Latest & greatest articles for Infant Feeding

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Top results for Infant Feeding

1. Controlled Trial of Two Incremental Milk-Feeding Rates in Preterm Infants. (PubMed)

Controlled Trial of Two Incremental Milk-Feeding Rates in Preterm Infants. Observational data have shown that slow advancement of enteral feeding volumes in preterm infants is associated with a reduced risk of necrotizing enterocolitis but an increased risk of late-onset sepsis. However, data from randomized trials are limited.We randomly assigned very preterm or very-low-birth-weight infants to daily milk increments of 30 ml per kilogram of body weight (faster increment) or 18 ml per kilogram (...) (slower increment) until reaching full feeding volumes. The primary outcome was survival without moderate or severe neurodevelopmental disability at 24 months. Secondary outcomes included components of the primary outcome, confirmed or suspected late-onset sepsis, necrotizing enterocolitis, and cerebral palsy.Among 2804 infants who underwent randomization, the primary outcome could be assessed in 1224 (87.4%) assigned to the faster increment and 1246 (88.7%) assigned to the slower increment. Survival

2019 NEJM

2. The Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy infant feeding for allergy prevention guidelines

The Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy infant feeding for allergy prevention guidelines The Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy infant feeding for allergy prevention guidelines | The Medical Journal of Australia mja-search search Use the for more specific terms. Title contains Body contains Date range from Date range to Article type Author's surname Volume First page doi: 10.5694/mja__.______ Search Reset  close Individual Login Purchase options Connect (...) person_outline Login keyboard_arrow_down Individual Login Purchase options menu search Advertisement close The Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy infant feeding for allergy prevention guidelines Preeti A Joshi, Jill Smith, Sandra Vale and Dianne E Campbell Med J Aust 2019; 210 (2): . || doi: 10.5694/mja2.12102 Published online: 14 January 2019 Topics Abstract Introduction: The Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy, the peak professional body for clinical immunology

2019 MJA Clinical Guidelines

3. Formula versus maternal breast milk for feeding preterm or low birth weight infants. (PubMed)

Formula versus maternal breast milk for feeding preterm or low birth weight infants. Artificial formula can be manipulated to contain higher amounts of macro-nutrients than maternal breast milk but breast milk confers important immuno-nutritional advantages for preterm or low birth weight (LBW) infants.To determine the effect of feeding preterm or LBW infants with formula compared with maternal breast milk on growth and developmental outcomes.We used the standard strategy of Cochrane Neonatal (...) to search the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2018, Issue 9), and Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Embase, Ovid Maternity & Infant Care Database, and CINAHL to October 2018. We searched clinical trials databases, conference proceedings, and the reference lists of retrieved articles.Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials that compared feeding preterm or low birth weight infants with formula versus maternal breast milk.Two review authors planned independently to assess trial

2019 Cochrane

4. Formula versus donor breast milk for feeding preterm or low birth weight infants. (PubMed)

Formula versus donor breast milk for feeding preterm or low birth weight infants. When sufficient maternal breast milk is not available, alternative forms of enteral nutrition for preterm or low birth weight (LBW) infants are donor breast milk or artificial formula. Donor breast milk may retain some of the non-nutritive benefits of maternal breast milk for preterm or LBW infants. However, feeding with artificial formula may ensure more consistent delivery of greater amounts of nutrients (...) , 1675 infants).The GRADE certainty of evidence was moderate for rates of weight gain, linear growth, and head growth (downgraded for high levels of heterogeneity) and was moderate for neurodevelopmental disability, all-cause mortality, and necrotising enterocolitis (downgraded for imprecision).In preterm and LBW infants, moderate-certainty evidence indicates that feeding with formula compared with donor breast milk, either as a supplement to maternal expressed breast milk or as a sole diet, results

2019 Cochrane

5. Exposure to the smell and taste of milk to accelerate feeding in preterm infants. (PubMed)

Exposure to the smell and taste of milk to accelerate feeding in preterm infants. Preterm infants are often unable to co-ordinate sucking, swallowing and breathing for oral feeding because of their immaturity; in such cases, initial nutrition is provided by orogastric or nasogastric tube feeding. Feed intolerance is common and can delay attainment of full enteral feeds and sucking feeds, which prolongs the need for intravenous nutrition and hospital stay. Smell and taste play an important role (...) in the activation of physiological pre-absorptive processes that contribute to food digestion and absorption. However, during tube feedings, milk bypasses the nasal and oral cavities, which limits exposure to the smell and taste of milk. Provision of the smell and taste of milk with tube feedings is non-invasive and inexpensive; and if it does accelerate the transition to enteral feeds, and then to sucking feeds, it would be of considerable potential benefit to infants, their families, and the healthcare

