Latest & greatest articles for Anaphylaxis

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Top results for Anaphylaxis

22. Management of maternal anaphylaxis in pregnancy: a case report (PubMed)

Management of maternal anaphylaxis in pregnancy: a case report A 26-year-old woman (gravida 2, para 1) at 25 weeks' gestation was brought to the emergency department because of anaphylactic symptoms. She reported eating Japanese soba and developed symptoms of dyspnea, generalized itchy rash, abdominal pain, and severe uterine contractions within 15-30 min of eating. She was immediately treated by normal saline infusion, two injections of epinephrine (intramuscularly), and a nebulized short (...) -acting β2-receptor agonist, followed by H1-antihistamine and methylprednisolone. Obstetrical management was undertaken by an obstetrician.The patient recovered rapidly without a biphasic reaction of anaphylaxis. After 11 weeks, a healthy, neurologically intact baby was born.Management of anaphylaxis in pregnant patients is basically the same of that in non-pregnant ones. Treatment should commence immediately to prevent further development of the anaphylaxis reaction and fetal neurological deficiency.

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2016 Acute medicine & surgery

24. ASCIA Clinical Update - Anaphylaxis

ASCIA Clinical Update - Anaphylaxis Disclaimer: ASCIA information is reviewed by ASCIA members and represents the available published literature at the time of review. The content of this document is not intended to replace professional medical advice and any questions regarding a medical diagnosis or treatment should be directed to a medical practitioner. © ASCIA 2016 Anaphylaxis Clinical Update This Clinical Update complements the latest version of ASCIA anaphylaxis e-training for health (...) professionals, which was first available in 2011. The main purpose of this document is to provide an evidence-based, ‘quick reference guide’ to assist primary health care physicians including general practitioners, paediatricians and nurses in the management of patients with allergy who are at risk of anaphylaxis. Contents Page 1. What is allergy and anaphylaxis? 2 1.1. Allergen sensitisation 1.2. Mechanisms of an allergic reaction 1.3. Definition of anaphylaxis 1.4. Signs and symptoms of allergy

2016 Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy

25. The global incidence of anaphylaxis in children from birth to 18 years old: protocol for a systematic review

The global incidence of anaphylaxis in children from birth to 18 years old: protocol for a systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation

2016 PROSPERO

26. Quality indicators for the acute and long-term management of anaphylaxis: a systematic review

Quality indicators for the acute and long-term management of anaphylaxis: a systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address

2016 PROSPERO

27. Anaphylaxis ? First Aid Management

Anaphylaxis ? First Aid Management ANZCOR Guideline 9.2.7 August 2016 Page 1 of 3 ANZCOR Guideline 9.2.7 – First Aid Management of Anaphylaxis Guideline Who does this guideline apply to? This guideline applies to adults, children and infant victims. Who is the audience for this guideline? This guideline is for use by bystanders, first aiders and first aid providers. 1 Introduction Anaphylaxis is the most severe form of allergic reaction and is potentially life threatening. It must be treated (...) as a medical emergency, requiring immediate treatment and urgent medical attention. Anaphylaxis is a generalised allergic reaction, which often involves more than one body system. A severe allergic reaction usually occurs within 20 minutes of exposure to the trigger. 1 Severe allergic reactions may occur without prior exposure to a trigger. It is characterised by rapidly developing airway and/or breathing and/or circulation problems usually associated with swelling, redness or itching of the skin, eyes

2016 Australian Resuscitation Council

28. ASCIA Checklists - Anaphylaxis

ASCIA Checklists - Anaphylaxis Anaphylaxis Checklist for GPs - Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy (ASCIA) | | Anaphylaxis Checklist for GPs Anaphylaxis Checklist for General Practice This checklist has been developed to assist General Practitioners optimise the management of patients with severe allergies who are at risk of anaphylaxis. Record history of the allergic reaction, suspected triggers and assess severity (e.g. using ASCIA anaphylaxis event record). Prescribe (...) initial adrenaline autoinjector for newly diagnosed patient and if necessary contact a specialist (allergy, respiratory, paediatrician) for authority prescription, pending specialist appointment. Refer to allergy specialist and provide relevant clinical history. Check adrenaline autoinjector expiry, renew prescription and check that the dose is appropriate for their weight/age : 10-20kg - 0.15mg device; Over 20kg - 0.30mg device. Complete and sign ASCIA Action Plan for Anaphylaxis. Complete and sign

