Latest & greatest articles for Cerebral Spinal Fluid

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Top results for Cerebral Spinal Fluid

1. Continuous cerebral spinal fluid drainage associated with complications in patients admitted with subarachnoid hemorrhage Full Text available with Trip Pro

Continuous cerebral spinal fluid drainage associated with complications in patients admitted with subarachnoid hemorrhage Cerebral artery vasospasm is a major cause of death and disability in patients recovering from subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Although the exact cause of vasospasm is unknown, one body of research suggests that clearing blood products by CSF drainage is associated with a lower frequency and severity of vasospasm. There are multiple approaches to facilitating CSF drainage (...) , but there is inadequate evidence to determine the best practice. The purpose of this study was to explore whether continuous or intermittent CSF drainage was superior for reducing vasospasm.The authors performed a randomized clinical trial. Within 72 hours of admission for SAH, patients with an external ventricular drain (EVD) were randomized to undergo continuous CSF drainage with intermittent intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring (open-EVD group) or continuous ICP monitoring with intermittent CSF drainage (monitor

2013 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: uncertain

2. Spontaneous spinal cerebrospinal fluid leaks and intracranial hypotension. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Spontaneous spinal cerebrospinal fluid leaks and intracranial hypotension. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is caused by spontaneous spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks and is known for causing orthostatic headaches. It is an important cause of new headaches in young and middle-aged individuals, but initial misdiagnosis is common.To summarize existing evidence regarding the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of spontaneous spinal CSF leaks and intracranial (...) with an underlying connective tissue disorder to cause the CSF leaks. An orthostatic headache is the prototypical manifestation but other headache patterns occur as well, and associated symptoms are common. Typical magnetic resonance imaging findings include subdural fluid collections, enhancement of the pachymeninges, engorgement of venous structures, pituitary hyperemia, and sagging of the brain (mnemonic: SEEPS). Myelography is the study of choice to identify the spinal CSF leak. Treatments include bed rest

2006 JAMA