Latest & greatest articles for Antibiotics in Pregnancy

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Top results for Antibiotics in Pregnancy

1. Prevalence of time-related bias in pharmacoepidemiology studies on the use of anti-emetics, antifungal, and antibiotic medications during pregnancy: a systematic review

Prevalence of time-related bias in pharmacoepidemiology studies on the use of anti-emetics, antifungal, and antibiotic medications during pregnancy: a systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability

2019 PROSPERO

2. Antibiotics for treating gonorrhoea in pregnancy. (PubMed)

Antibiotics for treating gonorrhoea in pregnancy. Gonorrhoea is a sexually transmitted infection that is caused by Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and is a major public health challenge today. N gonorrhoeae can be transmitted from the mother's genital tract to the newborn during birth, and can cause gonococcal ophthalmia neonatorum as well as systemic neonatal infections. It can also cause endometritis and pelvic sepsis in the mother. This review updates and replaces an earlier Cochrane Review (...) on antibiotics for treating this infectious condition.To assess the clinical effectiveness and harms of antibiotics for treating gonorrhoea in pregnant women.We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (31 May 2017), LILACS database (1982 to April 5, 2017), the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP; April 5, 2017), ClinicalTrials.gov (April 5, 2017), the ISRCTN Registry (April 5, 2017), and Epistemonikos (April 5, 2017). We also searched reference lists

2018 Cochrane

3. Use of antibiotics during pregnancy and risk of spontaneous abortion (PubMed)

Use of antibiotics during pregnancy and risk of spontaneous abortion Although antibiotics are widely used during pregnancy, evidence regarding their fetal safety remains limited. Our aim was to quantify the association between antibiotic exposure during pregnancy and risk of spontaneous abortion.We conducted a nested case-control study within the Quebec Pregnancy Cohort (1998-2009). We excluded planned abortions and pregnancies exposed to fetotoxic drugs. Spontaneous abortion was defined (...) as having a diagnosis or procedure related to spontaneous abortion before the 20th week of pregnancy. The index date was defined as the calendar date of the spontaneous abortion. Ten controls per case were randomly selected and matched by gestational age and year of pregnancy. Use of antibiotics was defined by filled prescriptions between the first day of gestation and the index date and was compared with (a) non-exposure and (b) exposure to penicillins or cephalosporins. We studied type of antibiotics

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2017 EvidenceUpdates

4. Antibiotics for asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy. (PubMed)

Antibiotics for asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy. Asymptomatic bacteriuria occurs in 2% to 10% of pregnancies and, if not treated, up to 30% of mothers will develop acute pyelonephritis. Asymptomatic bacteriuria has been associated with low birthweight and preterm birth.To assess the effect of antibiotic treatment for asymptomatic bacteriuria on the development of pyelonephritis and the risk of low birthweight and preterm birth.We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's (...) primary outcomes were assessed with GRADE software and given a quality rating. Evidence for pyelonephritis, preterm birth and birthweight less than 2500 g was assessed as of low or very low quality.While antibiotic treatment is effective in reducing the risk of pyelonephritis in pregnancy, the estimate of the effect is very uncertain because of the very low quality of the evidence. The reduction in low birthweight and preterm birth with antibiotic treatment is consistent with theories about the role

2015 Cochrane

5. Antibiotic prophylaxis during the second and third trimester to reduce adverse pregnancy outcomes and morbidity. (PubMed)

Antibiotic prophylaxis during the second and third trimester to reduce adverse pregnancy outcomes and morbidity. Several studies have suggested that prophylactic antibiotics given during pregnancy improved maternal and perinatal outcomes, while others have shown no benefit and some have reported adverse effects.To determine the effect of prophylactic antibiotics on maternal and perinatal outcomes during the second and third trimester of pregnancy for all women or women at risk of preterm (...) delivery.We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (30 April 2015) and reference lists of retrieved articles.Randomised controlled trials comparing prophylactic antibiotic treatment with placebo or no treatment for women in the second or third trimester of pregnancy before labour.We assessed trial quality and extracted data.The review included eight randomised controlled trials. Approximately 4300 women were recruited to detect the effect of prophylactic antibiotic