2015 Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy

29. ASCIA Guidelines - Prevention of anaphylaxis in schools, pre-schools and childcare: 2015 update

ASCIA Guidelines - Prevention of anaphylaxis in schools, pre-schools and childcare: 2015 update POSITION PAPER ASCIA guidelines for prevention of anaphylaxis in schools, pre-schools and childcare: 2015 update Sandra Vale, 1 Jill Smith, 1 Maria Said, 2,3 Raymond James Mullins 2,4,5 and Richard Loh 2,6 1 Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy (ASCIA), 2 ASCIA Anaphylaxis Working Party, 3 Allergy & Anaphylaxis Australia, Sydney, New South Wales, 4 Health Sciences, University (...) ,stafftrainingintherecognitionandmanagementofacuteallergicreactions,planningfor unexpected reactions (including in those not previously identi?ed as being at risk), age appropriate education of children with severe allergies and their peers, and implementation of practical strategies to reduce the risk of accidental exposure to known allergic triggers. Strategy development also needs to take into account local or regional established legislative or procedural guidelines and the possibility that the ?rst episode of anaphylaxis may occur outside the home. Food

2015 Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy

30. Anaphylaxis in Seniors Receiving Intravenous Antibiotics in Long-Term Care: Clinical Evidence and Guidelines

Anaphylaxis in Seniors Receiving Intravenous Antibiotics in Long-Term Care: Clinical Evidence and Guidelines TITLE: Anaphylaxis in Seniors Receiving Intravenous Antibiotics in Long-Term Care: Clinical Evidence and Guidelines DATE: 30 October 2013 RESEARCH QUESTIONS 1. What is the clinical evidence regarding the occurrence of anaphylaxis in seniors receiving IV antibiotics for common acute infections in long-term care? 2. What are the evidence-based the guidelines regarding monitoring (...) and administration of IV antibiotics to seniors with common acute infections in long-term care? KEY MESSAGE No relevant technology assessment reports, systematic reviews, meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials, non-randomized studies, or evidence-based guidelines regarding the occurrence of anaphylaxis in seniors in long term care receiving IV antibiotics or the guidelines for their use were identified. METHODS A limited literature search was conducted on key resources including PubMed, Medline

2013 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

31. Anaphylaxis identification, management and prevention

Anaphylaxis identification, management and prevention 38 Reprinted from AustRAliAn F Amily PhysiciAn Vol. 42, no. 1/2, jAnuARy/FebRuARy 2013 Background Anaphylaxis is a severe allergic reaction that can cause death. In a similar trend to allergic conditions more broadly, anaphylaxis presentations are increasing in Australia. Objective This article summarises current knowledge regarding the identification, management and prevention of anaphylaxis, highlighting risk minimisation strategies (...) relevant to general practitioners. Discussion The most common causes of anaphylaxis are medication, food and insect venom. Medications are the most common cause of anaphylaxis in older adults, particularly antibiotics, anaesthetic drugs, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opiates. Food allergy is the most common cause of anaphylaxis in children, but rarely results in death. Anaphylaxis is a medical emergency requiring immediate treatment with adrenaline, as well as ongoing management. Important

2013 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

32. A systematic review and cost-effectiveness analysis of specialist services and adrenaline auto-injectors in anaphylaxis

A systematic review and cost-effectiveness analysis of specialist services and adrenaline auto-injectors in anaphylaxis A systematic review and cost-effectiveness analysis of specialist services and adrenaline auto-injectors in anaphylaxis Journals Library An error has occurred in processing the XML document An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again. >> >> >> Page Not Found Page not found (404) Sorry - the page you requested could not be found. Please choose a page from (...) the navigation or try a website search above to find the information you need. >> >> >> >> Issue {{metadata .Issue }} Toolkit 1)"> 0)"> 1)"> {{metadata.Title}} {{metadata.Headline}} Study found a lack of good data to inform the effectiveness of anaphylaxis intervention but concluded that both referral to a specialist service (SS) and prescription of adrenaline injectors are likely to be cost-effective, and so consideration of randomised controlled trials of the components of care in SSs was recommended

2013 NIHR HTA programme

33. Is propofol safe in patients with egg anaphylaxis?

Is propofol safe in patients with egg anaphylaxis? BestBets: Is propofol safe in patients with egg anaphylaxis? Is propofol safe in patients with egg anaphylaxis? Report By: Janos Peter Baombe - Senior Emergency Trainee Search checked by Khuram Parvez - Specialist Registrar Institution: Manchester Royal Infirmary Date Submitted: 18th December 2010 Date Completed: 15th April 2013 Last Modified: 15th April 2013 Status: Green (complete) Three Part Question [In patients with documented egg (...) anaphylaxis], is [the use of propofol as a sedative/anaesthetic agent] likely to result in an [allergic/anaphylactic reaction]? Clinical Scenario As you prepare one of your patients for conscious sedation in the emergency department she tells you that she has been allergic to eggs since childhood. Your colleague states that a documented egg allergy is a contraindication for the use of propofol but you have your doubts. You wonder if there is any published evidence or whether this is another medical myth

