Latest & greatest articles for Aphasia

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Top results for Aphasia

1. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) for improving aphasia in adults with aphasia after stroke. (PubMed)

Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) for improving aphasia in adults with aphasia after stroke. Stroke is one of the leading causes of disability worldwide and aphasia among survivors is common. Current speech and language therapy (SLT) strategies have only limited effectiveness in improving aphasia. A possible adjunct to SLT for improving SLT outcomes might be non-invasive brain stimulation by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to modulate cortical excitability and hence (...) to improve aphasia.To assess the effects of tDCS for improving aphasia in people who have had a stroke.We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (June 2018), CENTRAL (Cochrane Library, June 2018), MEDLINE (1948 to June 2018), Embase (1980 to June 2018), CINAHL (1982 to June 2018), AMED (1985 to June 2018), Science Citation Index (1899 to June 2018), and seven additional databases. We also searched trial registers and reference lists, handsearched conference proceedings and contacted authors

2019 Cochrane

2. Effectiveness of rehabilitation training (RT) combined with acupuncture on aphasia after cerebral hemorrhage (CH): a systematic review protocol of randomized controlled trial

Effectiveness of rehabilitation training (RT) combined with acupuncture on aphasia after cerebral hemorrhage (CH): a systematic review protocol of randomized controlled trial Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability

2019 PROSPERO

3. Psychosocial wellbeing and quality of life in people with mild aphasia after stroke: a systematic review of speech language therapy and behavioural rehabilitation interventions

Psychosocial wellbeing and quality of life in people with mild aphasia after stroke: a systematic review of speech language therapy and behavioural rehabilitation interventions Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability

2019 PROSPERO

4. Network meta-analysis on randomized trials focusing on the effects of transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) for improving aphasia after stroke

Network meta-analysis on randomized trials focusing on the effects of transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) for improving aphasia after stroke Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content

2019 PROSPERO

5. Attention control comparisons with SLT for people with aphasia following stroke: methodological concerns raised following a systematic review

Attention control comparisons with SLT for people with aphasia following stroke: methodological concerns raised following a systematic review Attention control comparisons in trials of stroke rehabilitation require care to minimize the risk of comparison choice bias. We compared the similarities and differences in SLT and social support control interventions for people with aphasia.Trial data from the 2016 Cochrane systematic review of SLT for aphasia after stroke Methods: Direct and indirect (...) difference in therapy interventions. Social support is an important adjunct to formal language rehabilitation. Therapists should continue to enable those close to the person with aphasia to provide tailored communication support, functional language stimulation and opportunities to apply rehabilitation gains. Systematic group differences in completion rates is a design-related risk of bias in outcomes observed.

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2018 EvidenceUpdates

6. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Does Not Improve Language Outcome in Subacute Poststroke Aphasia

Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Does Not Improve Language Outcome in Subacute Poststroke Aphasia The aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of transcranial direct current stimulation on word-finding treatment outcome in subacute poststroke aphasia.In this multi-center, double-blind, randomized controlled trial with 6-month follow-up, we included 58 patients with subacute aphasia (<3 months poststroke), who were enrolled in a stroke rehabilitation program. Patients

2018 EvidenceUpdates

7. Effects of multimodal communication program on patients with chronic aphasia: a single-subject A-B-A design study (PubMed)

Effects of multimodal communication program on patients with chronic aphasia: a single-subject A-B-A design study Aphasia as a common consequence of stroke, is an acquired neurologic communication disorder that can affect symbol language processing. Different types of intervention approaches have been introduced. Multimodal Communication Program (MCP) is a new augmentative alternative communication approach in chronic aphasia. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of MCP (...) on communication skills of patients with chronic aphasia.This prospective, single subject, A-B-A design study was done during 2016 in Semnan, Iran. Participants were two patients with severe aphasia with a single left-hemisphere stroke. Three phases, including baseline, intervention and follow-up were administered. The patients received nine-hour intervention, over 10 working days.Three different scores were calculated for each patient: verbal efforts, the frequency of each modality and the accuracy

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2018 Electronic physician

8. ‘I felt pain. Deep pain…’: Experiences of primary caregivers of stroke survivors with aphasia in a South African township (PubMed)

‘I felt pain. Deep pain…’: Experiences of primary caregivers of stroke survivors with aphasia in a South African township Aphasia is an acquired impairment in language and in the cognitive processes that underlie language. Aphasia affects the quality of life of the person with aphasia (PWA) and his or her families in various ways in diverse contexts and cultures. It is therefore important that speech language therapists understand how different contextual and cultural factors may mediate (...) were analysed according to the principles of thematic analysis.Findings indicated that caregivers are unfamiliar with aphasia and the support available to them. Participants experienced frustration and found communication to be challenging owing to their lack of communication strategies. The participants' experiences reflected their context-specific experiences, such as feminisation of caregiving, barriers to healthcare, the influence of low health literacy and contextual perspectives on stroke

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2018 African journal of disability

