Latest & greatest articles for Cornea

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Top results for Cornea

1. Ex vivo expanded autologous human corneal epithelial cells containing stem cells (Holoclar) - For the treatment of adult patients with moderate to severe limbal stem cell deficiency (defined by the presence of superficial corneal neovascularisation in at

to chemical and physical burns. Limbal stem cells are important for corneal epithelial regeneration and wound healing. Deficiency can cause the conjunctiva to overgrow the cornea, leading to neovascularisation and development of an unstable corneal epithelium. This may progress to include ingrown fibrous tissue, corneal opacification, conjunctival scarring and ulceration. In addition to corneal neovascularisation, symptoms of LSCD can include pain, inflammation, photophobia and eventually, reduction (...) clinically relevant threshold of 50%. 2 ? The EMA considered that it was important to differentiate between patients with and without stromal scarring. In those with stromal scarring, limbal stem cell transplant has to be combined with subsequent keratoplasty to improve vision. A successful limbal stem cell transplant may facilitate a subsequent cornea transplant and reduce corneal graft rejection. Within the 57 patients who had keratoplasties after Holoclar ? 42% (24/57) had a successful outcome

2020 Scottish Medicines Consortium

2. Corneal collagen cross-linking for bacterial infectious keratitis. (Abstract)

Corneal collagen cross-linking for bacterial infectious keratitis. Infectious keratitis is an infection of the cornea that can be caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa, or parasites. It may be associated with ocular surgery, trauma, contact lens wear, or conditions that cause deficiency or loss of corneal sensation, or suppression of the immune system, such as diabetes, chronic use of topical steroids, or immunomodulatory therapies. Photoactivated chromophore for collagen cross-linking (...) (PACK-CXL) of the cornea is a therapy that has been successful in treating eye conditions such as keratoconus and corneal ectasia. More recently, PACK-CXL has been explored as a treatment option for infectious keratitis.To determine the comparative effectiveness and safety of PACK-CXL with standard therapy versus standard therapy alone for the treatment of bacterial keratitis.We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Trials

2020 Cochrane

3. Artificial corneas versus donor corneas for repeat corneal transplants. (Abstract)

Artificial corneas versus donor corneas for repeat corneal transplants. Individuals who have failed one or more full thickness penetrating keratoplasties may be offered repeat corneal surgery using an artificial or donor cornea. An artificial or prosthetic cornea is known as a keratoprosthesis. Both donor and artificial corneal transplantations involve removal of the diseased and opaque recipient cornea (or the previously failed cornea) and replacement with another donor or prosthetic cornea.To (...) assess the effectiveness of artificial versus donor corneas in individuals who have had one or more failed donor corneal transplantations.We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Trials Register) (2019, Issue 11); Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid Embase; LILACS (Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature database); ClinicalTrials.gov; and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform

2020 Cochrane

4. Fuchs Corneal dystrophy

be asymmetrical) Central cornea affected (may extend to periphery in time) excrescences on posterior surface (guttata) produce ‘beaten metal’ appearance and interrupt specular image of endothelium thickened Descemet’s membrane fine pigment dusting on endothelium cystic epithelial oedema, ground glass appearance (bullous keratopathy) stromal oedema and thickening (endothelial decompensation) posterior stromal scarring Loss of contrast sensitivity Reduced corneal sensitivity The stages of Fuchs Dystrophy have (...) been graded by a number of authorities, but none have gained universal acceptance Differential diagnosis Pseudophakic or aphakic bullous keratopathy Posterior polymorphous dystrophy Cornea guttata (often listed as a dystrophy, but not necessarily progressive) Corneal hydrops (in keratoconus) Contact lens overwear Management by optometrist Practitioners should recognise their limitations and where necessary seek further advice or refer the patient elsewhere Non pharmacological Photography

2020 College of Optometrists

5. Corneal (Foreign Body)

body can be irrigated away with normal saline Foreign body on conjunctiva can be removed with a sterile cotton bud Assess depth of corneal foreign body (slit lamp optical section) Carry out Seidel test to check for corneal perforation Corneal foreign body may require removal with a hypodermic needle or other disposable instrument. To reduce the risk of corneal penetration, ensure that the needle approaches the cornea tangentially After removal, assess size of remaining epithelial defect so (...) Corneal (Foreign Body) Corneal (or other superficial ocular) foreign body submit The College submit You're here: Corneal (or other superficial ocular) foreign body Corneal (or other superficial ocular) foreign body The CMGs are guidelines on the diagnosis and management of a range of common and rare, but important, eye conditions that present with varying frequency in primary and first contact care. Share options Aetiology Patient often gives history of foreign body entering eye wind blown high

