Latest & greatest articles for Anaphylaxis

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Top results for Anaphylaxis

41. Anaphylaxis from peanuts ingested by blood donors? (PubMed)

Anaphylaxis from peanuts ingested by blood donors? 21879920 2011 09 09 2018 05 10 1533-4406 365 9 2011 09 01 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Anaphylaxis from peanuts ingested by blood donors? 867-8; author reply 868 10.1056/NEJMc1106934 Vickery Brian P BP Burks A Wesley AW Sampson Hugh A HA eng Letter Comment United States N Engl J Med 0255562 0028-4793 0 Allergens AIM IM N Engl J Med. 2011 May 19;364(20):1981-2 21591965 Allergens blood Anaphylaxis etiology Arachis

2011 NEJM

42. Anaphylaxis: assessment and referral after emergency treatment

Anaphylaxis: assessment and referral after emergency treatment Anaph Anaphylaxis: assessment and referr ylaxis: assessment and referral al after emergency treatment after emergency treatment Clinical guideline Published: 14 December 2011 nice.org.uk/guidance/cg134 © NICE 2018. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and-conditions#notice-of- rights).Y Y our responsibility our responsibility The recommendations in this guideline represent the view of NICE (...) in this guideline should be interpreted in a way that would be inconsistent with complying with those duties. Commissioners and providers have a responsibility to promote an environmentally sustainable health and care system and should assess and reduce the environmental impact of implementing NICE recommendations wherever possible. Anaphylaxis: assessment and referral after emergency treatment (CG134) © NICE 2018. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions

2011 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

43. Glucocorticoids for the treatment of anaphylaxis. (PubMed)

Glucocorticoids for the treatment of anaphylaxis. Anaphylaxis is a serious hypersensitivity reaction that is rapid in onset and may result in death. Anaphylaxis guidelines recommend glucocorticoids for the treatment of people experiencing anaphylaxis.We sought to assess the benefits and harms of glucocorticoid treatment during episodes of anaphylaxis.We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2009, Issue 3), MEDLINE (Ovid) (1966 to September (...) 2009), EMBASE (Ovid) (1988 to September 2009), CINAHL (EBSCOhost) (to September 2009) and The Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED) (1945 to September 2009). We also searched the UK National Research Register and websites listing ongoing trials, and contacted international experts in anaphylaxis in an attempt to locate unpublished material.We included randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials comparing glucocorticoids with any control (either placebo, adrenaline (epinephrine

2010 Cochrane

44. Nebulised salbutamol or nebulised adrenaline for wheeze in anaphylaxis

Nebulised salbutamol or nebulised adrenaline for wheeze in anaphylaxis BestBets: Nebulised salbutamol or nebulised adrenaline for wheeze in anaphylaxis Nebulised salbutamol or nebulised adrenaline for wheeze in anaphylaxis Report By: Deepak Doshi - Specialist Registrar in Emergency Medicine Search checked by Bernard A Foëx - Consultant in Emergency Medicine and Critical Care Institution: Manchester Royal Infirmary Date Submitted: 2nd April 2007 Date Completed: 14th October 2009 Last Modified (...) : 1st September 2009 Status: Green (complete) Three Part Question In [patients with anaphylaxis] is [nebulised salbutamol better than nebulised adrenaline] at [reducing wheeze]? Clinical Scenario A 33 year school teacher arrives in the Emergency Department following a trip to the local botanical gardens. She has breathing difficulty with extensive expiratory wheeze and a florrid urticarial rash. She was given salbutamol by nebulizer in the ambulance. She continued to wheeze in the Emergency

2009 BestBETS

45. Adrenaline (epinephrine) for the treatment of anaphylaxis with and without shock. (PubMed)

Adrenaline (epinephrine) for the treatment of anaphylaxis with and without shock. Anaphylaxis is a serious hypersensitivity reaction that is rapid in onset and may cause death. Adrenaline is recommended as the initial treatment of choice for anaphylaxis.To assess the benefits and harms of adrenaline (epinephrine) in the treatment of anaphylaxis.We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2007, Issue 1), MEDLINE (1966 to March 2007), EMBASE (...) (1966 to March 2007), CINAHL (1982 to March 2007), BIOSIS (to March 2007), ISI Web of Knowledge (to March 2007) and LILACS (to March 2007). We also searched websites listing ongoing trials: http://clinicaltrials.gov/, http://www.controlledtrials.com and http://www.actr.org.au/; and contacted pharmaceutical companies and international experts in anaphylaxis in an attempt to locate unpublished material.Randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials comparing adrenaline with no intervention, placebo