2019 Cochrane

6. Re-feeding versus discarding gastric residuals to improve growth in preterm infants. (PubMed)

Re-feeding versus discarding gastric residuals to improve growth in preterm infants. Routine monitoring of gastric residuals in preterm infants on gavage feeds is a common practice in many neonatal intensive care units and is used to guide the initiation and advancement of feeds. No guidelines or consensus is available on whether to re-feed or discard the aspirated gastric residuals. Although re-feeding gastric residuals may replace partially digested milk, gastrointestinal enzymes, hormones (...) , and trophic substances that aid in digestion and promote gastrointestinal motility and maturation, re-feeding abnormal residuals may result in emesis, necrotising enterocolitis, or sepsis.To assess the efficacy and safety of re-feeding compared to discarding gastric residuals in preterm infants. The allocation should have been started in the first week of life and should have been continued at least until the baby reached full enteral feeds. The investigator could have chosen to discard the gastric

2019 Cochrane

7. Influence of infant feeding on the excretion of gluten immunopeptides in feces. (PubMed)

Influence of infant feeding on the excretion of gluten immunopeptides in feces. the secretion of antigens from the diet into breast milk has been extensively documented. The transfer of gliadin could be critical for the development of an immune response.to investigate the presence of immunogenic gluten peptides in the feces of infants fed with different diets.a blind, prospective, controlled, collaborative study was performed in three hospitals, between September 2016 and January 2017 (...) . The study protocol was approved by the Ethics Committee of the hospitals in Seville prior to starting the study.the cohort was divided into three groups of 30 infants: an experimental group (average age 9.2 ± 2.8 weeks) with exclusive breastfeeding, a control group 1 (average age 10.3 ± 3.3 weeks) exclusively fed with onset formula and a control group 2 (average age 56 ± 3.7 weeks) with infants that consumed gluten on a regular basis. The peptide 33-mer of gliadin was negative in all feces samples from

2019 Revista espanola de enfermedades digestivas : organo oficial de la Sociedad Espanola de Patologia Digestiva

8. How do smartphone applications targeted to parents of breastfed infants provide support in the context of inadequate frequency and/or duration of feeding?

How do smartphone applications targeted to parents of breastfed infants provide support in the context of inadequate frequency and/or duration of feeding? Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content

2019 PROSPERO

9. Cost and cost-effectiveness analysis of donor human milk versus standard feeding in infants in neonatal care: a systematic review

Cost and cost-effectiveness analysis of donor human milk versus standard feeding in infants in neonatal care: a systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record

2019 PROSPERO

10. Evidence for feeding practices in very low birthweight infants in sub-Saharan Africa: an overview of systematic reviews

Evidence for feeding practices in very low birthweight infants in sub-Saharan Africa: an overview of systematic reviews Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any

2019 PROSPERO

11. Prevalence of expressed breast milk feeding and the health outcome of infants. A systematic review

Prevalence of expressed breast milk feeding and the health outcome of infants. A systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external

2019 PROSPERO

12. Women, family, practitioners and service providers' views about infant feeding (breastfeeding, use of breast milk substitutes or mixed feeding), when a mother or infant is known or suspected of having a transmissible disease: a best fit framework synthesi

Women, family, practitioners and service providers' views about infant feeding (breastfeeding, use of breast milk substitutes or mixed feeding), when a mother or infant is known or suspected of having a transmissible disease: a best fit framework synthesi Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied

2019 PROSPERO

13. Maternal-focused interventions to improve infant feeding and nutrition: a systematic review of reviews

Maternal-focused interventions to improve infant feeding and nutrition: a systematic review of reviews Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files

2019 PROSPERO

14. Integrating Infant and Young Child Feeding (IYCF) interventions into immunization programmes for children under two: a systematic review

Integrating Infant and Young Child Feeding (IYCF) interventions into immunization programmes for children under two: a systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration

2019 PROSPERO

15. Gastric Residual Volume in Feeding Advancement in Preterm Infants (GRIP Study): A Randomized Trial

Gastric Residual Volume in Feeding Advancement in Preterm Infants (GRIP Study): A Randomized Trial To evaluate the effect of not relying on prefeeding gastric residual volumes to guide feeding advancement on the time to reach full feeding volumes in preterm infants, compared with routine measurement of gastric residual volumes. We hypothesized that not measuring prefeeding gastric residual volumes can shorten the time to reach full feeds.In this single-center, randomized, controlled trial, we (...) included gavage fed preterm infants with birth weights (BW) 1500-2000 g who were enrolled within 48 hours of birth. Exclusion criteria were major congenital malformations, asphyxia, and BW below the third percentile. In the study group, the gastric residual volume was measured only in the presence of bloody aspirates, vomiting, or an abnormal abdominal examination. In the control group, gastric residual volume was assessed routinely, and feeding advancement was based on the gastric residual volume

