Latest & greatest articles for Electronic Prescription

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Top results for Electronic Prescription

1. Effectiveness and safety of electronically delivered prescribing feedback and decision support on antibiotic use for respiratory illness in primary care: REDUCE cluster randomised trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Effectiveness and safety of electronically delivered prescribing feedback and decision support on antibiotic use for respiratory illness in primary care: REDUCE cluster randomised trial. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety at population scale of electronically delivered prescribing feedback and decision support interventions at reducing antibiotic prescribing for self limiting respiratory tract infections.Open label, two arm, cluster randomised controlled trial.UK general practices (...) in the Clinical Practice Research Datalink, randomised between 11 November 2015 and 9 August 2016, with final follow-up on 9 August 2017.79 general practices (582 675 patient years) randomised (1:1) to antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) intervention or usual care.AMS intervention comprised a brief training webinar, automated monthly feedback reports of antibiotic prescribing, and electronic decision support tools to inform appropriate prescribing over 12 months. Intervention components were delivered

2019 BMJ Controlled trial quality: predicted high

2. Evaluation of computerized provider order entry systems: assessing the usability of systems for electronic prescription Full Text available with Trip Pro

Evaluation of computerized provider order entry systems: assessing the usability of systems for electronic prescription The field of medicine has been influenced by the growth and development of information systems such as the Computerized Provider Order Entry (CPOE) System.This study aimed to evaluate the usability of CPOE systems for electronic prescription in Tehran, Iran.This was an evaluation study conducted in 2017. The research population consisted of the CPOE systems used in hospitals (...) of usability (3.42+0.10) compared to those in public hospitals (2.91+0.25).Two main functions of the studied CPOE systems i.e., decision support and prescription support should be developed to make electronic prescription safer and more intuitive. Addressing usability aspects of CPOE systems in practice could improve the usability of these systems for prescription.

2018 Electronic physician

3. Safety of reduced antibiotic prescribing for self limiting respiratory tract infections in primary care: cohort study using electronic health records. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Safety of reduced antibiotic prescribing for self limiting respiratory tract infections in primary care: cohort study using electronic health records.  To determine whether the incidence of pneumonia, peritonsillar abscess, mastoiditis, empyema, meningitis, intracranial abscess, and Lemierre's syndrome is higher in general practices that prescribe fewer antibiotics for self limiting respiratory tract infections (RTIs). Cohort study. 610 UK general practices from the UK Clinical Practice (...) Research Datalink. Registered patients with 45.5 million person years of follow-up from 2005 to 2014. Standardised proportion of RTI consultations with antibiotics prescribed for each general practice, and rate of antibiotic prescriptions for RTIs per 1000 registered patients. Incidence of pneumonia, peritonsillar abscess, mastoiditis, empyema, meningitis, intracranial abscess, and Lemierre's syndrome, adjusting for age group, sex, region, deprivation fifth, RTI consultation rate, and general practice

2016 BMJ

4. Electronic prescribing: risk of potentially harmful errors

physician order entry, CPOE). Some of these errors are similar to those seen with handwritten prescriptions, while others are specific to electronic prescribing and arise through complex mechanisms. Software bugs, computer failure and unreliable or slow internet connections can lead to errors and data loss. The way information is displayed on the screen, often too dense, is also a source of errors. Inputting text outside a field subject to checks – which is often used to bypass a problem – runs the risk (...) Electronic prescribing: risk of potentially harmful errors Prescrire IN ENGLISH - Spotlight ''Electronic prescribing: risk of potentially harmful errors'', 1 July 2016 {1} {1} {1} | | > > > Electronic prescribing: risk of potentially harmful errors Spotlight Every month, the subjects in Prescrire’s Spotlight. 100 most recent :  |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |  Spotlight Electronic prescribing: risk of potentially harmful

2016 Prescrire

5. Using Default Options Within the Electronic Health Record to Increase the Prescribing of Generic-Equivalent Medications: A Quasi-experimental Study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Using Default Options Within the Electronic Health Record to Increase the Prescribing of Generic-Equivalent Medications: A Quasi-experimental Study. Low-value services, such as prescribing brand-name medications that have existing generic equivalents, contribute to unnecessary health care spending.To evaluate the association of an intervention by using the electronic health record with provider prescription of generic-equivalent medications.Quasi-experimental study.General internal medicine (IM (...) ) (n = 2) and family medicine (FM) (n = 2) clinics at the University of Pennsylvania from June 2011 to September 2012.Attending physicians (IM, n = 38; FM, n = 17) and residents (IM, n = 166; FM, n = 34).In January 2012, the default in the electronic health record was changed for IM providers from displaying brand and generic medications to displaying initially only generics, with the ability to opt out.Monthly prescriptions of brand-name and generic-equivalent β-blockers, statins, and proton-pump

2014 Annals of Internal Medicine

6. Adherence to prescribed antihypertensive drug treatments: longitudinal study of electronically compiled dosing histories. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Adherence to prescribed antihypertensive drug treatments: longitudinal study of electronically compiled dosing histories. To describe characteristics of dosing history in patients prescribed a once a day antihypertensive medication.Longitudinal database study.Clinical studies archived in database for 1989-2006.Patients who participated in the studies whose dosing histories were available through electronic monitoring.Persistence with prescribed antihypertensive treatment and execution (...) of their once a day drug dosing regimens.The database contained dosing histories of 4783 patients with hypertension. The data came from 21 phase IV clinical studies, with lengths ranging from 30 to 330 days and involving 43 different antihypertensive drugs, including angiotensin II receptor blockers (n=2088), calcium channel blockers (n=937), angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (n=665), beta blockers (n=195), and diuretics (n=155). About half of the patients who were prescribed an antihypertensive drug

2008 BMJ

7. The effect of electronic prescribing on medication errors and adverse drug events: a systematic review

The effect of electronic prescribing on medication errors and adverse drug events: a systematic review Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2008 DARE.

8. Electronic prescribing: a critical appraisal of the literature

therapy for both the initiation and maintenance of heparin or warfarin treatment in hospital or outpatient settings. Relative effectiveness of different types of electronic advice for different types of prescribers in a variety of settings that: - undertake comparisons of the use of warnings at the time of prescribing versus the provision of alerts after the prescription has been completed - explore the use of critiquing systems that check for alerts after prescriptions have been completed for audit (...) Electronic prescribing: a critical appraisal of the literature Electronic prescribing: a critical appraisal of the literature Electronic prescribing: a critical appraisal of the literature Hider P Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Hider P. Electronic prescribing: a critical appraisal of the literature. Christchurch: New

2002 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.