Latest & greatest articles for Anaphylaxis

The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you wanted the latest trusted evidence on Anaphylaxis or other clinical topics then use Trip today.

This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on Anaphylaxis and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

What is Trip?

Trip is a clinical search engine designed to allow users to quickly and easily find and use high-quality research evidence to support their practice and/or care.

Trip has been online since 1997 and in that time has developed into the internet’s premier source of evidence-based content. Our motto is ‘Find evidence fast’ and this is something we aim to deliver for every single search.

As well as research evidence we also allow clinicians to search across other content types including images, videos, patient information leaflets, educational courses and news.

For further information on Trip click on any of the questions/sections on the left-hand side of this page. But if you still have questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com

Top results for Anaphylaxis

1. Association Between Intravenous Thrombolysis and Anaphylaxis Among Medicare Beneficiaries With Acute Ischemic Stroke

Association Between Intravenous Thrombolysis and Anaphylaxis Among Medicare Beneficiaries With Acute Ischemic Stroke Background and Purpose- Allergic reactions, including anaphylaxis, can sometimes occur after intravenous thrombolysis in patients with acute ischemic stroke. However, it remains unclear whether patients with stroke who receive thrombolytic agents face a higher risk of anaphylaxis than those who do not receive thrombolytics. Methods- We performed a retrospective cohort study using (...) code 99.10). Our primary outcome was anaphylaxis, defined using an accepted International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification code algorithm (989.5, 995.0-4, 995.6x, E905, E905.3, E905.5, or E905.8-9). A secondary outcome was anaphylactic shock (995.0 or 995.6x). Multiple logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between intravenous thrombolysis and anaphylaxis after adjustment for demographics, vascular risk factors, the Charlson comorbidity index

2019 EvidenceUpdates

3. ASCIA Guidelines - Acute management of anaphylaxis

ASCIA Guidelines - Acute management of anaphylaxis 1 Acute Management of Anaphylaxis These guidelines are intended for medical practitioners and nurses providing first responder emergency care. The appendix includes additional information for emergency department staff, ambulance staff, rural or remote medical practitioners and nurses providing emergency care. Anaphylaxis definitions • Any acute onset illness with typical skin features (urticarial rash or erythema/flushing, and/or angioedema (...) ), PLUS involvement of respiratory and/or cardiovascular and/or persistent severe gastrointestinal symptoms; or • Any acute onset of hypotension or bronchospasm or upper airway obstruction where anaphylaxis is considered possible, even if typical skin features are not present. The most common triggers of anaphylaxis (severe allergic reaction) are foods, insect stings and drugs (medications). Signs and symptoms of allergic reactions Mild or moderate reactions • Swelling of lips, face, eyes • Hives

2019 Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy

4. Perioperative Anaphylaxis Management Guidelines

Perioperative Anaphylaxis Management Guidelines Page 1 Guidelines Anaphylaxis 2016 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) and Australian and New Zealand Anaesthetic Allergy Group (ANZAAG) Perioperative Anaphylaxis Management Guidelines INTRODUCTON Anaphylaxis is a life-threatening emergency that requires prompt recognition of signs and symptoms, early administration of adrenaline (epinephrine) in adequate dosage, and aggressive volume replacement. Due to the paucity (...) of randomised controlled trials of sufficient quality on the management of anaphylaxis 1-6 the recommendations in these guidelines are consensus statements developed by the Australian and New Zealand Anaesthetic Allergy Group (ANZAAG) and the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) after a review of the literature 1-12 . Management of anaphylaxis consists of prompt diagnosis, immediate treatment, refractory management, and post crisis management. To facilitate the management of each

2019 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists

5. Anaphylaxis

Anaphylaxis Anaphylaxis - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Anaphylaxis Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: March 2019 Summary Sudden onset of respiratory or cardiovascular compromise, usually with a history of allergen exposure in sensitised individuals. Skin rash, wheezing and inspiratory stridor, hypotension, anxiety, nausea, and vomiting are the cardinal signs and symptoms. The diagnosis (...) is clinical. Allergy testing is helpful only for secondary prophylaxis. Securing the airway and initiating prompt treatment with epinephrine (adrenaline) may save lives. Comorbidities (e.g., coronary artery disease and COPD) may pose a treatment challenge and warrant expert consultation Definition Anaphylaxis is an acute, severe, life-threatening allergic reaction in pre-sensitised individuals, leading to a systemic response caused by the release of immune and inflammatory mediators from basophils

