Latest & greatest articles for Hip Injection

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Top results for Hip Injection

1. The efficacy of intraoperative periarticular injection in Total hip arthroplasty: a systematic review and meta-analysis

The efficacy of intraoperative periarticular injection in Total hip arthroplasty: a systematic review and meta-analysis Periarticular injection (PAI) is a regional analgesia method performed in total hip arthroplasty (THA) for postoperative pain relief. However, its efficacy and safety is still inconclusive. Therefore, we conducted this meta-analysis to assess the safety of PAI and to determine if PAI provides better pain relief and reduce the consumption of opioids after THA.We searched PubMed

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2019 EvidenceUpdates

2. Intramuscular glucocorticoid injection versus placebo injection in hip osteoarthritis: a 12-week blinded randomised controlled trial

Intramuscular glucocorticoid injection versus placebo injection in hip osteoarthritis: a 12-week blinded randomised controlled trial Guidelines recommend intra-articular glucocorticoid injection in patients with painful hip osteoarthritis. However, intra-articular hip injection is an invasive procedure. The efficacy of systemic glucocorticoid treatment for pain reduction in hip osteoarthritis is unknown. This randomised, double-blind, trial assessed effectiveness in hip pain reduction (...) of an intramuscular glucocorticoid injection compared with a placebo injection in patients with hip osteoarthritis.Patients with painful hip osteoarthritis were randomised to either 40 mg triamcinolone acetate or placebo with an intramuscular injection into the gluteus muscle. The primary outcomes were severity of hip pain at rest, during walking (0-10) and WOMAC pain at 2-week postinjection. We used linear mixed models for repeated measurements at 2, 4, 6 and 12 weeks for the intention-to-treat data analysis.Of

2018 EvidenceUpdates

3. In adults with lateral hip pain post Total Hip Replacement (THR) (anterior lateral approach), is physiotherapy more effective in reducing pain and improving function than corticosteroid injection?

In adults with lateral hip pain post Total Hip Replacement (THR) (anterior lateral approach), is physiotherapy more effective in reducing pain and improving function than corticosteroid injection? Getting Evidence into Clinical Practice: Musculoskeletal Research Facilitation Group (CAT Group) Date: February 2017 CAT Lead: Tandi Coetzee/Treena Larkin Date CAT completed: February 2017 Date CAT to review: February 2019 Email: Treena.Larkin@nhs.net Specific Question: In adults with lateral hip pain (...) post Total Hip Replacement (THR) (anterior lateral approach), is physiotherapy more effective in reducing pain and improving function than corticosteroid injection? Clinical bottom line Search results produced no studies comparing physiotherapy intervention and corticosteroid injection to improve pain or function in adults with lateral hip pain post THR. Current clinical practice should remain unchanged due to the lack of evidence. Why is this important? Lateral hip pain occurs in 4.4 % of post

2018 Public Health England

4. Continuous Posterior Lumbar Plexus Nerve Block Versus Periarticular Injection with Ropivacaine or Liposomal Bupivacaine for Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Three-Arm Randomized Clinical Trial

Continuous Posterior Lumbar Plexus Nerve Block Versus Periarticular Injection with Ropivacaine or Liposomal Bupivacaine for Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Three-Arm Randomized Clinical Trial Debate surrounds the issue of whether peripheral nerve blockade or periarticular infiltration (PAI) should be employed within a contemporary, comprehensive multimodal analgesia pathway for total hip arthroplasty. We hypothesized that patients treated with a continuous posterior lumbar plexus block (PNB) would (...) report less pain and consume less opioid medication than those treated with PAI.This investigator-initiated, independently funded, 3-arm randomized clinical trial (RCT) performed at a single high-volume institution compared postoperative analgesia interventions for elective, unilateral primary total hip arthroplasty: (1) PNB; (2) PAI with ropivacaine, ketorolac, and epinephrine (PAI-R); and (3) PAI with liposomal bupivacaine, ketorolac, and epinephrine (PAI-L) using computerized randomization