2013 BestBETS

34. The epidemiology of anaphylaxis in Europe: protocol for a systematic review

The epidemiology of anaphylaxis in Europe: protocol for a systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address: Timing and effect

2013 PROSPERO

35. The acute and longer-term management of anaphylaxis: protocol for a systematic review

The acute and longer-term management of anaphylaxis: protocol for a systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address: Timing

2013 PROSPERO

36. Systematic review of outcome measures in randomised controlled trials of pediatric anaphylaxis treatment

Systematic review of outcome measures in randomised controlled trials of pediatric anaphylaxis treatment Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web

2013 PROSPERO

37. Anaphylaxis in seniors eeceiving intravenous antibiotics in long-term care: clinical evidence and guidelines

Anaphylaxis in seniors eeceiving intravenous antibiotics in long-term care: clinical evidence and guidelines Anaphylaxis in seniors eeceiving intravenous antibiotics in long-term care: clinical evidence and guidelines Anaphylaxis in seniors eeceiving intravenous antibiotics in long-term care: clinical evidence and guidelines CADTH Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has (...) been made for the HTA database. Citation CADTH. Anaphylaxis in seniors eeceiving intravenous antibiotics in long-term care: clinical evidence and guidelines. Ottawa: Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH). Rapid Response - Summary of Abstracts. 2013 Authors' conclusions No relevant technology assessment reports, systematic reviews, meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials, non-randomized studies, or evidence-based guidelines regarding the occurrence of anaphylaxis

2013 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

38. Adrenaline auto-injectors for the treatment of anaphylaxis with and without cardiovascular collapse in the community. (PubMed)

Adrenaline auto-injectors for the treatment of anaphylaxis with and without cardiovascular collapse in the community. Anaphylaxis is a serious hypersensitivity reaction that is rapid in onset and may cause death. Adrenaline (epinephrine) auto-injectors are recommended as the initial, potentially life-saving treatment of choice for anaphylaxis in the community, but they are not universally available and have limitations in their use.To assess the effectiveness of adrenaline (epinephrine) auto (...) -injectors in relieving respiratory, cardiovascular, and other symptoms during episodes of anaphylaxis that occur in the community.We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 1), MEDLINE (Ovid SP) (1950 to January 2012), EMBASE (Ovid SP) (1980 to January 2012 ), CINAHL (EBSCO host) (1982 to January 2012 ), AMED (EBSCO host) (1985 to January 2012 ), LILACS, (BIREME) (1980 to January 2012 ), ISI Web of Science (1950 to January 2012 ). We

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2012 Cochrane

39. Anaphylaxis recognition and treatment

Anaphylaxis recognition and treatment RACGP - Anaphylaxis Search the RACGP website Latest issue December 2017 Vol 46(12) 881-960 Articles in the December issue discuss various health issues affecting school-aged children, including acne, eczema and growth disorders. Australian Family Physician Emergency Care June 2012 / / / / Focus Emergency Care Anaphylaxis Recognition and management Pages 366-370 Shelley J Kirkbright Simon GA Brown Background Anaphylaxis is a rapid onset, multisystem (...) hypersensitivity reaction. The diagnosis is usually straightforward, but may be difficult when skin signs are absent. Objective/s This article describes the recognition, assessment and evidence based management of anaphylaxis in the general practice setting. Discussion Published guidelines on the management of anaphylaxis are broadly consistent and emphasise the early use of intramuscular adrenaline, supine position, airway support and intravenous fluid resuscitation. Intravenous bolus doses of adrenaline

2012 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

40. Glucocorticoids for the treatment of anaphylaxis. (PubMed)

Glucocorticoids for the treatment of anaphylaxis. Anaphylaxis is a serious hypersensitivity reaction that is rapid in onset and may result in death. Anaphylaxis guidelines recommend glucocorticoids for the treatment of people experiencing anaphylaxis.We sought to assess the benefits and harms of glucocorticoid treatment during episodes of anaphylaxis.In our previous version we searched the literature until September 2009. In this version we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled (...) Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 3), MEDLINE (Ovid) (1956 to September 2011), EMBASE (Ovid) (1982 to September 2011), CINAHL (EBSCOhost) (to September 2011). We also searched the UK National Research Register and websites listing ongoing trials, and contacted international experts in anaphylaxis in an attempt to locate unpublished material.We planned to include randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials comparing glucocorticoids with any control (either placebo, adrenaline

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2012 Cochrane