2020 College of Optometrists

6. Corneal hydrops

to keratoconus with intracameral injection of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6). Cornea 2007;26:1067- 9 Rowson NJ, Dart JK, Buckley RJ. Corneal neovascularisation in acute hydrops. Eye 1992;6:404-6 Sharma N, Maharana PK, Jhanji V, Vajpayee RB. Management of acute corneal hydrops in ectatic corneal disorders. Curr Opin Ophthalmol. 2012;23(4):317-23 Lay summary This is a rare occurrence seen occasionally in people in whom the cornea (the clear window of the eye) is thinned and distorted, for example in the condition (...) Corneal hydrops Corneal hydrops submit The College submit You're here: Corneal hydrops Corneal hydrops The CMGs are guidelines on the diagnosis and management of a range of common and rare, but important, eye conditions that present with varying frequency in primary and first contact care. Share options Aetiology Rupture of Descemet’s membraneAcute leakage of aqueous into corneal stroma and epithelium Predisposing factors Keratoconus, keratoglobus, pellucid marginal degeneration or other

2020 College of Optometrists

7. Corneal abrasion

by failure of the normal blink reflex, or when its sensitivity to touch is reduced by damage to its nerves, as in diabetes or following shingles of the eye. Corneal abrasion can be very painful as the cornea is one of the most sensitive areas of the body. The clinician will assess the area involved and prescribe treatment accordingly. The damage to the surface can be seen more easily if fluorescein, an orange dye, is instilled into the eye. Anti-inflammatory or antibiotic eye drops are often recommended (...) Corneal abrasion Corneal abrasion submit The College submit You're here: Corneal abrasion Corneal abrasion The CMGs are guidelines on the diagnosis and management of a range of common and rare, but important, eye conditions that present with varying frequency in primary and first contact care. Share options Aetiology Loss of corneal epithelial tissue due to: sub-tarsal foreign body trauma (e.g. fingernail, twig, edge of paper, mascara brush) contact lens related trauma trichiasis (e.g. lash

2020 College of Optometrists

8. Toric intraocular lens versus limbal relaxing incisions for corneal astigmatism after phacoemulsification. (Abstract)

Toric intraocular lens versus limbal relaxing incisions for corneal astigmatism after phacoemulsification. Cataract is the leading cause of blindness in the world, and clinically significant astigmatism may affect up to approximately 20% of people undergoing cataract surgery. Pre-existing astigmatism in people undergoing cataract surgery may be treated, among other techniques, by placing corneal incisions near the limbus (limbal relaxing incisions or LRIs) or by toric intraocular lens (IOLs (...) ) specially designed to reduce or treat the effect of corneal astigmatism on unaided visual acuity.To assess the effects of toric IOLs compared with LRIs in the management of astigmatism during phacoemulsification cataract surgery.We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Trials Register; 2019, Issue 9); Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid Embase and four other databases. The date of the search was 27 September 2019.We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing toric IOLs with LRIs

2019 Cochrane

9. Cenegermin (Oxervate) - for the treatment of moderate (persistent epithelial defect) or severe (corneal ulcer) neurotrophic keratitis in adults

Cenegermin (Oxervate) - for the treatment of moderate (persistent epithelial defect) or severe (corneal ulcer) neurotrophic keratitis in adults Search Page - Drug and Health Product Register Language selection Search and menus Search Search website Search Topics menu You are here: Summary Basis of Decision - - Health Canada Expand all Summary Basis of Decision (SBD) for Contact: Summary Basis of Decision (SBD) documents provide information related to the original authorization of a product

2019 Health Canada - Drug and Health Product Register

10. Are Topical Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Useful for Analgesia in Patients With Traumatic Corneal Abrasions? Full Text available with Trip Pro

Are Topical Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Useful for Analgesia in Patients With Traumatic Corneal Abrasions? Are Topical Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Useful for Analgesia in Patients With Traumatic Corneal Abrasions? - Annals of Emergency Medicine Email/Username: Password: Remember me Search Terms Search within Search Share this page Access provided by Volume 73, Issue 2, Pages 157–159 Are Topical Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Useful for Analgesia in Patients (...) With Traumatic Corneal Abrasions? x Jason R. West , MD (EBEM Commentator) Department of Emergency Medicine, Lincoln Medical and Mental Health Center, Bronx, NY DOI: | Publication History Published online: December 04, 2018 Expand all Collapse all Article Outline Take-Home Message There is no strong evidence to suggest that topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs provide adequate analgesia for patients with traumatic corneal abrasions, yet there is low-quality evidence to suggest that the drugs decreased

2019 Annals of Emergency Medicine Systematic Review Snapshots

11. Intrastromal corneal ring segments for treating keratoconus. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Intrastromal corneal ring segments for treating keratoconus. Keratoconus is a degenerative condition of the cornea that profoundly affects vision and vision-specific quality of life. The axial cornea thins and protrudes, resulting in irregularity and, eventually, scarring of the cornea. There are multiple options available for treating keratoconus. Intrastromal corneal ring segments are small, crescent-shaped plastic rings that are placed in the deep, peripheral corneal stroma in order (...) to flatten the cornea. They are made of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). The procedure does not involve corneal tissue nor does it invade the central optical zone. Intrastromal corneal ring segments are approved for use when contact lenses or spectacles are no longer adequate.To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of intrastromal corneal ring segments as a treatment for keratoconus.We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Trials

2019 Cochrane

12. Combined flanged intrascleral intraocular lens fixation with corneal transplant. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Combined flanged intrascleral intraocular lens fixation with corneal transplant. To report clinical outcomes and surgical technique of flanged intrascleral intraocular lens fixation with double-needle combined with either penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) or ultrathin Descemet-stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty (UT-DSAEK).Five patients underwent combined flanged intrascleral intraocular lens fixation with double-needle technique and keratoplasty. Three patients underwent triple procedure (...) (open sky intrascleral intraocular lens fixation with double-needle and PKP) secondary to ocular trauma or a failed corneal transplant. Two patients underwent combined UT-DSAEK and intrascleral intraocular lens fixation for pseudophakic bullous keratopathy (PBK) and anterior chamber intraocular lens (AC IOL).Flanged intrascleral intraocular lens fixation with double-needle technique combined with PKP or UT-DSAEK was shown to be a safe and effective method of visual rehabilitation without additional

2019 American journal of ophthalmology case reports Controlled trial quality: uncertain

13. Cenegermin (Oxervate) - Treatment of moderate (persistent epithelial defect) or severe (corneal ulcer) neurotrophic keratitis in adults

Cenegermin (Oxervate) - Treatment of moderate (persistent epithelial defect) or severe (corneal ulcer) neurotrophic keratitis in adults Published 08 October 2018 . Statement of advice SMC2124 cenegermin 20micrograms/ml eye drops, solution (Oxervate®) Dompé UK Ltd In confidence 7 September 2018 ADVICE: in the absence of a submission from the holder of the marketing authorisation cenegermin (Oxervate®) is not recommended for use within NHSScotland. Indication under review: Treatment of moderate (...) (persistent epithelial defect) or severe (corneal ulcer) neurotrophic keratitis in adults. The holder of the marketing authorisation has not made a submission to SMC regarding this product in this indication. As a result we cannot recommend its use within NHSScotland. Advice context: No part of this advice may be used without the whole of the advice being quoted in full. This advice represents the view of the Scottish Medicines Consortium and was arrived at after careful consideration and evaluation

2018 Scottish Medicines Consortium

14. Inadvertent corneal pigmentation following cosmetic blepharopigmentation Full Text available with Trip Pro

Inadvertent corneal pigmentation following cosmetic blepharopigmentation To present a case of inadvertent corneal pigmentation as a complication of cosmetic eyelid tattooing.A 63 year old woman presented with left eye redness and irritation 3 days after undergoing permanent eyeliner tattooing of her upper and lower eyelids. On ocular examination a black pigmentation of the nasal cornea in her left eye was observed, with associated conjunctival injection. Initial slit lamp attempts of pigment (...) components such as copper and lead. Due to minimal inflammatory reaction and the non-central location of the corneal pigmentation, the patient remained under close observation, treated with lubrication and no further interventions, until complete resolution by 6 weeks.While the procedure of cosmetic blepharopigmentation is considered relatively safe, it bares many possible complications, ranging from mild dermal irritation to vision-threatening conditions. Our case of inadvertent keratopigmentation

2018 American journal of ophthalmology case reports

15. ORA G3 to measure corneal hysteresis

by a healthcare professional through an in-built operator display. The patient positions their head in a headrest, which is adjusted to allow for measurements of the left or right eye. The device blows a short puff of air to slightly flatten the cornea, which then returns to its original shape. During this the device takes 2 measurements: the force needed to flatten the cornea and the force needed for it to reshape. The difference between the 2 measurements is defined as the level of corneal hysteresis (...) ORA G3 to measure corneal hysteresis ORA G3 to measure corneal h ORA G3 to measure corneal hysteresis ysteresis Medtech innovation briefing Published: 18 June 2018 nice.org.uk/guidance/mib150 pathways Summary Summary The technology technology described in this briefing is Ocular Response Analyzer (ORA) G3. It can be used to measure corneal hysteresis, a possible risk factor for glaucoma. The inno innovativ vative aspects e aspects are that ORA G3 is currently the only device capable

2018 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Advice

16. Delayed-onset Candida parapsilosis cornea tunnel infection and endophthalmitis after cataract surgery: Histopathology and clinical course Full Text available with Trip Pro

Delayed-onset Candida parapsilosis cornea tunnel infection and endophthalmitis after cataract surgery: Histopathology and clinical course To describe a patient with late post-operative endophthalmitis and clear cornea tunnel infection caused by Candida parapsilosis that was masquerading as chronic anterior uveitis.A 62-year old woman with history of uncomplicated cataract surgery 7 months prior and chronic postoperative anterior uveitis, presented with an endothelial plaque, hypopyon (...) , and infiltrates in the capsular bag and within the clear corneal tunnel. Anterior chamber cultures identified C. parapsilosis and pathology of the endothelial plaque showed fungus. Anterior chamber washout, scraping of the endothelial plaque, serial intracameral and intravitreal injections with amphotericin B (10 mcg) failed to control the infection. Pars plana vitrectomy, removal of the intraocular lens and capsular bag, a corneal patch graft, and administration of intravitreal antifungal agents were

2018 American journal of ophthalmology case reports

17. Corneal infiltration and xanthoma formation in mycosis fungoides Full Text available with Trip Pro

Corneal infiltration and xanthoma formation in mycosis fungoides To report a case of corneal infiltration and xanthoma formation in mycosis fungoides (cutaneous T-cell lymphoma).A middle aged Japanese man with mycosis fungoides (MF) involving the face was referred to Ophthalmology for evaluation of unilateral, painless conjunctival injection. Biopsy of the conjunctiva revealed a malignant T cell population consistent with MF tumor invasion. Years later, he returned following several episodes (...) of infectious keratitis with a painless, yellow, rapidly forming mass in the left eye over two weeks. Corneal biopsy showed foamy histiocytes and positive staining for CD68, and a diagnosis of corneal xanthoma was made.Severe ocular surface disease can rarely occur in MF by direct invasion of tumor cells. Corneal infiltration and xanthoma development may be avoidable by careful monitoring for infectious keratitis in patients with conjunctival involvement, as in our case.

2018 American journal of ophthalmology case reports

18. Severe Achromobacter xylosoxidans keratitis with deep corneal involvement Full Text available with Trip Pro

Severe Achromobacter xylosoxidans keratitis with deep corneal involvement To describe a case of Achromobacter xylosoxidans keratitis with deep involvement of the corneal stroma and discuss its management.A 73 year-old monocular male with infectious keratitis of the right eye was referred to the Wilmer Eye Institute after a month of empiric treatment with besifloxacin. On presentation, slit lamp examination of the right eye demonstrated a diffusely edematous cornea with three areas of corneal (...) infiltrates and an overlying epithelial defect and a 1.3 mm hypopyon in the anterior chamber. The corneal culture performed grew A. xylosoxidans. Empiric antibiotic regimen was adjusted once corneal culture susceptibility results were available. Seven days later, slit lamp examination demonstrated a resolving epithelial defect, stable infiltrates, and resolution of the hypopyon. After approximately two months of follow up with his primary ophthalmologist, he was noted to have recurrent hypopyon

2018 American journal of ophthalmology case reports

19. Application of femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery in patients with corneal pathologies Full Text available with Trip Pro

Application of femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery in patients with corneal pathologies 30128369 2018 11 14 2451-9936 11 2018 Sep American journal of ophthalmology case reports Am J Ophthalmol Case Rep Application of femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery in patients with corneal pathologies. 170-171 10.1016/j.ajoc.2018.06.015 Awidi Abdelhalim A Faculty of Medicine, University of Jordan, Queen Rania Al Abdullah Street, Amman, 11942, Jordan. Dzhaber Daliya D Cornea, Cataract (...) , and Anterior Segment Division, The Wilmer Eye Institute, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 600 N Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA. Daoud Yassine J YJ Cornea, Cataract, and Anterior Segment Division, The Wilmer Eye Institute, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 600 N Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA. eng Journal Article 2018 06 19 United States Am J Ophthalmol Case Rep 101679941 2451-9936 2018 03 02 2018 05 01 2018 06 18 2018 8 22 6 0 2018 8 22 6 0 2018 8 22 6 1

2018 American journal of ophthalmology case reports

20. Sequential traumatic corneal open globe rupture in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta type I Full Text available with Trip Pro

at school while wearing protective lenses. One year ago, he required surgical repair of a left open globe following blunt trauma during a middle school basketball game. His exam was significant for a full-thickness corneal laceration, necessitating open globe repair of his right eye, which was remarkably difficult given the poor tissue constitution of the cornea and sclera. He was referred to a genetics specialist, where he was found to have a pathogenic heterozygous splice site variant in the COL1A1 (...) Sequential traumatic corneal open globe rupture in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta type I To report a case of sequential open globe rupture in a young patient with osteogenesis imperfecta type I following minor accidental blunt injury. This represented the patient's sole clinical manifestation of connective tissue disease, leading to a diagnosis of osteogenesis imperfecta type I at the age of 12 years old.A 12-year-old male presented with right eye pain following accidental blunt trauma

2018 American journal of ophthalmology case reports