking, swallowing and breathing for oral feeding because of their immaturity; in such cases, initial nutrition is provided by orogastric or nasogastric tube feeding. Feed intolerance is common and can delay attainment of full enteral feeds and sucking feeds, which prolongs the need for intravenous nutrition and hospital stay. Smell and taste play an important role (...) in the activation of physiological pre-absorptive processes that contribute to food digestion and absorption. However, during tube feedings, milk bypasses the nasal and oral cavities, which limits exposure to the smell and taste of milk. Provision of the smell and taste of milk with tube feedings is non-invasive and inexpensive; and if it does accelerate the transition to enteral feeds, and then to sucking feeds, it would be of considerable potential benefit to infants, their families, and the healthcare

2019 Cochrane

7. Re-feeding versus discarding gastric residuals to improve growth in preterm infants. (Abstract)

, and trophic substances that aid in digestion and promote gastrointestinal motility and maturation, re-feeding abnormal residuals may result in emesis, necrotising enterocolitis, or sepsis.To assess the efficacy and safety of re-feeding compared to discarding gastric residuals in preterm infants. The allocation should have been started in the first week of life and should have been continued at least until the baby reached full enteral feeds. The investigator could have chosen to discard the gastric (...) Re-feeding versus discarding gastric residuals to improve growth in preterm infants. Routine monitoring of gastric residuals in preterm infants on gavage feeds is a common practice in many neonatal intensive care units and is used to guide the initiation and advancement of feeds. No guidelines or consensus is available on whether to re-feed or discard the aspirated gastric residuals. Although re-feeding gastric residuals may replace partially digested milk, gastrointestinal enzymes, hormones

2019 Cochrane

8. Survival and Health Care Use After Feeding Tube Placement in Children With Neurologic Impairment Full Text available with Trip Pro

Survival and Health Care Use After Feeding Tube Placement in Children With Neurologic Impairment Children with neurologic impairment (NI) often undergo feeding tube placement for undernutrition or aspiration. We evaluated survival and acute health care use after tube placement in this population.This is a population-based exposure-crossover study for which we use linked administrative data from Ontario, Canada. We identified children aged 13 months to 17 years with a diagnosis of NI undergoing (...) feeding tube placement. However, the stability of health care use before and after the procedure suggests that the high mortality may reflect underlying fragility rather than increased risk from nonoral feeding. Further research to inform risk stratification and prognostic accuracy is needed.Copyright © 2019 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

2019 EvidenceUpdates

9. Influence of infant feeding on the excretion of gluten immunopeptides in feces. (Abstract)

Influence of infant feeding on the excretion of gluten immunopeptides in feces. the secretion of antigens from the diet into breast milk has been extensively documented. The transfer of gliadin could be critical for the development of an immune response.to investigate the presence of immunogenic gluten peptides in the feces of infants fed with different diets.a blind, prospective, controlled, collaborative study was performed in three hospitals, between September 2016 and January 2017 (...) both the experimental and control group 1. With regard to control group 2, the peptide 33-mer of gliadin was negative in 23% of cases (seven children). There was no difference in the amount of gluten ingested by these children compared to those who excreted the 33-mer peptide.the failure to detect gluten in the feces of infants that were exclusively breastfed indicates that it is probably below the limits of detection. Healthy children who consume gluten may not excrete it in feces.

2019 Revista espanola de enfermedades digestivas : organo oficial de la Sociedad Espanola de Patologia Digestiva Controlled trial quality: uncertain

10. Child health: Feeding preterm infants with formula rather than donor breast milk is associated with faster rates of short-term growth, but increased risk of developing necrotising enterocolitis

Child health: Feeding preterm infants with formula rather than donor breast milk is associated with faster rates of short-term growth, but increased risk of developing necrotising enterocolitis Feeding preterm infants with formula rather than donor breast milk is associated with faster rates of short-term growth, but increased risk of developing necrotising enterocolitis | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can (...) infants with formula rather than donor breast milk is associated with faster rates of short-term growth, but increased risk of developing necrotising enterocolitis Article Text Commentary Child health Feeding preterm infants with formula rather than donor breast milk is associated with faster rates of short-term growth, but increased risk of developing necrotising enterocolitis Karen Tosh Correspondence to Karen Tosh, School of Nursing and Health Sciences, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HJ, UK

