Latest & greatest articles for Contusion

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Top results for Contusion

1. Physical Therapy Evaluation and Treatment After Concussion/Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

Physical Therapy Evaluation and Treatment After Concussion/Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Clinical Practice Guidelines CATHERINE C. QUATMAN-YATES, PT , DPT , PhD • AIRELLE HUNTER-GIORDANO, PT , DPT KATHY K. SHIMAMURA, PT , DPT , NCS, OCS, CSCS, FAAOMPT • ROB LANDEL, PT , DPT , FAPTA BARA A. ALSALAHEEN, PT , PhD • TIMOTHY A. HANKE, PT , PhD • KAREN L. McCULLOCH, PT , PhD, FAPTA Physical Therapy Evaluation and Treatment After Concussion/ Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Clinical Practice Guidelines (...) & sports physical therapy Concussion: Clinical Practice Guidelines Concussion: Clinical Practice Guidelines Summary of Recommendations* SCREENING AND DIAGNOSIS Diagnosis A Physical therapists must screen all individuals who have experienced a potential concussive event and document the presence or absence of symptoms, impairments, and func- tional limitations that may relate to a concussive event. Screening for Indicators of Emergency Conditions A Physical therapists must screen patients who have

2020 The Orthopaedic Section of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA), Inc.

2. Early Subthreshold Aerobic Exercise for Sport-Related Concussion: A Randomized Clinical Trial (Abstract)

Early Subthreshold Aerobic Exercise for Sport-Related Concussion: A Randomized Clinical Trial Sport-related concussion (SRC) is a significant public health problem without an effective treatment.To assess the effectiveness of subsymptom threshold aerobic exercise vs a placebo-like stretching program prescribed to adolescents in the acute phase of recovery from SRC.This multicenter prospective randomized clinical trial was conducted at university concussion centers. Male and female adolescent (...) ; 24 female [47%]). Participants in the aerobic exercise group were seen a mean (SD) of 4.9 (2.2) days after the SRC, and those in the stretching group were seen a mean (SD) of 4.8 (2.4) days after the SRC. There were no differences in age, sex, previous concussions, time from injury, initial symptom severity score, or initial exercise treadmill test and physical examination results. Aerobic exercise participants recovered in a median of 13 (interquartile range [IQR], 10-18.5) days, whereas

2019 EvidenceUpdates

3. Continued vs. interrupted direct oral anticoagulants at the time of device surgery, in patients with moderate to high risk of arterial thrombo-embolic events (BRUISE CONTROL-2) (Abstract)

Continued vs. interrupted direct oral anticoagulants at the time of device surgery, in patients with moderate to high risk of arterial thrombo-embolic events (BRUISE CONTROL-2) Guidelines recommend warfarin continuation rather than heparin bridging for pacemaker and defibrillator surgery, after the BRUISE CONTROL trial demonstrated an 80% reduction in device pocket haematoma with this approach. However, direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are now used to treat the majority of patients

2019 EvidenceUpdates

4. Guidelines for diagnosing and managing pediatric concussion

Guidelines for diagnosing and managing pediatric concussion Guidelines for Diagnosing and Managing Pediatric Concussion First edition, June 2014, v1.1 Recommendations for Health Care Professionals This document is intended to guide health care professionals in diagnosing and managing pediatric—not adult—concussion. It is not for self-diagnosis or treatment. Parents and/or caregivers may bring it to the attention of their child/adolescent’s health care professionals. The best knowledge available (...) or damage arising from any claims made by a third party. Also, as the sponsor of this document, the Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation assumes no responsibility or liability whatsoever for changes made to the guidelines without its consent. Any changes must be accompanied by the statement: “Adapted from Guidelines for Diagnosing and Managing Pediatric Concussion with/without permission,” according to whether or not permission was sought and/or given. About the Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation The Ontario

2019 CPG Infobase

5. Living Guideline for Diagnosing and Managing Pediatric Concussion

Living Guideline for Diagnosing and Managing Pediatric Concussion LIVING GUIDELINE FOR DIAGNOSING AND MANAGING PEDIATRIC CONCUSSION Reed, N.*, Zemek, R.*, Dawson, J., Ledoux, AA., et al. (2019). Living Guideline for Diagnosing and Managing Pediatric Concussion. Toronto, ON: Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation * These authors contributed equally. 1 Guideline for Diagnosing and Managing Pediatric Concussion – Recommendations / Tools TABLE OF CONTENTS Disclaimer…………………………………………………………………………. 2 Guideline (...) Overview……………………………………………………… 3 List of Recommendations……………………………………………….. 4 Recommendations……………………………………………….………….. 12 List of Tools……….…………………………………….……………………….. 55 References……………………………………………………………………….. 56 2 Guideline for Diagnosing and Managing Pediatric Concussion – Recommendations / Tools DISCLAIMER: The recommendations and resources found within the Living Guideline for Diagnosing and Managing Pediatric Concussion are intended to inform and instruct care providers and other stakeholders who