2019 BMJ Best Practice

6. Anaphylaxis

Anaphylaxis Anaphylaxis - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Anaphylaxis Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: March 2019 Summary Sudden onset of respiratory or cardiovascular compromise, usually with a history of allergen exposure in sensitised individuals. Skin rash, wheezing and inspiratory stridor, hypotension, anxiety, nausea, and vomiting are the cardinal signs and symptoms. The diagnosis (...) is clinical. Allergy testing is helpful only for secondary prophylaxis. Securing the airway and initiating prompt treatment with epinephrine (adrenaline) may save lives. Comorbidities (e.g., coronary artery disease and COPD) may pose a treatment challenge and warrant expert consultation Definition Anaphylaxis is an acute, severe, life-threatening allergic reaction in pre-sensitised individuals, leading to a systemic response caused by the release of immune and inflammatory mediators from basophils

2018 BMJ Best Practice

7. Angio-oedema and anaphylaxis

Angio-oedema and anaphylaxis Angio-oedema and anaphylaxis - NICE CKS Share Angio-oedema and anaphylaxis: Summary Angio-oedema is swelling of deep dermis, subcutaneous, or submucosal tissue, often affecting the face (lips, tongue, and eyelids), genitalia, hands, or feet. Less commonly, submucosal swelling affects the bowel and airway. The main types are allergic angio-oedema, non-allergic drug reaction (usually caused by angiotensin-converting enzyme [ACE] inhibitor treatment), hereditary angio (...) -oedema (an inherited genetic abnormality), acquired angio-oedema (usually secondary to lymphoma or a connective tissue disorder), and idiopathic angio-oedema. Anaphylaxis is a severe, life-threatening, generalized or systemic hypersensitivity reaction characterized by rapidly developing airway and/or breathing and/or circulation problems usually associated with skin and mucosal changes. The mechanism for angio-oedema and anaphylaxis is the same, as both histamine and/or bradykinin are involved

2018 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

8. CRACKCast E119 – Allergy, Hypersensitivity, Angioedema, and Anaphylaxis

CRACKCast E119 – Allergy, Hypersensitivity, Angioedema, and Anaphylaxis CRACKCast E119 – Allergy, Hypersensitivity, Angioedema, and Anaphylaxis - CanadiEM CRACKCast E119 – Allergy, Hypersensitivity, Angioedema, and Anaphylaxis In , by Chris Lipp October 19, 2017 This episode of CRACKCast covers Rosen’s Chapter 119 (109 in 9th), Allergy, Hypersensitivity, Angioedema, and Anaphylaxis. Patients suffering from acute allergic reactions, anaphylaxis, and angioedema are amongst the most unstable (...) , raised, and pruritic rash . Angioedema Another important syndrome, mediated by either an allergic (histaminergic) mechanism in response to exposure to foods, drugs, physical stimuli, or a non-allergic (non-histaminergic) mechanism (e.g., hereditary angioedema [HAE], or angiotensin-converting enzyme [ACE] inhibitor). Angioedema is characterized by edema of the subcutaneous or submucosal tissues, which can cause airway compromise if the tongue or larynx is involved. Anaphylaxis A life-threatening

2017 CandiEM

9. Drug‐induced anaphylaxis in the emergency room (PubMed)

Drug‐induced anaphylaxis in the emergency room Anaphylaxis is a life-threatening, systemic allergic reaction that presents unique challenges for emergency care practitioners. Anaphylaxis occurs more frequently than previously believed. Therefore, proper knowledge regarding the epidemiology, mechanisms, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of anaphylaxis is essential. In particular, the initial treatment strategy, followed by correct diagnosis, in the emergency room is critical for preventing (...) fatal anaphylaxis, although making a diagnosis is not easy because of the broad and often atypical presentation of anaphylaxis. To this end, the clinical criteria proposed by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and the Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network are useful, which, together with a differential diagnosis, could enable a more accurate diagnosis. Additional in vitro tests, such as plasma histamine and tryptase measurements, are also helpful. It should be emphasized

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2017 Acute medicine & surgery

