Latest & greatest articles for Cancer Survivor Care

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This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on Cancer Survivor Care and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

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Top results for Cancer Survivor Care

1. Perspectives on Conversations About Costs of Cancer Care of Breast Cancer Survivors and Cancer Center Staff: A Qualitative Study. (PubMed)

Perspectives on Conversations About Costs of Cancer Care of Breast Cancer Survivors and Cancer Center Staff: A Qualitative Study. Despite recommendations to discuss the cost of care (CoC) with patients with cancer, little formal guidance is available on how to conduct these sensitive conversations in ways that are acceptable to both patients and providers.To explore the perspectives of patients and medical and nonmedical cancer center staff on CoC conversations.In individual interviews (...) be compassionate, helpful, and knowledgeable of the patient's specific situation (for example, treatment plan, insurance coverage) and of the resources available to attain the patient's goals of care.Interviews were limited to older breast cancer survivors and staff at 1 institution.Conversations about CoC extend beyond discussing costs and must be sensitive to the vulnerability experienced by patients. These findings can guide training of personnel involved in CoC conversations.Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

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2019 Annals of Internal Medicine

2. Follow-Up Model of Care for Cancer Survivors: Recommendations for the Delivery of Follow-up Care for Cancer Survivors in Ontario

Follow-Up Model of Care for Cancer Survivors: Recommendations for the Delivery of Follow-up Care for Cancer Survivors in Ontario Follow-Up Model of Care for Cancer Survivors Recommendations for the Delivery of Follow-up Care for Cancer Survivors in Ontario March 2019 Acknowledgements Cancer Care Ontario would like to acknowledge the contribution and expertise of the following groups, committees, and organizations in the development of this document. Survivorship Care Improvement Project Models (...) Sussman, Chair, Survivorship Care Improvement Project Models of Care Working Group Hasmik Beglaryan, Manager, Models of Care, Cancer Care Ontario Ada Payne, Lead, Models of Care, Cancer Care Ontario Follow-Up Model of Care for Cancer Survivors 3 Content OVERVIEW 4 Background 4 Purpose of This Document 5 Approach 5 Scope 5 Definitions 5 Guiding Principles for Follow-Up Model of Care 6 RECOMMENDATIONS 6 Follow-Up Care Planning 6 Surveillance 8 Management of Consequences of Cancer 9 Prevention and Health

2019 Cancer Care Ontario

3. Transition from pediatric to adult follow-up care in childhood cancer survivors - a systematic review

Transition from pediatric to adult follow-up care in childhood cancer survivors - a systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files

2019 PROSPERO

4. A realist review of self-management support interventions delivered in primary care to support cancer survivors to manage the long-term physical and psychosocial consequences of systemic anticancer therapies

A realist review of self-management support interventions delivered in primary care to support cancer survivors to manage the long-term physical and psychosocial consequences of systemic anticancer therapies Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears

2019 PROSPERO

5. Do Perceived Needs Affect Willingness to Use Traditional Chinese Medicine for Survivorship Care Among Chinese Cancer Survivors? A Cross-Sectional Survey (PubMed)

Do Perceived Needs Affect Willingness to Use Traditional Chinese Medicine for Survivorship Care Among Chinese Cancer Survivors? A Cross-Sectional Survey Purpose We aimed to quantify Chinese cancer survivors' perceived needs for survivorship care and to evaluate whether these needs could impact their willingness to use traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey with members of the Beijing Anti-Cancer Association in China. We measured perceived needs (...) with the seven-item Brief Chinese Cancer Survivorship Needs Scale that assesses psychological, functional, nutritional, social, body image, pain, and symptom needs. The outcome variable was willingness to use TCM for survivorship care. We performed multivariable logistic regression analyses to evaluate whether perceived needs are associated with willingness. Results A total of 600 patients were invited, with a response rate of 81%. The mean (standard deviation) score of the perceived needs scale (0 to 10

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2017 Journal of global oncology

6. Survivors of cancer seeking care continuity and lengthier appointments

Survivors of cancer seeking care continuity and lengthier appointments HEAL TH EC ONOMICS RESEARCH UNIT Promoting Excellence in Health Economics HERU is supported by the Chief Scientist Office (CSO) of the Scottish Government Health & Social Care Directorates (SGHSC) Survivors of cancer seeking care continuity and lengthier appointments policy brief March 2017 Key Findings • Cancer survivors may accept non-consultant follow-up as long as they receive other benefits. • Care continuity (...) was sufficient compensation in most types of cancer, along with longer appointments, one-to-one counselling and dietary advice. • Given practicalities, costs, and the potential to develop continuous care, specialist nurse-led cancer follow-up may be attractive. • Preferences differed between survivors of different cancers. What problem was this research addressing? After completing their primary treatment, most patients with cancer enter structured cancer follow-up aimed at detecting cancer recurrence