2008 Cochrane

46. Epinephrine self-injection for anaphylaxis in children

Epinephrine self-injection for anaphylaxis in children BestBets: Epinephrine self-injection for anaphylaxis in children Epinephrine self-injection for anaphylaxis in children Report By: Richard Body - Specialist Registrar in Emergency Medicine Search checked by Deepak Doshi - Specialist Registrar in Emergency Medicine Institution: Manchester Royal Infirmary Date Submitted: 20th July 2005 Date Completed: 29th February 2008 Last Modified: 29th February 2008 Status: Green (complete) Three Part (...) Question In [children with anaphylaxis] does [self-injection of epinephrine] lead to [reduced mortality and morbidity]? Clinical Scenario A five year-old boy is admitted with severe anaphylactic shock having inadvertently ingested peanuts at a birthday party. He had a previous reaction two years ago and was given an epinephrine auto-injector for use at home. His mother had used this when the reaction first started but to no avail. You administer intramuscular epinephrine while wondering whether

2008 BestBETS

47. Cetuximab-induced anaphylaxis and IgE specific for galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose. (Full text)

Cetuximab-induced anaphylaxis and IgE specific for galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose. Cetuximab, a chimeric mouse-human IgG1 monoclonal antibody against the epidermal growth factor receptor, is approved for use in colorectal cancer and squamous-cell carcinoma of the head and neck. A high prevalence of hypersensitivity reactions to cetuximab has been reported in some areas of the United States.We analyzed serum samples from four groups of subjects for IgE antibodies against cetuximab: pretreatment

2008 NEJM

48. Platelet-activating factor, PAF acetylhydrolase, and severe anaphylaxis. (PubMed)

Platelet-activating factor, PAF acetylhydrolase, and severe anaphylaxis. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is an important mediator of anaphylaxis in animals, and interventions that block PAF prevent fatal anaphylaxis. The roles of PAF and PAF acetylhydrolase, the enzyme that inactivates PAF, in anaphylaxis in humans have not been reported.We measured serum PAF levels and PAF acetylhydrolase activity in 41 patients with anaphylaxis and in 23 control patients. Serum PAF acetylhydrolase activity (...) was also measured in 9 patients with peanut allergy who had fatal anaphylaxis and compared with that in 26 nonallergic pediatric control patients, 49 nonallergic adult control patients, 63 children with mild peanut allergy, 24 patients with nonfatal anaphylaxis, 10 children who died of nonanaphylactic causes, 15 children with life-threatening asthma, and 19 children with non-life-threatening asthma.Mean (+/-SD) serum PAF levels were significantly higher in patients with anaphylaxis (805+/-595 pg per

2008 NEJM

49. H1-antihistamines for the treatment of anaphylaxis with and without shock. (PubMed)

H1-antihistamines for the treatment of anaphylaxis with and without shock. Anaphylaxis is an acute systemic allergic reaction, which can be life-threatening. H1-antihistamines are commonly used as an adjuvant therapy in the treatment of anaphylaxis.To assess the benefits and harm of H1-antihistamines in the treatment of anaphylaxis.We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE (1966 to June 2006);EMBASE (1966 to June 2006); CINAHL (...) (1982 to June 2006) and ISI Web of Science (1945 to July 2006). We also contacted pharmaceutical companies and international experts in anaphylaxis in an attempt to locate unpublished material.Randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials comparing H1-antihistamines with placebo or no intervention.Two authors independently assessed articles for inclusion.We found no studies that satisfied the inclusion criteria.Based on this review, we are unable to make any recommendations for clinical practice

2007 Cochrane

50. An economic evaluation of prophylactic self-injectable epinephrine to prevent fatalities in children with mild venom anaphylaxis

An economic evaluation of prophylactic self-injectable epinephrine to prevent fatalities in children with mild venom anaphylaxis An economic evaluation of prophylactic self-injectable epinephrine to prevent fatalities in children with mild venom anaphylaxis An economic evaluation of prophylactic self-injectable epinephrine to prevent fatalities in children with mild venom anaphylaxis Shaker M S Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria (...) for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. CRD summary The study evaluated the cost-effectiveness of prophylactic self-injectable epinephrine to prevent fatalities in children with mild venom anaphylaxis. The author concluded that the intervention is not a cost-effective option if the annual venom-associated fatality rate is less than 2 per

2007 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

51. Paediatric - anaphylaxis/allergic reactions in children

Paediatric - anaphylaxis/allergic reactions in children INTRODUCTION Anaphylaxis in children is becoming increasingly common. Nut allergy is frequently seen and other allergies including drug allergies are not uncommon (see Table 1). Allergy to penicillin is over diagnosed and is less common that it would appear. This may be particularly so in children who have been given penicillin as part of treatment for a (usually viral) infection and then developed a rash. The chances are that the rash (...) is due to the infection, but such children are frequently labelled penicillin allergic. Rarer allergies such as latex allergy have been seen in children as young as 2 years of age. This has obvious implications for equipment use. Table 1 – Common precipitants Food is the most common cause of anaphylaxis, particularly peanuts, tree nuts (e.g. hazel, Food-induced brazil, walnut), ?sh and shell?sh. anaphylaxis Facial oedema, laryngeal oedema and respiratory dif?culty usually predominate. Insect stings

