Latest & greatest articles for Hepatotoxic Medication

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Top results for Hepatotoxic Medication

1. Systematic review and meta-analysis of the tolerability and hepatotoxicity of antifungals in empirical and definitive therapy for invasive fungal infection

Systematic review and meta-analysis of the tolerability and hepatotoxicity of antifungals in empirical and definitive therapy for invasive fungal infection Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2010 DARE.

2. Drugs and herbs given to prevent hepatotoxicity of tuberculosis therapy: systematic review of ingredients and evaluation studies

Drugs and herbs given to prevent hepatotoxicity of tuberculosis therapy: systematic review of ingredients and evaluation studies Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2008 DARE.

3. Cohort study of hepatotoxicity associated with nimesulide and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Cohort study of hepatotoxicity associated with nimesulide and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. To estimate the risk of acute hepatotoxicity associated with nimesulide compared with other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.Retrospective cohort and nested case-control study.Umbria region, Italy.400 000 current, recent, and past users (almost 2 million prescriptions) of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs between 1 January 1997 and 31 December 2001.Admissions to hospital for acute (...) non-viral hepatitis and incidence of all hepatopathies and liver injury among users of nimesulide and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.Current use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs was associated with a 1.4 (95% confidence interval 1.0 to 2.1) increased risk of hepatopathy compared with past use. In current users of nimesulide the rate ratio for all hepatopathies and more severe liver injury was 1.3 (0.7 to 2.3) and 1.9 (1.1 to 3.8), respectively.The risk of liver injury

2003 BMJ

4. Systematic review: hepatotoxic events associated with herbal medicinal products

Systematic review: hepatotoxic events associated with herbal medicinal products Systematic review: hepatotoxic events associated with herbal medicinal products Systematic review: hepatotoxic events associated with herbal medicinal products Pittler M H, Ernst E CRD summary This review found some evidence that some herbal medicine products are associated with serious hepatotoxicity (liver damage). The authors stated that the incidence of events is generally unknown, and in most cases it could (...) not be established that the herbal medicine caused the hepatotoxicity. The evidence presented appears to support the authors' conclusions. Authors' objectives To review recent reports of hepatotoxic events associated with the use of herbal medicine products (HMPs). Searching MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, AMED and CISCOM were searched from 1990 until May 2002; the search terms were stated. The authors also handsearched relevant journals (unspecified) and their own files for additional published

2003 DARE.