9. Efficacy of intensive aphasia therapy in patients with chronic stroke: a randomised controlled trial

Efficacy of intensive aphasia therapy in patients with chronic stroke: a randomised controlled trial Recent evidence has fuelled the debate on the role of massed practice in the rehabilitation of chronic post-stroke aphasia. Here, we further determined the optimal daily dosage and total duration of intensive speech-language therapy.Individuals with chronic aphasia more than 1 year post-stroke received Intensive Language-Action Therapy in a randomised, parallel-group, blinded-assessment (...) , controlled trial. Participants were randomly assigned to one of two outpatient groups who engaged in either highly-intensive practice (Group I: 4 hours daily) or moderately-intensive practice (Group II: 2 hours daily). Both groups went through an initial waiting period and two successive training intervals. Each phase lasted 2 weeks. Co-primary endpoints were defined after each training interval.Thirty patients-15 per group-completed the study. A primary outcome measure (Aachen Aphasia Test) revealed

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2018 EvidenceUpdates

10. Assessment of aphasia

Assessment of aphasia Assessment of aphasia - Differential diagnosis of symptoms | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Assessment of aphasia Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: July 2018 Summary Aphasia is an acquired impairment of language that affects comprehension and production of words, sentences, and/or discourse. It is typically characterised by errors in word retrieval or selection, including: Semantic paraphasias (substituting (...) . Definitions: aphasia, dysarthria, and apraxia It is important to distinguish aphasia from dysarthria or apraxia. Aphasia is a selective impairment of language or the cognitive processes that underlie language. Individuals with dementia often have language problems, but they also have at least equally severe deficits in episodic memory, visuospatial skills and/or executive functions (e.g., organisation, planning, decision making). Dysarthria is an acquired disorder of speech production due to weakness

2018 BMJ Best Practice

11. Combined Dextroamphetamine and Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation in Poststroke Aphasia. (PubMed)

Combined Dextroamphetamine and Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation in Poststroke Aphasia. There is a growing need for various effective adjunctive treatment options for speech recovery after stroke. A pharmacological agent combined with noninvasive brain stimulation has not been previously reported for poststroke aphasia recovery. In this "proof of concept" study, we aimed to test the safety of a combined intervention consisting of dextroamphetamine, transcranial direct current stimulation (...) , and speech and language therapy in subjects with nonfluent aphasia. Ten subjects with chronic nonfluent aphasia underwent two experiments where they received dextroamphetamine or placebo along with transcranial direct current stimulation and speech and language therapy on two separate days. The Western Aphasia Battery-Revised was used to monitor changes in speech performance. No serious adverse events were observed. There was no significant increase in blood pressure with amphetamine or deterioration

2017 American journal of physical medicine & rehabilitation

12. Intensive speech and language therapy in patients with chronic aphasia after stroke: a randomised, open-label, blinded-endpoint, controlled trial in a health-care setting. (PubMed)

Intensive speech and language therapy in patients with chronic aphasia after stroke: a randomised, open-label, blinded-endpoint, controlled trial in a health-care setting.

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2017 Lancet

13. The Consequences of the Consequences: The Impact of the Environment on People With Aphasia Over Time (PubMed)

The Consequences of the Consequences: The Impact of the Environment on People With Aphasia Over Time Understanding the impact of the environment on the participation of people with aphasia depends on one's perspective. A long-term perspective provides a unique insight into the myriad of ways in which the environment can influence the participation of people living with aphasia over decades. In this article, the authors present the real-life story of "Hank," who has lived with aphasia for more (...) than 15 years. The authors consider how 2 different conceptual frameworks-the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health and the Social Determinants of Health-account for Hank's experience. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health is useful to conceptualize the range of factors that influence living with aphasia at a particular point in time. In contrast, the Social Determinants of Health is useful to conceptualize the cumulative impact

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2017 Topics in language disorders

14. Speech therapy for treatment of adults with primary progressive aphasia

Speech therapy for treatment of adults with primary progressive aphasia Speech therapy for treatment of adults with primary progressive aphasia Speech therapy for treatment of adults with primary progressive aphasia HAYES, Inc. Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation HAYES, Inc.. Speech therapy for treatment of adults with primary progressive aphasia (...) . Lansdale: HAYES, Inc.. Healthcare Technology Brief Publication. 2016 Authors' conclusions Description of Technology: Speech therapy is effective for patients with acquired aphasia (e.g., after a stroke). Speech therapy in patients with primary progressive aphasia (PPA) and other forms of aphasia should be tailored to the needs of the patient, the caregiver, and the progression of the patient's underlying disease. Speech therapy is necessarily subjective, and the selection of activities during therapy

2016 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

15. Speech and language therapy for aphasia following stroke. (PubMed)

Speech and language therapy for aphasia following stroke. Aphasia is an acquired language impairment following brain damage that affects some or all language modalities: expression and understanding of speech, reading, and writing. Approximately one third of people who have a stroke experience aphasia.To assess the effects of speech and language therapy (SLT) for aphasia following stroke.We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (last searched 9 September 2015), CENTRAL (2015, Issue (...) participants) assessed SLT with social support and stimulation; meta-analyses found no evidence of a difference in functional communication, but more participants withdrew from social support interventions than SLT. Thirty-eight randomised comparisons (1242 participants) assessed two approaches to SLT. Functional communication was significantly better in people with aphasia that received therapy at a high intensity, high dose, or over a long duration compared to those that received therapy at a lower