2007 Joint Royal Colleges Ambulance Liaison Committee

52. Specific Treatment Options - anaphylaxis/allergic reactions in adults

Specific Treatment Options - anaphylaxis/allergic reactions in adults INTRODUCTION Allergic reactions exist on a continuum from mild urticaria (hives) and/or angio-oedema (swelling of the face, eyelids, lips and tongue) to major pulmonary and/or cardiovascular compromise. The extreme end of the spectrum is anaphylaxis which can affect the cardiovascular, pulmonary, cutaneous, and gastrointestinal systems. It is an acute, life-threatening response in patients previously sensitised to an allergen (...) ; patients present with colicky abdominal pain, diarrhoea, nausea and vomiting. Patients may report a ‘sense of doom’. If signs of anaphylaxis are identi?ed, immediately correct A and B problems (administer oxygen (O2) (refer to oxygen protocol for administration and information) and adrenaline (refer to adrenaline protocol for administration and information), then pre- alert and transfer to the nearest suitable hospital as an emergency case. Continue management en-route. Some patients relapse hours

2007 Joint Royal Colleges Ambulance Liaison Committee

53. Anaphylaxis and allergic reactions in children

Anaphylaxis and allergic reactions in children INTRODUCTION Anaphylaxis in children is becoming increasingly common. Nut allergy is frequently seen and other allergies including drug allergies are not uncommon (see Table 1). Allergy to penicillin is over diagnosed and is less common that it would appear. This may be particularly so in children who have been given penicillin as part of treatment for a (usually viral) infection and then developed a rash. The chances are that the rash is due (...) to the infection, but such children are frequently labelled penicillin allergic. Rarer allergies such as latex allergy have been seen in children as young as 2 years of age. This has obvious implications for equipment use. Table 1 – Common precipitants Food is the most common cause of anaphylaxis, particularly peanuts, tree nuts (e.g. hazel, Food-induced brazil, walnut), ?sh and shell?sh. anaphylaxis Facial oedema, laryngeal oedema and respiratory dif?culty usually predominate. Insect stings are the second

2006 Joint Royal Colleges Ambulance Liaison Committee

54. Anaphylaxis / allergic reactions in adults

Anaphylaxis / allergic reactions in adults INTRODUCTION Allergic reactions exist on a continuum from mild urticaria (hives) and/or angio-oedema (swelling of the face, eyelids, lips and tongue) to major pulmonary and/or cardiovascular compromise. The extreme end of the spectrum is anaphylaxis which can affect the cardiovascular, pulmonary, cutaneous, and gastrointestinal systems. It is an acute, life-threatening response in patients previously sensitised to an allergen. In general, the longer (...) present with colicky abdominal pain, diarrhoea, nausea and vomiting. Patients may report a ‘sense of doom’. If signs of anaphylaxis are identi?ed, immediately correct A and B problems (administer oxygen (O2) (refer to oxygen protocol for administration and information) and adrenaline (refer to adrenaline protocol for administration and information), then pre- alert and transfer to the nearest suitable hospital as an emergency case. Continue management en-route. Some patients relapse hours after

2006 Joint Royal Colleges Ambulance Liaison Committee

55. The diagnosis and management of anaphylaxis: an updated practice parameter.

The diagnosis and management of anaphylaxis: an updated practice parameter. Guidelines and Measures | Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality HHS.gov Search ahrq.gov Search ahrq.gov Menu Topics A - Z Healthcare Delivery Latest available findings on quality of and access to health care Searchable database of AHRQ Grants, Working Papers & HHS Recovery Act Projects AHRQ Projects funded by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Trust Fund You are here Guidelines and Measures Funding

2005 Joint Council of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology

56. Idiopathic anaphylaxis: long-term follow-up, cost, and outlook

Idiopathic anaphylaxis: long-term follow-up, cost, and outlook Idiopathic anaphylaxis: long-term follow-up, cost, and outlook Idiopathic anaphylaxis: long-term follow-up, cost, and outlook Krasnick J, Patterson R, Harris K E Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability (...) of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology Oral corticosteroids, antihistamines and sympathomimetics in the treatment of patients with idiopathic anaphylaxis. Type of intervention Treatment. Economic study type Cost-effectiveness analysis. Study population Patients with idiopathic anaphylaxis. Setting Hospital. The economic study was carried out in Chicago, Illinois, USA. Dates to which data relate The data for the effectiveness analysis and resource use corresponded to the period between

1996 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.