2019 Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation

6. Assessment of easy bruising

Assessment of easy bruising Assessment of easy bruising - Differential diagnosis of symptoms | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Assessment of easy bruising Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: September 2018 Summary A bruise (ecchymosis) is caused by bleeding beneath the skin as a result of extravasation of blood from surrounding blood vessels. It may develop due to abnormalities in haemostasis or alteration in the structural (...) integrity of the blood vessel wall and surrounding subcutaneous tissue. Easy bruising implies that no significant trauma has occurred to the skin or soft tissue to cause the bruise, and the bruises are larger and/or more frequent than what would normally be seen. It is a common complaint of patients seen in a medical practice. Surveys of normal healthy individuals report the frequency of easy bruising to range from 12% to 55%. Srámek A, Eikenboom JC, Briët E, et al. Usefulness of patient interview

2018 BMJ Best Practice

7. Using opinion leaders to address intervention gaps in concussion prevention in youth sports: key concepts and foundational theory Full Text available with Trip Pro

Using opinion leaders to address intervention gaps in concussion prevention in youth sports: key concepts and foundational theory Behavioral interventions to increase disclosure and proper management of concussion in youth sports have unrealized potential when it comes to preventing concussion. Interventions have focused on changing individual athlete behavior and have fallen short of the potential for sustained systemic behavioral change. One potentially critical reason for this shortfall (...) is that other key determinants of risk behaviors at all levels of the socio-ecological model (e.g. interpersonal, community, policy) are not addressed in extant programming. There is a critical need for theory-driven interventions that address concussion prevention and education at the community level and target sustainable culture change. The Popular Opinion Leader (POL) intervention, a multi-level intervention model previously successfully employed in multiple public health contexts, is theoretically well

2018 Injury epidemiology

8. Concussion. (Abstract)

Concussion. Concussions are a common injury for which patients often present first to primary care physicians. They can affect the day-to-day function of patients in school and work, as well as in sports and recreational activities. Recognizing common physical signs and symptoms after injury facilitates timely diagnosis and treatment, permitting initiation of an active management approach to recovery while preventing secondary injury. For persons with persistent symptoms, active rehabilitation

2018 Annals of Internal Medicine

9. Concussion knowledge, attitudes and reporting intention among adult competitive Muay Thai kickboxing athletes: a cross-sectional study Full Text available with Trip Pro

Concussion knowledge, attitudes and reporting intention among adult competitive Muay Thai kickboxing athletes: a cross-sectional study Muay Thai kickboxing is a full-contact combat sport with a high incidence of head trauma, yet little is known about these athletes' concussion knowledge and attitudes. This study aims to describe and quantify concussion knowledge, attitudes, and reporting intention among adult competitive Muay Thai kickboxing athletes.This cross-sectional study comprised 193 (...) competitive Muay Thai kickboxing athletes aged ≥18 years registered with the Thai Boxing Association Sanctioning Authority. The mean concussion knowledge score was 19.5 (SD 2.3) out of 25, the mean concussion attitudes score was 62.7 (SD 7.4) out of 75, and 134 (69.4%) of respondents indicated that they were likely to report concussion symptoms. No significant predictors of concussion knowledge, attitudes, or reporting intention were revealed.Competitive Muay Thai kickboxing athletes appear to have

2018 Injury epidemiology

10. Common data elements collected among universities for sport-related concussion studies Full Text available with Trip Pro

Common data elements collected among universities for sport-related concussion studies Universities are increasingly implementing programs to effectively respond to and manage sport-related concussions (SRCs). One such effort is to develop common data elements (CDEs) and standardize data collection methods. The objectives of this study were to describe CDEs currently collected by Big Ten and Ivy League universities for SRC studies, and to compare the data collected with the core CDEs (...) recommended by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS).We conducted an anonymous cross-sectional online survey among medical staff at the 14 Big Ten and 8 Ivy League universities (one per university) between September and October 2015. The survey instrument, including 9 questions corresponding to the concussion data collected before, during, and after a concussion, was developed and pilot-tested before field use. We analyzed patterns of the concussion CDEs being collected

2018 Injury epidemiology

11. Guideline for concussion/mild traumatic brain injury & persistent symptoms - Initial Management of Concussion/mTBI

Guideline for concussion/mild traumatic brain injury & persistent symptoms - Initial Management of Concussion/mTBI Initial Management of Concussion/mTBI // Brain Injury Guidelines Toggle navigation NAVIGATION > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > Guideline For Concussion/Mild Traumatic Brain Injury & Persistent Symptoms 3rd Edition, for Adults over 18 years of age Initial Management of Concussion/mTBI Whether a patient first presents to the Emergency Department (ED) or to the primary care (...) to specialists should also be considered if symptoms exhibit an atypical pattern or cannot be linked to a concussion event, and/ or when there are other major comorbid conditions present (e.g., depression, PTSD). The majority of patients will be discharged home; it should be noted that a person who remains symptomatic post mTBI should not drive for at least 24 hours. 3-6 Even asymptomatic patients after 48 hours exhibited poorer vehicle control, especially when navigating curves suggesting that driving