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2016 Cochrane

16. Aphasia rehabilitation best practice statements

Aphasia rehabilitation best practice statements Aphasia Rehabilitation Best Practice Statements 2014 Comprehensive supplement to the Australian Aphasia Rehabilitation Pathway www.aphasiapathway.com.au 2 Aphasia Rehabilitation Best Practice Statements 2014 ComprehensivesupplementtotheAustralianAphasiaRehabilitationPathway Contents :: PART 1 - INTRODUCTION 3 DEVELOPMENT OF THE BEST PRACTICE STATEMENTS 3 UNDERSTANDING THE PRESENTATION OF THE STATEMENTS 4 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 6 PART 2 - APHASIA (...) :: REFERENCE LIST 44 3 Aphasia Rehabilitation Best Practice Statements 2014 ComprehensivesupplementtotheAustralianAphasiaRehabilitationPathway PART 1 - INTRODUCTION DEVELOPMENT OF THE BEST PRACTICE STATEMENTS This document presents best practice statements for aphasia rehabilitation developed by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) funded Centre for Clinical Research Excellence (CCRE) in Aphasia Rehabilitation. The CCRE in Aphasia Rehabilitation is an Australian research group that has

2014 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

17. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) for improving aphasia in patients after stroke. (PubMed)

Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) for improving aphasia in patients after stroke. Stroke is one of the leading causes of disability worldwide. Aphasia among stroke survivors is common. Current speech and language therapy (SLT) strategies have only limited effectiveness in improving aphasia. A possible adjunct to SLT for improving SLT outcomes might be non-invasive brain stimulation by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to modulate cortical excitability and hence (...) to improve aphasia.To assess the effects of tDCS for improving aphasia in patients after stroke.We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (April 2013), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, March 2012), MEDLINE (1948 to March 2012), EMBASE (1980 to March 2012), CINAHL (1982 to March 2012), AMED (1985 to April 2012), Science Citation Index (1899 to April 2012) and seven additional databases. We also searched trials registers and reference lists

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2013 Cochrane

18. Communication and Low Mood (CALM): a randomized controlled trial of behavioural therapy for stroke patients with aphasia (PubMed)

Communication and Low Mood (CALM): a randomized controlled trial of behavioural therapy for stroke patients with aphasia The aim was to evaluate behavioural therapy as a treatment for low mood in people with aphasia.A randomized controlled trial comparing behavioural therapy plus usual care with a usual care control. Potential participants with aphasia after stroke were screened for the presence of low mood. Those who met the criteria and gave consent were randomly allocated.Participants were (...) recruited from hospital wards, community rehabilitation, speech and language therapy services and stroke groups.Of 511 people with aphasia identified, 105 had low mood and were recruited.Behavioural therapy was offered for up to three months. Outcomes were assessed three and six months after random allocation.Stroke Aphasic Depression Questionnaire, Visual Analog Mood Scales 'sad' item, and Visual Analogue Self-Esteem Scale.Participants were aged 29 to 94 years (mean 67.0, SD 13.5) and 66 (63%) were men

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2013 EvidenceUpdates

19. A systematic review of gesture treatments for post-stroke aphasia

A systematic review of gesture treatments for post-stroke aphasia A systematic review of gesture treatments for post-stroke aphasia A systematic review of gesture treatments for post-stroke aphasia Rose ML, Raymer AM, Lanyon LE, Attard MC CRD summary The authors concluded that there was some evidence of a benefit from combined gesture plus verbal treatment for some individuals with aphasia after a stroke. It was unclear whether this benefit was greater than that produced by verbal treatment (...) alone. The authors' cautious conclusions reflect the quality and amount of evidence presented. Authors' objectives To evaluate the effects of gesture training for patients with aphasia after a stroke. Searching MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, EMBASE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Clinical Aphasiology Conference archives were searched to September 2012; search terms were reported. Google Scholar was used to search the Internet. Reference lists of retrieved studies were checked. Study

2013 DARE.

20. Computer therapy compared with usual care for people with long-standing aphasia poststroke: a pilot randomized controlled trial

Computer therapy compared with usual care for people with long-standing aphasia poststroke: a pilot randomized controlled trial Computer therapy compared with usual care for people with long-standing aphasia poststroke: a pilot randomized controlled trial Computer therapy compared with usual care for people with long-standing aphasia poststroke: a pilot randomized controlled trial Palmer R, Enderby P, Cooper C, Latimer N, Julious S, Paterson G, Dimairo M, Dixon S, Mortley J, Hilton R, Delaney (...) aphasia after stroke. The authors concluded that their results indicated that the computer therapy was feasible and could be cost-effective, and it would be practical to recruit sufficient participants for a larger trial. There were issues with the reporting and methods, but the authors' conclusions appear to be appropriate for their objective. Type of economic evaluation Cost-utility analysis Study objective The objective was to assess the feasibility of conducting a randomised controlled trial

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2012 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.