Latest & greatest articles for Hypersensitivity Reaction

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Top results for Hypersensitivity Reaction

1. Canadian expert consensus: management of hypersensitivity reactions to intravenous iron in adults

Canadian expert consensus: management of hypersensitivity reactions to intravenous iron in adults Canadian expert consensus: management of hypersensitivity reactions to intravenous iron in adults - Lim - - Vox Sanguinis - Wiley Online Library The full text of this article hosted at iucr.org is unavailable due to technical difficulties.

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2019 CPG Infobase

2. Ferumoxytol: risk of serious hypersensitivity reactions?contraindicated if any drug allergy

Ferumoxytol: risk of serious hypersensitivity reactions?contraindicated if any drug allergy Ferumoxytol: risk of serious hypersensitivity reactions—contraindicated if any drug allergy; administer via infusion - GOV.UK GOV.UK uses cookies to make the site simpler. or Search Ferumoxytol: risk of serious hypersensitivity reactions—contraindicated if any drug allergy; administer via infusion New recommendations are being introduced to minimise the risk of serious hypersensitivity reactions (...) with ferumoxytol. Published 11 December 2014 From: Therapeutic area: , Contents Update The licence-holder of ferumoxytol (Rienso) has voluntarily withdrawn it from the UK market. Please see the sent on 12 March 2015. Article date: September 2014 Hypersensitivity reactions are known to occur rarely with all intravenous (IV) iron products and may be life-threatening. Recommendations to manage and minimise this risk were strengthened in 2013 following an EU review (see Drug Safety Update article from ). Risk

2014 MHRA Drug Safety Update

3. Intravenous iron and serious hypersensitivity reactions

Intravenous iron and serious hypersensitivity reactions Intravenous iron and serious hypersensitivity reactions - GOV.UK GOV.UK uses cookies to make the site simpler. or Search Intravenous iron and serious hypersensitivity reactions Clarification of advice on new recommendations regarding initial test dose. Published 11 December 2014 From: Therapeutic area: , Article date: September 2013 We would like to make you aware that on 9 September 2013, we updated the information in the recent published

2013 MHRA Drug Safety Update

4. Intravenous iron and serious hypersensitivity reactions: strengthened recommendations

Intravenous iron and serious hypersensitivity reactions: strengthened recommendations Intravenous iron and serious hypersensitivity reactions: strengthened recommendations - GOV.UK GOV.UK uses cookies to make the site simpler. or Search Intravenous iron and serious hypersensitivity reactions: strengthened recommendations New strengthened recommendations to manage and minimise risk. Published 11 December 2014 From: Therapeutic area: , Contents Article date: August 2013 Intravenous (IV) iron (...) products are indicated in the treatment of iron deficiency and anaemia when iron supplements cannot be given or have not worked. Hypersensitivity reactions are well known to occur rarely with IV iron products, and may be life-threatening or fatal. Warnings about this risk are given in the product information. European review A European review of IV iron products has taken place after concerns in France about the risk of serious hypersensitivity reactions, especially in pregnant women. The review has

2013 MHRA Drug Safety Update

5. HLA-A*3101 and carbamazepine-induced hypersensitivity reactions in Europeans. (PubMed)

HLA-A*3101 and carbamazepine-induced hypersensitivity reactions in Europeans. Carbamazepine causes various forms of hypersensitivity reactions, ranging from maculopapular exanthema to severe blistering reactions. The HLA-B*1502 allele has been shown to be strongly correlated with carbamazepine-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS-TEN) in the Han Chinese and other Asian populations but not in European populations.We performed a genomewide association study (...) ), maculopapular exanthema (odds ratio, 8.33; 95% CI, 3.59 to 19.36), and SJS-TEN (odds ratio, 25.93; 95% CI, 4.93 to 116.18).The presence of the HLA-A*3101 allele was associated with carbamazepine-induced hypersensitivity reactions among subjects of Northern European ancestry. The presence of the allele increased the risk from 5.0% to 26.0%, whereas its absence reduced the risk from 5.0% to 3.8%. (Funded by the U.K. Department of Health and others.).