2018 EvidenceUpdates

5. Preoperative Hip Injections Increase the Rate of Periprosthetic Infection After Total Hip Arthroplasty (PubMed)

Preoperative Hip Injections Increase the Rate of Periprosthetic Infection After Total Hip Arthroplasty Intraarticular injections are both diagnostic and therapeutic for patients with osteoarthritis. A potential risk of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) after total hip arthroplasty (THA) may occur from direct inoculation and/or immune suppression by corticosteroids. Large population-level databases were used to evaluate hip injection on the 1-year rate of PJI in patients undergoing primary (...) : 1395 (1.1%) of patients after 6-12 months, 1863 patients after 3-6 months, and 2163 (1.2%) after 0-3 months. In the 0-3 month group, PJI was significantly increased at 3 months (1.58%, P = .015), 6 months (1.76%, P = .022), and 1 year (2.04%, P = .031) compared with the noninjection control group (1.04%, 1.21%, and 1.47%, respectively). There were no differences in the 3- to 6-month and 6- to 12-month injection groups.There is an increased risk of PJI when THA is performed within 3 months of hip

2016 EvidenceUpdates

6. A regime of two intravenous injections of tranexamic acid reduces blood loss in minimally invasive total hip arthroplasty: a prospective randomised double-blind study (PubMed)

A regime of two intravenous injections of tranexamic acid reduces blood loss in minimally invasive total hip arthroplasty: a prospective randomised double-blind study Tranexamic acid (TXA), an inhibitor of fibrinolysis, reduces blood loss after total knee arthroplasty. However, its effect on minimally invasive total hip arthroplasty (THA) is not clear. We performed a prospective, randomised double-blind study to evaluate the effect of two intravenous injections of TXA on blood loss in patients (...) undergoing minimally invasive THA. In total, 60 patients (35 women and 25 men with a mean age of 58.1 years; 17 to 84) who underwent unilateral minimally invasive uncemented THA were randomly divided into the study group (30 patients, 20 women and ten men with a mean age of 56.5 years; 17 to 79) that received two intravenous injections 1 g of TXA pre- and post-operatively (TXA group), and a placebo group (30 patients, 15 women and 15 men with a mean age of 59.5 years; 23 to 84). We compared the peri

2015 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: uncertain

7. Can a Periarticular Levobupivacaine Injection Reduce Postoperative Opiate Consumption During Primary Hip Arthroplasty? (PubMed)

Can a Periarticular Levobupivacaine Injection Reduce Postoperative Opiate Consumption During Primary Hip Arthroplasty? Several reports have confirmed the ability of intraoperative periarticular injections to control pain after THA. However, these studies used differing combinations of analgesic agents and the contribution of each, including the local anesthetic agent, is uncertain. Understanding the independent effects of the various agents could assist in improved pain management after (...) in the levobupivacaine group, most notable in the first 12 hours after surgery: treatment group 11.5 mg vs control group 21.2 mg. We observed no differences in the frequency of postoperative nausea and vomiting or urinary retention.Our observations suggest periarticular injection of levobupivacaine can supplement available postoperative analgesic techniques and reduce postoperative morphine requirements after THA.Level I, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

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2012 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: predicted high

8. Pre-operative injections of epoetin-{alpha} versus post-operative retransfusion of autologous shed blood in total hip and knee replacement (PubMed)

Pre-operative injections of epoetin-{alpha} versus post-operative retransfusion of autologous shed blood in total hip and knee replacement This prospective randomised clinical trial evaluated the effect of alternatives for allogeneic blood transfusions after total hip replacement and total knee replacement in patients with pre-operative haemoglobin levels between 10.0 g/dl and 13.0 g/dl. A total of 100 patients were randomly allocated to the Eprex (pre-operative injections of epoetin (...) ) or Bellovac groups (post-operative retransfusion of shed blood). Allogeneic blood transfusions were administered according to hospital policy. In the Eprex group, 4% of the patients (two patients) received at least one allogeneic blood transfusion. In the Bellovac group, where a mean 216 ml (0 to 700) shed blood was retransfused, 28% (14 patients) required the allogeneic transfusion (p = 0.002). When comparing Eprex with Bellovac in total hip replacement, the percentages were 7% (two of 30 patients

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2008 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: uncertain