Latest & greatest articles for Gag Reflex

The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you wanted the latest trusted evidence on Gag Reflex or other clinical topics then use Trip today.

This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on Gag Reflex and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

What is Trip?

Trip is a clinical search engine designed to allow users to quickly and easily find and use high-quality research evidence to support their practice and/or care.

Trip has been online since 1997 and in that time has developed into the internet’s premier source of evidence-based content. Our motto is ‘Find evidence fast’ and this is something we aim to deliver for every single search.

As well as research evidence we also allow clinicians to search across other content types including images, videos, patient information leaflets, educational courses and news.

For further information on Trip click on any of the questions/sections on the left-hand side of this page. But if you still have questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com

Top results for Gag Reflex

1. Nitrous Oxide Is Unlikely to Effectively Suppress the Gag Reflex in Severe Gaggers

Nitrous Oxide Is Unlikely to Effectively Suppress the Gag Reflex in Severe Gaggers UTCAT3199, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Nitrous Oxide Is Unlikely to Effectively Suppress the Gag Reflex in Severe Gaggers Clinical Question In patients with a strong gag reflex, does nitrous oxide prevent gagging more effectively than distraction techniques? Clinical Bottom Line Management of a strong gag reflex (...) on their severity of gagging with examination of the molar region. Management of these patients progressed based on response to treatment from M1 (management without anesthetics), M2 (moderate sedation), to M3 (deep sedation or general anesthesia) with a goal of desensitization in the lowest stage possible. Desensitization was successful in 38 patients. A majority of those who achieved desensitization were in M1 (70.8%), but those with higher-severity gag reflexes achieved low rates of desensitization (only 7.1

2017 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

2. Management of gag reflex for patients undergoing dental treatment. (PubMed)

Management of gag reflex for patients undergoing dental treatment. Gag reflex is an involuntary defence mechanism to protect the pharynx and throat from foreign objects. Gagging is a common problem encountered during dental treatment, which makes therapeutic procedures distressing and often difficult or even impossible to perform. Various interventions can be used to control the gag reflex; for example, anti-nausea medicines, sedatives, local and general anaesthetics, herbal remedies (...) . We did not find any evidence on any other interventions for managing the gag reflex during dental treatment. More well-designed and well-reported trials evaluating different interventions are needed.

2015 Cochrane