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2011 NEJM

6. Prasugrel (Efient?): rare but serious hypersensitivity reactions

Prasugrel (Efient?): rare but serious hypersensitivity reactions Prasugrel (Efient▼): rare but serious hypersensitivity reactions - GOV.UK GOV.UK uses cookies to make the site simpler. or Search Prasugrel (Efient▼): rare but serious hypersensitivity reactions Healthcare professionals should be aware of this risk when prescribing prasugrel. Published 11 December 2014 From: Therapeutic area: Article date: May 2011 Prasugrel is a thienopyridine, belonging to the same class of medicines (...) reactions including, very rarely, angioedema. As at April 2011, 9 such cases have been reported worldwide in association with use in approximately 727 000 patients. Some cases have occurred in patients with a known history of hypersensitivity to clopidogrel, but others have no history of clopidogrel exposure. At present, the mechanism for these allergic reactions is unclear. The time to onset of symptoms ranged from immediately after treatment to up to 5 to 10 days later. Advice for healthcare

2011 MHRA Drug Safety Update

7. Bevacizumab (Avastin): hypersensitivity and infusion reactions

Bevacizumab (Avastin): hypersensitivity and infusion reactions Bevacizumab (Avastin): hypersensitivity and infusion reactions - GOV.UK GOV.UK uses cookies to make the site simpler. or Search Bevacizumab (Avastin): hypersensitivity and infusion reactions Infusion reactions and hypersensitivity reactions have been reported commonly during treatment with Avastin. Published 11 December 2014 From: Therapeutic area: Article date: June 2010 Bevacizumab (Avastin) is a monoclonal antibody, which (...) inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor and is authorised for the treatment of various metastatic cancers. Healthcare professionals are advised to be aware that infusion reactions and hypersensitivity reactions have been reported commonly (≥1/100–<1/10) during treatment with Avastin. The incidence of such reactions is estimated to be up to 5% in clinical trials. Symptoms reported have included dyspnoea, flushing, rash, hypotension or hypertension, oxygen desaturation, chest pain, rigors, and nausea

2010 MHRA Drug Safety Update

8. Panitumumab (Vectibix): serious hypersensitivity reactions

Panitumumab (Vectibix): serious hypersensitivity reactions Panitumumab (Vectibix): serious hypersensitivity reactions - GOV.UK GOV.UK uses cookies to make the site simpler. or Search Panitumumab (Vectibix): serious hypersensitivity reactions New reports of serious hypersensitivity reactions (including anaphylaxis) in patients receiving panitumumab, some of which were fatal. Published 11 December 2014 From: Therapeutic area: Article date: May 2010 Panitumumab (Vectibix) is indicated (...) as monotherapy for the treatment of patients with EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor)-expressing metastatic colorectal carcinoma with non-mutated (wild type) KRAS after failure of chemotherapy regimens. There have been new reports of serious hypersensitivity reactions (including anaphylaxis) in patients receiving panitumumab, some of which were fatal. A clinical trial report has been received of a fatal case of angioedema occurring 2 days after exposure following a prior episode of angioedema which

2010 MHRA Drug Safety Update

9. Hypersensitivity reactions to human papillomavirus vaccine in Australian schoolgirls: retrospective cohort study. (PubMed)

Hypersensitivity reactions to human papillomavirus vaccine in Australian schoolgirls: retrospective cohort study. To describe the outcomes of clinical evaluation, skin testing, and vaccine challenge in adolescent schoolgirls with suspected hypersensitivity to the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine introduced in Australian schools in 2007.Retrospective cohort study.Two tertiary paediatric allergy centres in Victoria and South Australia, Australia.35 schoolgirls aged 12 to 18.9 years (...) with suspected hypersensitivity reactions to the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine.Clinical review and skin prick and intradermal testing with the quadrivalent vaccine and subsequent challenge with the vaccine.35 schoolgirls with suspected hypersensitivity to the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine were notified to the specialised immunisation services in 2007, after more than 380 000 doses had been administered in schools. Of these 35 schoolgirls, 25 agreed to further evaluation. Twenty three