11. ASCIA Checklist - Travel for people with allergy, asthma and anaphylaxis

ASCIA Checklist - Travel for people with allergy, asthma and anaphylaxis ASCIA Travel Plan: Anaphylaxis - Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy (ASCIA) | | ASCIA Travel Plan: Anaphylaxis Other travel information for people at risk of anaphylaxis is available from Allergy & Anaphylaxis Australia: Page updated January 2019 Site last updated: 6 Nov 2019 Member Login Remember Me Log in ASCIA Update Information for the community about allergic diseases, immunodeficiencies and other

2017 Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy

12. Management of maternal anaphylaxis in pregnancy: a case report (PubMed)

Management of maternal anaphylaxis in pregnancy: a case report A 26-year-old woman (gravida 2, para 1) at 25 weeks' gestation was brought to the emergency department because of anaphylactic symptoms. She reported eating Japanese soba and developed symptoms of dyspnea, generalized itchy rash, abdominal pain, and severe uterine contractions within 15-30 min of eating. She was immediately treated by normal saline infusion, two injections of epinephrine (intramuscularly), and a nebulized short (...) -acting β2-receptor agonist, followed by H1-antihistamine and methylprednisolone. Obstetrical management was undertaken by an obstetrician.The patient recovered rapidly without a biphasic reaction of anaphylaxis. After 11 weeks, a healthy, neurologically intact baby was born.Management of anaphylaxis in pregnant patients is basically the same of that in non-pregnant ones. Treatment should commence immediately to prevent further development of the anaphylaxis reaction and fetal neurological deficiency.

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2016 Acute medicine & surgery

13. Anaphylaxis ? First Aid Management

Anaphylaxis ? First Aid Management ANZCOR Guideline 9.2.7 August 2016 Page 1 of 3 ANZCOR Guideline 9.2.7 – First Aid Management of Anaphylaxis Guideline Who does this guideline apply to? This guideline applies to adults, children and infant victims. Who is the audience for this guideline? This guideline is for use by bystanders, first aiders and first aid providers. 1 Introduction Anaphylaxis is the most severe form of allergic reaction and is potentially life threatening. It must be treated (...) as a medical emergency, requiring immediate treatment and urgent medical attention. Anaphylaxis is a generalised allergic reaction, which often involves more than one body system. A severe allergic reaction usually occurs within 20 minutes of exposure to the trigger. 1 Severe allergic reactions may occur without prior exposure to a trigger. It is characterised by rapidly developing airway and/or breathing and/or circulation problems usually associated with swelling, redness or itching of the skin, eyes

2016 Australian Resuscitation Council

14. ASCIA Clinical Update - Anaphylaxis

ASCIA Clinical Update - Anaphylaxis Disclaimer: ASCIA information is reviewed by ASCIA members and represents the available published literature at the time of review. The content of this document is not intended to replace professional medical advice and any questions regarding a medical diagnosis or treatment should be directed to a medical practitioner. © ASCIA 2016 Anaphylaxis Clinical Update This Clinical Update complements the latest version of ASCIA anaphylaxis e-training for health (...) professionals, which was first available in 2011. The main purpose of this document is to provide an evidence-based, ‘quick reference guide’ to assist primary health care physicians including general practitioners, paediatricians and nurses in the management of patients with allergy who are at risk of anaphylaxis. Contents Page 1. What is allergy and anaphylaxis? 2 1.1. Allergen sensitisation 1.2. Mechanisms of an allergic reaction 1.3. Definition of anaphylaxis 1.4. Signs and symptoms of allergy

2016 Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy

16. ASCIA Checklists - Anaphylaxis

ASCIA Checklists - Anaphylaxis Anaphylaxis Checklist for GPs - Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy (ASCIA) | | Anaphylaxis Checklist for GPs Anaphylaxis Checklist for General Practice This checklist has been developed to assist General Practitioners optimise the management of patients with severe allergies who are at risk of anaphylaxis. Record history of the allergic reaction, suspected triggers and assess severity (e.g. using ASCIA anaphylaxis event record). Prescribe (...) initial adrenaline autoinjector for newly diagnosed patient and if necessary contact a specialist (allergy, respiratory, paediatrician) for authority prescription, pending specialist appointment. Refer to allergy specialist and provide relevant clinical history. Check adrenaline autoinjector expiry, renew prescription and check that the dose is appropriate for their weight/age : 10-20kg - 0.15mg device; Over 20kg - 0.30mg device. Complete and sign ASCIA Action Plan for Anaphylaxis. Complete and sign