2018 Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation

12. Guideline for concussion/mild traumatic brain injury & persistent symptoms - Sport-Related Concussion/mTBI

Guideline for concussion/mild traumatic brain injury & persistent symptoms - Sport-Related Concussion/mTBI Sport-Related Concussion/mTBI // Brain Injury Guidelines Toggle navigation NAVIGATION > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > Guideline For Concussion/Mild Traumatic Brain Injury & Persistent Symptoms 3rd Edition, for Adults over 18 years of age Sport-Related Concussion/mTBI In the sports literature, the effects of traumatic biomechanical forces on the brain have traditionally been referred (...) to as a concussion. In this Guideline, the term concussion/mTBI will be used to maintain consistency within this document. A sport-related concussion/mTBI is a traumatic brain injury that may be caused by either a direct blow to the head, face, neck or elsewhere on the body as an indirect force being transmitted to the head during sports activity. A sport-related concussion/mTBI can result in a range of clinical signs and symptoms that may or may not involve a loss of consciousness. While the injury may result

2018 Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation

13. Guideline for concussion/mild traumatic brain injury & persistent symptoms - Cognitive Difficulties

Guideline for concussion/mild traumatic brain injury & persistent symptoms - Cognitive Difficulties Cognitive Difficulties // Brain Injury Guidelines Toggle navigation NAVIGATION > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > Guideline For Concussion/Mild Traumatic Brain Injury & Persistent Symptoms 3rd Edition, for Adults over 18 years of age Cognitive Difficulties The presence and persistence of cognitive symptoms following concussion/mTBI can affect an individual’s ability to function in everyday life (...) , including work, academic and social activities. 1,2 Mild TBI/concussion is associated with disruptions in cognitive skills that include difficulties with attention/concentration, processing speed, learning/memory and executive function. 3-6 In the acute phase of injury there are changes in cerebral metabolic activity and perfusion, particularly in the frontal lobes associated with cognitive changes. 7-12 Generally, the expected recovery from cognitive-based symptoms following concussion/mTBI ranges from

2018 Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation

14. Guideline for concussion/mild traumatic brain injury & persistent symptoms - Vestibular (Balance/ Dizziness) & Vision Dysfunction

Guideline for concussion/mild traumatic brain injury & persistent symptoms - Vestibular (Balance/ Dizziness) & Vision Dysfunction Vestibular (Balance/ Dizziness) & Vision Dysfunction // Brain Injury Guidelines Toggle navigation NAVIGATION > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > Guideline For Concussion/Mild Traumatic Brain Injury & Persistent Symptoms 3rd Edition, for Adults over 18 years of age Vestibular (Balance/ Dizziness) & Vision Dysfunction Vestibular (Balance/Dizziness) Dysfunction (...) Persistent vertigo, dizziness, imbalance and visual disturbance are common symptoms of patients with concussion/mTBI and are often associated with objective impairments of the vestibular system. 1,2 Vestibular impairments can occur peripherally in the inner ear, or centrally in nuclei that integrate vestibular signals in order to maintain balance and posture. The vestibular system also affects eye movement through a variety of mechanisms including the vestibulo-occular reflex (VOR). The most common cause

2018 Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation

15. Guideline for concussion/mild traumatic brain injury & persistent symptoms - Fatigue

Guideline for concussion/mild traumatic brain injury & persistent symptoms - Fatigue Fatigue // Brain Injury Guidelines Toggle navigation NAVIGATION > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > Guideline For Concussion/Mild Traumatic Brain Injury & Persistent Symptoms 3rd Edition, for Adults over 18 years of age Fatigue Fatigue has been conceptualized as an experience of weariness or tiredness following mental or physical exertion, often resulting in a reduced capacity for work and limited efficiency (...) to respond to stimuli. Fatigue can be caused by psychological or physiological forces 1 and can be central or peripheral, which in lay terms is experienced as cognitive fatigue and physical fatigue or weariness. 2-4 Fatigue is one of the most pervasive symptoms following concussion/mTBI, with 27.8% of individuals experiencing persistent fatigue at 3 months post-injury. 5 The perception of fatigue can be out of proportion to exertion or may even occur without any exertion. 6 One study reported a level