2019 Evidence-Based Nursing

11. Gastric Residual Volume in Feeding Advancement in Preterm Infants (GRIP Study): A Randomized Trial (Abstract)

Gastric Residual Volume in Feeding Advancement in Preterm Infants (GRIP Study): A Randomized Trial To evaluate the effect of not relying on prefeeding gastric residual volumes to guide feeding advancement on the time to reach full feeding volumes in preterm infants, compared with routine measurement of gastric residual volumes. We hypothesized that not measuring prefeeding gastric residual volumes can shorten the time to reach full feeds.In this single-center, randomized, controlled trial, we (...) included gavage fed preterm infants with birth weights (BW) 1500-2000 g who were enrolled within 48 hours of birth. Exclusion criteria were major congenital malformations, asphyxia, and BW below the third percentile. In the study group, the gastric residual volume was measured only in the presence of bloody aspirates, vomiting, or an abnormal abdominal examination. In the control group, gastric residual volume was assessed routinely, and feeding advancement was based on the gastric residual volume

2018 EvidenceUpdates

12. HIV and infant feeding in emergencies: operational guidance

Purpose of this document The purpose of this document is to provide operational guidance on HIV and infant feeding in emergencies. It is intended to be used to complement emergency and sectoral guidelines on health, nutrition and HIV, including specifically IYCF, prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) and paediatric antiretroviral therapy (ART). It aims to support pregnant and lactating women living with HIV in feeding their HIV-exposed infants (0–11 months) and young children (12 (...) children, including issues around infant and young child feeding 27 4.2 Mothers living with HIV and feeding of their infants and young children 27 4.3 Operational gaps 27 5. Roles and responsibilities 28 5.1 Government 28 5.2 United Nations agencies 28 5.3 International and local nongovernmental organizations 29 5.4 Donors 29iv HIV AND INFANT FEEDING IN EMERGENCIES: OPERATIONAL GUIDANCE Annex 1: Meeting description 30 Annex 2: Country experiences 31 Annex 3: Extracts from Infant and young child feeding

2018 World Health Organisation Guidelines

13. Educational interventions for improving primary caregiver complementary feeding practices for children aged 24 months and under. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Educational interventions for improving primary caregiver complementary feeding practices for children aged 24 months and under. Although complementary feeding is a universal practice, the methods and manner in which it is practiced vary between cultures, individuals and socioeconomic classes. The period of complementary feeding is a critical time of transition in the life of an infant, and inappropriate complementary feeding practices, with their associated adverse health consequences, remain (...) a significant global public health problem. Educational interventions are widely acknowledged as effective in promoting public health strategy, and those aimed at improving complementary feeding practices provide information about proper complementary feeding practices to caregivers of infants/children. It is therefore important to summarise evidence on the effectiveness of educational interventions to improve the complementary feeding practices of caregivers of infants.To assess the effectiveness

2018 Cochrane

14. Decision-making around gastrostomy tube feeding in children with neurologic impairment: Engaging effectively with families

Decision-making around gastrostomy tube feeding in children with neurologic impairment: Engaging effectively with families Children with neurologic impairment may not be able to feed safely or sufficiently by mouth to maintain an adequate nutritional state. Gastrostomy tube (G-tube) feeding is an important, often essential, intervention in such situations. However, many parents and families struggle with the decision to proceed with G-tube feeding. This practice point reviews common reasons (...) for decisional conflict in parents and explores key aspects of life with G-tube feeding. A framework for shared decision-making and the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) approach are highlighted. Practical recommendations for clinicians on engaging with families for decision-making around this life-changing intervention are provided. Keywords: G-tube; ICF; Shared decision-making

2018 Canadian Paediatric Society

15. Costing of three feeding regimens for home-based management of children with uncomplicated severe acute malnutrition from a randomised trial in India Full Text available with Trip Pro

Costing of three feeding regimens for home-based management of children with uncomplicated severe acute malnutrition from a randomised trial in India Three feeding regimens-centrally produced ready-to-use therapeutic food, locally produced ready-to-use therapeutic food, and augmented, energy-dense, home-prepared food-were provided in a community setting for children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM) in the age group of 6-59 months in an individually randomised multicentre trial that enrolled (...) 906 children. Foods, counselling, feeding support and treatment for mild illnesses were provided until recovery or 16 weeks.Costs were estimated for 371 children enrolled in Delhi in a semiurban location after active survey and identification, enrolment, diagnosis and treatment for mild illnesses, and finally treatment with one of the three regimens, both under the research and government setting. Direct costs were estimated for human resources using a price times quantity approach, based

2018 BMJ global health Controlled trial quality: uncertain

16. Disorders of infant feeding

. Encyclopedia on early childhood development. March 2004. http://www.child-encyclopedia.com/ (last accessed 5 July 2017). http://www.child-encyclopedia.com/sites/default/files/textes-experts/en/535/assessment-and-treatment-of-pediatric-feeding-disorders.pdf Rommel N, De Meyer AM, Feenstra L, et al. The complexity of feeding problems in 700 infants and young children presenting to a tertiary care institution. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2003;37:75-84. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12827010?tool (...) =bestpractice.com Bernard-Bonnin AC. Feeding problems of infants and toddlers. Can Fam Physician. 2006;52:1247-1251. http://www.cfp.ca/content/52/10/1247.full.pdf http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17279184?tool=bestpractice.com Field D, Garland M, Williams K. Correlates of specific childhood feeding problems. J Paediatr Child Health. 2003;39:299-304. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12755939?tool=bestpractice.com History and exam age <1 year time taken to feed >30 minutes stressful mealtimes abnormal

2018 BMJ Best Practice

17. Effectiveness of Text Messaging Interventions Designed to Influence Parents? Infant Feeding Practices: A Focused Practice Question

to text message parents with the goal of influencing parents’ knowledge and behaviours around the feeding practices of their children. 2 Issue & Context Every year, approximately 15,000-16,000 babies are born in Peel (1) and their parents have access to many different information sources intended to help them raise their children with health as a priority. However, the credibility of these sources can vary greatly. Often this can lead to parents feeling overwhelmed with conflicting messages (...) that infants be introduced to solid foods at around six months of age, when a baby consistently demonstrates the signs of readiness for solid foods (4). However, parents are receiving conflicting advice on infant feeding (2) and local data indicate that almost a quarter of infants in Peel are being introduced to solid food too early (at less than five months of age) or too late (after 7 months of age) (5). This is an example of a health issue in which a text messaging intervention may be able to provide

2018 Peel Health Library

18. ASCIA Clinical Update Infant Feeding and Allergy Prevention

ASCIA Clinical Update Infant Feeding and Allergy Prevention 1 Infant Feeding and Allergy Prevention Clinical Update Background ASCIA Guidelines for infant feeding and allergy prevention were developed in 2016 to outline practices that may help reduce the risk of infants developing allergies, particularly early onset allergic diseases such as eczema and food allergy 1 . The reasons for the continued rise in allergic diseases such as food allergy and eczema are complex and not well understood (...) beverages are not recommended for infants as the main source of milk before 12 months of age. 2. Key recommendations for infant feeding and allergy prevention • When the infant is ready, at around 6 months, but not before 4 months, start to introduce a variety of solid foods, starting with iron rich foods, preferably whilst continuing to breastfeed. • All infants should be given the common food allergens (peanut, tree nuts, cow’s milk, egg, wheat, soy, sesame, fish and shellfish), including smooth

2018 Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy

19. High versus standard volume enteral feeds to promote growth in preterm or low birth weight infants. Full Text available with Trip Pro

High versus standard volume enteral feeds to promote growth in preterm or low birth weight infants. Breast milk alone, given at standard recommended volumes (150 to 180 mL/kg/d), is not adequate to meet the protein, energy, and other nutrient requirements of growing preterm or low birth weight infants. One strategy that may be used to address these potential nutrient deficits is to give infants enteral feeds in excess of 200 mL/kg/d ('high-volume' feeds). This approach may increase nutrient (...) uptake and growth rates, but concerns include that high-volume enteral feeds may cause feed intolerance, gastro-oesophageal reflux, aspiration pneumonia, necrotising enterocolitis, or complications related to fluid overload, including patent ductus arteriosus and bronchopulmonary dysplasia.To assess the effect on growth and safety of feeding preterm or low birth weight infants with high (> 200 mL/kg/d) versus standard (≤ 200 mL/kg/d) volume of enteral feeds. Infants in intervention and control groups

2017 Cochrane

20. Effect of a Baby-Led Approach to Complementary Feeding on Infant Growth and Overweight: A Randomized Clinical Trial Full Text available with Trip Pro

, 0.07 to 0.43) at 12 months in BLISS infants. Estimated differences in energy intake were 55 kJ (95% CI, -284 to 395 kJ) at 12 months and 143 kJ (95% CI, -241 to 526 kJ) at 24 months.A baby-led approach to complementary feeding did not result in more appropriate BMI than traditional spoon-feeding, although children were reported to have less food fussiness. Further research should determine whether these findings apply to individuals using unmodified baby-led weaning.http://anzctr.org.au Identifier (...) Effect of a Baby-Led Approach to Complementary Feeding on Infant Growth and Overweight: A Randomized Clinical Trial Baby-led approaches to complementary feeding, which promote self-feeding of all nonliquid foods are proposed to improve energy self-regulation and lower obesity risk. However, to date, no randomized clinical trials have studied this proposition.To determine whether a baby-led approach to complementary feeding results in a lower body mass index (BMI) than traditional spoon

2017 EvidenceUpdates