2015 Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy

17. ASCIA Guidelines - Prevention of anaphylaxis in schools, pre-schools and childcare: 2015 update

ASCIA Guidelines - Prevention of anaphylaxis in schools, pre-schools and childcare: 2015 update POSITION PAPER ASCIA guidelines for prevention of anaphylaxis in schools, pre-schools and childcare: 2015 update Sandra Vale, 1 Jill Smith, 1 Maria Said, 2,3 Raymond James Mullins 2,4,5 and Richard Loh 2,6 1 Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy (ASCIA), 2 ASCIA Anaphylaxis Working Party, 3 Allergy & Anaphylaxis Australia, Sydney, New South Wales, 4 Health Sciences, University (...) ,stafftrainingintherecognitionandmanagementofacuteallergicreactions,planningfor unexpected reactions (including in those not previously identi?ed as being at risk), age appropriate education of children with severe allergies and their peers, and implementation of practical strategies to reduce the risk of accidental exposure to known allergic triggers. Strategy development also needs to take into account local or regional established legislative or procedural guidelines and the possibility that the ?rst episode of anaphylaxis may occur outside the home. Food

2015 Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy

18. Anaphylaxis in Seniors Receiving Intravenous Antibiotics in Long-Term Care: Clinical Evidence and Guidelines

Anaphylaxis in Seniors Receiving Intravenous Antibiotics in Long-Term Care: Clinical Evidence and Guidelines TITLE: Anaphylaxis in Seniors Receiving Intravenous Antibiotics in Long-Term Care: Clinical Evidence and Guidelines DATE: 30 October 2013 RESEARCH QUESTIONS 1. What is the clinical evidence regarding the occurrence of anaphylaxis in seniors receiving IV antibiotics for common acute infections in long-term care? 2. What are the evidence-based the guidelines regarding monitoring (...) and administration of IV antibiotics to seniors with common acute infections in long-term care? KEY MESSAGE No relevant technology assessment reports, systematic reviews, meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials, non-randomized studies, or evidence-based guidelines regarding the occurrence of anaphylaxis in seniors in long term care receiving IV antibiotics or the guidelines for their use were identified. METHODS A limited literature search was conducted on key resources including PubMed, Medline

2013 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

19. Anaphylaxis identification, management and prevention

Anaphylaxis identification, management and prevention 38 Reprinted from AustRAliAn F Amily PhysiciAn Vol. 42, no. 1/2, jAnuARy/FebRuARy 2013 Background Anaphylaxis is a severe allergic reaction that can cause death. In a similar trend to allergic conditions more broadly, anaphylaxis presentations are increasing in Australia. Objective This article summarises current knowledge regarding the identification, management and prevention of anaphylaxis, highlighting risk minimisation strategies (...) relevant to general practitioners. Discussion The most common causes of anaphylaxis are medication, food and insect venom. Medications are the most common cause of anaphylaxis in older adults, particularly antibiotics, anaesthetic drugs, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opiates. Food allergy is the most common cause of anaphylaxis in children, but rarely results in death. Anaphylaxis is a medical emergency requiring immediate treatment with adrenaline, as well as ongoing management. Important

2013 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

20. A systematic review and cost-effectiveness analysis of specialist services and adrenaline auto-injectors in anaphylaxis

A systematic review and cost-effectiveness analysis of specialist services and adrenaline auto-injectors in anaphylaxis A systematic review and cost-effectiveness analysis of specialist services and adrenaline auto-injectors in anaphylaxis Journals Library An error has occurred in processing the XML document An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again. >> >> >> Page Not Found Page not found (404) Sorry - the page you requested could not be found. Please choose a page from (...) the navigation or try a website search above to find the information you need. >> >> >> >> Issue {{metadata .Issue }} Toolkit 1)"> 0)"> 1)"> {{metadata.Title}} {{metadata.Headline}} Study found a lack of good data to inform the effectiveness of anaphylaxis intervention but concluded that both referral to a specialist service (SS) and prescription of adrenaline injectors are likely to be cost-effective, and so consideration of randomised controlled trials of the components of care in SSs was recommended

2013 NIHR HTA programme