2017 Health Economics Research Unit

7. Perceptions and Barriers of Survivorship Care in Asia: Perceptions From Asian Breast Cancer Survivors (PubMed)

Perceptions and Barriers of Survivorship Care in Asia: Perceptions From Asian Breast Cancer Survivors With the long-term goal to optimize post-treatment cancer care in Asia, we conducted a qualitative study to gather in-depth descriptions from multiethnic Asian breast cancer survivors on their perceptions and experiences of cancer survivorship and their perceived barriers to post-treatment follow-up.Twenty-four breast cancer survivors in Singapore participated in six structured focus group (...) as coping strategies. Survivors indicated lack of consultation time and fear of unplanned hospitalization as main barriers to optimal survivorship care. Furthermore, survivors indicated that they preferred receipt of survivorship care at the specialty cancer center.Budding survivorship programs in Asia must take survivor perspectives into consideration to ensure that survivorship care is fully optimized within the community.

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2016 Journal of global oncology

8. General Internists' Preferences and Knowledge About the Care of Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancer: A Cross-sectional Survey. (PubMed)

General Internists' Preferences and Knowledge About the Care of Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancer: A Cross-sectional Survey. Adult childhood cancer survivors (CCSs) are at high risk for illness and premature death. Little is known about the physicians who provide their routine medical care.To determine general internists' self-reported attitudes and knowledge about the care of CCSs.Cross-sectional survey.Mailed survey delivered between September 2011 and August 2012.Random sample of 2000 U.S (...) % of these internists never received a treatment summary. On average, internists were "somewhat uncomfortable" caring for survivors of Hodgkin lymphoma, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and osteosarcoma. Internists reported being "somewhat unfamiliar" with available surveillance guidelines. In response to a clinical vignette about a young adult survivor of Hodgkin lymphoma, 90.6% of respondents did not appropriately recommend yearly breast cancer surveillance, 85.1% did not appropriately recommended cardiac

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2014 Annals of Internal Medicine

9. Follow-Up Care, Surveillance Protocol, and Secondary Prevention Measures for Survivors of Colorectal Cancer Endorsement

Follow-Up Care, Surveillance Protocol, and Secondary Prevention Measures for Survivors of Colorectal Cancer Endorsement Follow-Up Care, Surveillance Protocol, and Secondary Prevention Measures for Survivors of Colorectal Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Endorsement | Journal of Clinical Oncology Search in: Menu Article Tools ASCO SPECIAL ARTICLES Article Tools OPTIONS & TOOLS COMPANION ARTICLES No companion articles ARTICLE CITATION DOI: 10.1200/JCO (...) .2013.50.7442 Journal of Clinical Oncology - published online before print November 12, 2013 PMID: Follow-Up Care, Surveillance Protocol, and Secondary Prevention Measures for Survivors of Colorectal Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Endorsement x Jeffrey A. Meyerhardt , x Pamela B. Mangu , x Patrick J. Flynn , x Larissa Korde , x Charles L. Loprinzi , x Bruce D. Minsky , x Nicholas J. Petrelli , x Kim Ryan , x Deborah H. Schrag , x Sandra L. Wong , x Al B. Benson III

2013 American Society of Clinical Oncology Guidelines

10. American Society of Clinical Oncology clinical evidence review on the ongoing care of adult cancer survivors: cardiac and pulmonary late effects. (PubMed)

American Society of Clinical Oncology clinical evidence review on the ongoing care of adult cancer survivors: cardiac and pulmonary late effects. PURPOSE: To review the evidence on the incidence of long-term cardiac or pulmonary toxicity secondary to chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or trastuzumab in symptomatic and asymptomatic cancer survivors. METHODS: An American Society of Clinical Oncology Panel reviewed pertinent information from the literature through February 2006. RESULTS: Few studies (...) directly addressing the benefits of screening for long-term cardiac or pulmonary toxicity in asymptomatic cancer survivors who received chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or trastuzumab were identified. The reviewed literature included primarily retrospective and cross-sectional studies describing the incidence of cardiac and pulmonary late effects. Anatomic and/or functional abnormalities have been associated with use of all currently available anthracyclines and their derivatives. Trastuzumab-related

2007 EvidenceUpdates

11. Long-term medical care of testicular cancer survivors. (PubMed)

Long-term medical care of testicular cancer survivors. Testicular cancer is the most common solid tumor diagnosed in men 20 to 35 years of age. Because of highly effective treatments that may include surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy, most patients become long-term survivors. Health-related issues that confront testicular cancer survivors include the late medical effects of chemotherapy, the late relapse of disease, the development of second cancers, the effect of the disease (...) and treatment on fertility, and the psychosocial consequences. This case-based discussion focuses on the primary care physician's evaluation and management of a long-term survivor of testicular cancer who was previously treated with surgery and chemotherapy.

2002 Annals of Internal Medicine