2018 EvidenceUpdates

16. HIV and infant feeding in emergencies: operational guidance

HIV and infant feeding in emergencies: operational guidance The duration of breastfeeding and support from health services to improve feeding practices among mothers living with HIV HIV AND INFANT FEEDING IN EMERGENCIES: OPERATIONAL GUIDANCEHIV and infant feeding in emergencies: operational guidance© World Health Organization 2018 Some rights reserved. This work is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 IGO licence (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 IGO; https (...) . HIV and infant feeding in emergencies: operational guidance. Geneva: World Health Organization; 2018. Licence: CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 IGO. Cataloguing-in-Publication (CIP) data. CIP data are available at http://apps.who.int/iris. Sales, rights and licensing. To purchase WHO publications, see http://apps.who.int/bookorders. To submit requests for commercial use and queries on rights and licensing, see http://www.who.int/about/licensing. Third-party materials. If you wish to reuse material from this work

2018 World Health Organisation Guidelines

17. Formula versus donor breast milk for feeding preterm or low birth weight infants. (PubMed)

Formula versus donor breast milk for feeding preterm or low birth weight infants. When sufficient maternal breast milk is not available, alternative forms of enteral nutrition for preterm or low birth weight (LBW) infants are donor breast milk or artificial formula. Donor breast milk may retain some of the non-nutritive benefits of maternal breast milk for preterm or LBW infants. However, feeding with artificial formula may ensure more consistent delivery of greater amounts of nutrients (...) for neurodevelopmental disability, all-cause mortality, and necrotising enterocolitis (downgraded for imprecision).In preterm and LBW infants, feeding with formula compared with donor breast milk, either as a supplement to maternal expressed breast milk or as a sole diet, results in higher rates of weight gain, linear growth, and head growth and a higher risk of developing necrotising enterocolitis. The trial data do not show an effect on all-cause mortality, or on long-term growth or neurodevelopment.

2018 Cochrane

18. Effectiveness of Text Messaging Interventions Designed to Influence Parents? Infant Feeding Practices: A Focused Practice Question

Effectiveness of Text Messaging Interventions Designed to Influence Parents? Infant Feeding Practices: A Focused Practice Question Effectiveness of Text Messaging Interventions Designed to Influence Parents’ Infant Feeding Practices A Focused Practice Question Sarah Lamontagne, Public Health Nutritionist Nicole Labrie, Supervisor February 2017 i Table of Contents Key Messages 1 Issue & Context 2 Literature Review Question 3 Literature Search 4 Relevance Assessment 4 Results of the Search 5 (...) information that results in improved health outcomes and/or changed health behaviors. 2. There is limited research on text messaging specifically to the target audience of parents with the goal of influencing their infant feeding practices. 3. Breastfeeding initiation and breastfeeding exclusivity maintenance can be improved with the use of text messaging interventions for parents. 4. The limited research available supports Peel Public Health in pursuing the development and evaluation of an intervention

2018 Peel Health Library

19. Disorders of infant feeding

Disorders of infant feeding Disorders of infant feeding - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Disorders of infant feeding Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: March 2018 Summary Common in children under 1 year of age. Causative conditions may persist, leading to ongoing feeding difficulties during childhood. Results in the inadequate intake or intolerance of fluids or nutrients necessary to meet (...) are guided by physical findings and severity of symptoms. Feeding disorders are usually subacute to chronic in nature. A sudden change in feeding habit may be associated with other conditions, notably infections, which need to be excluded. Definition Conditions that lead to inadequate intake or intolerance of fluids and nutrients in infants under 1 year of age. Milnes SM, Piazza CC, Carroll-Hernandez TA. Assessment and treatment of pediatric feeding disorders. Encyclopedia on early childhood development

2018 BMJ Best Practice

20. Feed thickener for infants up to six months of age with gastro-oesophageal reflux. (Full text)

Feed thickener for infants up to six months of age with gastro-oesophageal reflux. Gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) is common in infants, and feed thickeners are often used to manage it in infants as they are simple to use and perceived to be harmless. However, conflicting evidence exists to support the use of feed thickeners.To evaluate the use of feed thickeners in infants up to six months of age with GOR in terms of reduction in a) signs and symptoms of GOR, b) reflux episodes on pH probe (...) for randomised controlled trials.We included randomised controlled trials if they examined the effects of feed thickeners as compared to unthickened feeds (no treatment or placebo) in treating GOR in term infants up to six months of age or six months of corrected gestational age for those born preterm.Two review authors independently identified eligible studies from the literature search. Two review authors independently performed data extraction and quality assessments of the eligible studies. Differences

2017 Cochrane PubMed