2018 Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation

16. Guideline for concussion/mild traumatic brain injury & persistent symptoms - Post-Traumatic Headache

Guideline for concussion/mild traumatic brain injury & persistent symptoms - Post-Traumatic Headache Post-Traumatic Headache // Brain Injury Guidelines Toggle navigation NAVIGATION > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > Guideline For Concussion/Mild Traumatic Brain Injury & Persistent Symptoms 3rd Edition, for Adults over 18 years of age Post-Traumatic Headache Headache is the most common and among the most prevalent persistent symptoms following mTBI. 1-4 Studies to date have documented (...) that anywhere from 30-90% of individuals who sustain a mTBI develop post-traumatic headache. 2,5 Interestingly, several researchers have reported that post-traumatic headache is more common after concussion/mTBI than after severe TBI. 5-17 Notably, post-traumatic headache is associated with a high degree of disability 1 and is more chronic and persistent than previously thought. 18 The vast majority of people with post-traumatic headache improve within days or weeks; however, for some individuals, headaches

2018 Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation

17. Guideline for concussion/mild traumatic brain injury & persistent symptoms - Sleep-Wake Disturbances

Guideline for concussion/mild traumatic brain injury & persistent symptoms - Sleep-Wake Disturbances Sleep-Wake Disturbances // Brain Injury Guidelines Toggle navigation NAVIGATION > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > Guideline For Concussion/Mild Traumatic Brain Injury & Persistent Symptoms 3rd Edition, for Adults over 18 years of age Sleep-Wake Disturbances More than 50% of patients report sleep disturbances following mTBI, specifically insomnia, hypersomnia, obstructive sleep apnea, poor (...) and reassured about the fact that sleep alterations are very common in the acute stages of concussion/mTBI. 7.2 C Patients who have identified sleep alterations should be monitored for sleep/wake disturbances. Patients who have persisting sleep disturbances should be monitored for sleep-wake disorders (e.g., insomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness). (see Appendices and ). 7.3 C Screen for pre-existing sleep disturbances/ disorders, medical conditions, current medication use, comorbid psychopathology and risk

2018 Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation

18. Guideline for concussion/mild traumatic brain injury & persistent symptoms - Mental Health Disorders

Guideline for concussion/mild traumatic brain injury & persistent symptoms - Mental Health Disorders Mental Health Disorders // Brain Injury Guidelines Toggle navigation NAVIGATION > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > Guideline For Concussion/Mild Traumatic Brain Injury & Persistent Symptoms 3rd Edition, for Adults over 18 years of age Mental Health Disorders General considerations Mental health disorders are common following mTBI, and appear to be major determinants of post-mTBI wellness (...) and functional recovery. This includes disorders of mood which consist of symptoms related to depression and anxiety. The etiology of mTBI/concussive mood disorders may be related to reactive or environmental factors such as the experience of the trauma resulting in the injury (e.g., manifesting in post-traumatic stress symptoms, phobias and related anxieties) or to the negative outcomes following the injury (i.e., depression related to not participating in important roles such as work or school, sports, etc

2018 Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation

19. Guideline for concussion/mild traumatic brain injury & persistent symptoms - General Recommendations Regarding Management of Persistent Symptoms

Guideline for concussion/mild traumatic brain injury & persistent symptoms - General Recommendations Regarding Management of Persistent Symptoms General Recommendations Regarding Management of Persistent Symptoms // Brain Injury Guidelines Toggle navigation NAVIGATION > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > Guideline For Concussion/Mild Traumatic Brain Injury & Persistent Symptoms 3rd Edition, for Adults over 18 years of age General Recommendations Regarding Management of Persistent Symptoms (...) Consistent with general expectations of both patients and healthcare professionals, symptoms following mTBI are anticipated to resolve in a timely fashion in the majority of cases; evidence is emerging that some people (15% or greater) continue to have persistent symptoms. 1-3 There is wide variation in how people recover after concussion/mTBI 4 even when experiencing similar injuries. 2 This guideline has been developed to assist in managing those individuals who continue to have persistent symptoms

2018 Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation

20. Guideline for concussion/mild traumatic brain injury & persistent symptoms - Return-to-Activity / Work / School Considerations

Guideline for concussion/mild traumatic brain injury & persistent symptoms - Return-to-Activity / Work / School Considerations Return-to-Activity / Work / School Considerations // Brain Injury Guidelines Toggle navigation NAVIGATION > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > Guideline For Concussion/Mild Traumatic Brain Injury & Persistent Symptoms 3rd Edition, for Adults over 18 years of age Return-to-Activity / Work / School Considerations Returning to usual activities after a concussion/mTBI can (...) -aged children physical activity within 7 days of acute injury compared with no physical activity was associated with reduced risk of persistent post-concussive symptoms. 3 For workers, the literature demonstrates brain injury patients who are employed report better health status, improved sense of well-being, greater social integration within the community, less usage of health services and a better quality of life than do those who are not employed. 4 In order to facilitate early and safe

2018 Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation