Latest & greatest articles for Alcohol Tremor

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Top results for Alcohol Tremor

1. Were James Bond's drinks shaken because of alcohol induced tremor? (PubMed)

Were James Bond's drinks shaken because of alcohol induced tremor? To quantify James Bond's consumption of alcohol as detailed in the series of novels by Ian Fleming.Retrospective literature review.The study authors' homes, in a comfy chair.Commander James Bond, 007; Mr Ian Lancaster Fleming.Weekly alcohol consumption by Commander Bond.All 14 James Bond books were read by two of the authors. Contemporaneous notes were taken detailing every alcoholic drink taken. Predefined alcohol unit levels (...) and an early death. The level of functioning as displayed in the books is inconsistent with the physical, mental, and indeed sexual functioning expected from someone drinking this much alcohol. We advise an immediate referral for further assessment and treatment, a reduction in alcohol consumption to safe levels, and suspect that the famous catchphrase "shaken, not stirred" could be because of alcohol induced tremor affecting his hands.

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2013 BMJ