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2008 BMJ

10. Paclitaxel hypersensitivity reactions: assessment of the utility of a test-dose program

Paclitaxel hypersensitivity reactions: assessment of the utility of a test-dose program Paclitaxel hypersensitivity reactions: assessment of the utility of a test-dose program Paclitaxel hypersensitivity reactions: assessment of the utility of a test-dose program Henry A, Charpiat B, Perol M, Vial T, De Saint Hilaire P J, Descotes J Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary (...) of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology Cancer patients prescribed paclitaxel were initially given a test dose before the first and second cycles of paclitaxel chemotherapy, to see whether they experienced hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs). The test dose consisted of a 12 mg dose prepared in 10 mL of normal saline and infused intravenously over 6 minutes. The patients were observed

2006 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

11. Drug provocation tests in patients with a history suggesting an immediate drug hypersensitivity reaction. (PubMed)

Drug provocation tests in patients with a history suggesting an immediate drug hypersensitivity reaction. Drug hypersensitivity reactions are common and can be life-threatening. Confirmation of the diagnosis should be rigorous and based on clinical history and a physical examination, possibly followed by skin tests and drug provocation tests.To describe the outcome of drug provocation tests in evaluating patients with histories suggesting drug allergy.Retrospective analysis of clinic case (...) series.The department for drug allergy at a university hospital.898 consecutive patients with suspected immediate drug allergy referred to the clinic between September 1996 and August 2001. Patients with severe skin reactions and those with positive results on skin tests for beta-lactams were excluded.Single-blinded administration of increasing doses of the suspected drug, up to the usual daily dose, under strict hospital surveillance.1372 drug provocation tests were performed using various drugs

2004 Annals of Internal Medicine

12. Delayed drug hypersensitivity reactions. (PubMed)

Delayed drug hypersensitivity reactions. Immune reactions to small molecular compounds, such as drugs, can cause a variety of diseases involving the skin, liver, kidney, and lungs. In many drug hypersensitivity reactions, drug-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells recognize drugs through their alphabeta T-cell receptors in an MHC-dependent way. Drugs stimulate T cells if they act as haptens and bind covalently to peptides or if they have structural features that allow them to interact with certain T (...) reactions through the release of various cytokines (for example, interleukin-5, interferon) and chemokines (such as interleukin-8). Activation of T cells with a particular function seems to lead to a specific clinical picture (for example, bullous or pustular exanthema). Taken together, these data allow delayed hypersensitivity reactions (type IV) to be further subclassified into T-cell reactions, which through the release of certain cytokines and chemokines preferentially activate and recruit monocytes

2003 Annals of Internal Medicine

13. Genetic variations in HLA-B region and hypersensitivity reactions to abacavir. (PubMed)

Genetic variations in HLA-B region and hypersensitivity reactions to abacavir. Hypersensitivity to abacavir affects about 4% of patients who receive the drug for HIV-1 infection. We did a retrospective, case-control study to identify multiple markers in the vicinity of HLA-B associated with hypersensitivity reactions. HLA-B57 was present in 39 (46%) of 84 patients versus four (4%) of 113 controls (p<0 small middle dot0001). However, because of low numbers of women and other ethnic groups (...) enrolled, these findings relate largely to white men. The lower sensitivity of HLA-B57 for predicting hypersensitivity to abacavir identified in this study compared with a previous report highlights that predictive values for markers will vary across populations. Clinical monitoring and management of hypersensitivity reactions among patients receiving abacavir must remain unchanged.

2002 Lancet