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2015 Cochrane

6. Different antibiotic regimens for treating asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy. (PubMed)

Different antibiotic regimens for treating asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy. Asymptomatic bacteriuria occurs in 5% to 10% of pregnancies and, if left untreated, can lead to serious complications.To assess which antibiotic is most effective and least harmful as initial treatment for asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy.We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (March 2010) and reference lists of retrieved studies.Randomized controlled trials comparing two (...) . Comparing cycloserine with sulphadimidine, no significant differences in symptomatic, persistent, or recurrent infections were noted.We cannot draw any definite conclusion on the most effective and safest antibiotic regimen for the initial treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy. One study showed advantages with a longer course of nitrofurantoin, and another showed better tolerability with ampicillin compared with pivmecillinam; otherwise, there was no significant difference demonstrated

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2010 Cochrane

7. Antibiotics for asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy. (PubMed)

Antibiotics for asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy. Asymptomatic bacteriuria occurs in 2% to 10% of pregnancies and, if not treated, up to 30% of mothers will develop acute pyelonephritis. Asymptomatic bacteriuria has been associated with low birthweight and preterm delivery.To assess the effect of antibiotic treatment for asymptomatic bacteriuria on persistent bacteriuria during pregnancy, the development of pyelonephritis and the risk of low birthweight and preterm delivery.We searched (...) the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (January 2007).Randomized trials comparing antibiotic treatment with placebo or no treatment in pregnant women with asymptomatic bacteriuria found on antenatal screening.We assessed trial quality.Fourteen studies were included. Overall the study quality was poor. Antibiotic treatment compared to placebo or no treatment was effective in clearing asymptomatic bacteriuria (risk ratio (RR) 0.25, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.14 to 0.48

2007 Cochrane

8. Antibiotics for bacterial vaginosis or Trichomonas vaginalis in pregnancy: a systematic review

Antibiotics for bacterial vaginosis or Trichomonas vaginalis in pregnancy: a systematic review Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2005 DARE.

9. Antibiotic treatment of bacterial vaginosis in pregnancy: a meta-analysis

Antibiotic treatment of bacterial vaginosis in pregnancy: a meta-analysis Antibiotic treatment of bacterial vaginosis in pregnancy: a meta-analysis Antibiotic treatment of bacterial vaginosis in pregnancy: a meta-analysis Leitich H, Brunbauer M, Bodner-Adler B, Kaider A, Egarter C, Husslein P CRD summary This review assessed antibiotic treatment for bacterial vaginosis in pregnant women. The authors concluded that the screening of women with a previous pre-term delivery is justified (...) studies are required in high-risk patients without pre-term labour and in patients with pre-term labour. They also stated that studies should assess the effectiveness of oral antibiotics given for a longer duration early in pregnancy in high-risk women, and evaluate the results using more restrictive definitions for pre-term delivery (less than 34 or less than 32 weeks). In addition, no further research on screen-and-treat strategies in low-risk women should be conducted. Bibliographic details Leitich

2003 DARE.

10. Antibiotics for syphilis diagnosed during pregnancy. (PubMed)

Antibiotics for syphilis diagnosed during pregnancy. Congenital syphilis is an increasing problem in many developing countries and in the transitional economies of Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union. In several countries this increase has been aggravated by HIV/AIDS. While the effectiveness of penicillin in the treatment of syphilis in pregnant women and the prevention of congenital syphilis was established shortly after the introduction of penicillin in the 1940s, there is uncertainty (...) about the optimal treatment regimens.To identify the most effective antibiotic treatment regimen (in terms of dose, length of course and mode of administration) of syphilis with and without concomitant infection with HIV for pregnant women infected with syphilis.MEDLINE 1966 to March 2000; EMBASE 1974 to March 2000, the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (last searched March 2001), the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth group trials register (last searched March 2001) and the references

2001 Cochrane

11. A decision analysis to guide antibiotic selection for chlamydia infection during pregnancy

A decision analysis to guide antibiotic selection for chlamydia infection during pregnancy A decision analysis to guide antibiotic selection for chlamydia infection during pregnancy A decision analysis to guide antibiotic selection for chlamydia infection during pregnancy Hueston W J, Lenhart J G Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions (...) addressed in the sensitivity analysis. Appropriate comparisons were made with other studies. Implications of the study The decision on which women to screen and when screening should occur is yet to be firmly established. Source of funding Supported in part by a Robert Wood Johnson Generalist Scholar award (Dr Hueston). Bibliographic details Hueston W J, Lenhart J G. A decision analysis to guide antibiotic selection for chlamydia infection during pregnancy. Archives of Family Medicine 1997; 6(6): 551

1997 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.