Latest & greatest articles for Adrenal Mass

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Top results for Adrenal Mass

1. Assessment of incidental adrenal mass

Assessment of incidental adrenal mass Assessment of incidental adrenal mass - Differential diagnosis of symptoms | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Assessment of incidental adrenal mass Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: June 2018 Summary Incidental adrenal masses are typically found during radiological imaging of kidneys and adrenals. They are classified as hormonally active or non-functioning, and as malignant or benign (...) . Biochemical and imaging evaluations are required to determine this taxonomy. Grumbach MM, Biller BM, Braunstein GD, et al. Management of the clinically inapparent adrenal mass ("incidentaloma"). Ann Intern Med. 2003;138:424-429. http://www.annals.org/cgi/content/full/138/5/424 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12614096?tool=bestpractice.com Adrenal masses are among the most common tumours in humans. The prevalence of clinically inapparent adrenal masses increases with age, being <1% for patients younger

2018 BMJ Best Practice

2. Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia Presenting as an Adrenal Mass With Increased 18F-FDG Positron Emission Tomography Uptake (PubMed)

Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia Presenting as an Adrenal Mass With Increased 18F-FDG Positron Emission Tomography Uptake This article describes congenital adrenal hyperplasia presenting as an adrenal mass with increased 18F-FDG positron emission tomography uptake.

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2017 Journal of the Endocrine Society

3. A Liquid Chromatography/Tandem Mass Spectometry Profile of 16 Serum Steroids, Including 21-Deoxycortisol and 21-Deoxycorticosterone, for Management of Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (PubMed)

A Liquid Chromatography/Tandem Mass Spectometry Profile of 16 Serum Steroids, Including 21-Deoxycortisol and 21-Deoxycorticosterone, for Management of Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) due to steroid 21-hydroxylase deficiency (CAH21) is most often diagnosed by newborn screening. The classic parameter studied is 17-hydroxy-progesterone, but the positive predictive value for the diagnosis of CAH is low in full-term newborns and even lower in preterm newborns.To (...) evaluate the diagnostic utility of simultaneously quantifying a large number of steroids by using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) from a small serum volume in patients with CAH, particularly during the neonatal period.LC-MS/MS was applied to sera from patients with CAH who had a classic form (n = 48) and rare forms (n = 2) of 21-hydroxylase deficiency, normal preterm (n = 10) and normal full-term (n = 20) neonates, and young patients without CAH (non-CAH; n = 149

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2017 Journal of the Endocrine Society

4. Incidentally Discovered Adrenal Mass

Incidentally Discovered Adrenal Mass Date of origin: 1996 Last review date: 2012 ACR Appropriateness Criteria ® 1 Incidentally Discovered Adrenal Mass American College of Radiology ACR Appropriateness Criteria ® Clinical Condition: Incidentally Discovered Adrenal Mass Variant 1: No history of malignancy; mass 1-4 cm in diameter. Initial evaluation. Radiologic Procedure Rating Comments RRL* CT abdomen without IV contrast 8 Presumes that a noncontrast CT has not already been performed (...) Only for suspicion of pheochromocytoma. ??? MRI abdomen without and with IV contrast 2 O US adrenal gland 1 O Biopsy adrenal gland 1 Varies CT abdomen with IV contrast 1 ??? X-ray abdomen 1 ?? Iodocholesterol scan 1 This agent may be used to detect functionally active adenomas. ???? FDG-PET/CT skull base to mid-thigh 1 ???? Rating Scale: 1,2,3 Usually not appropriate; 4,5,6 May be appropriate; 7,8,9 Usually appropriate *Relative Radiation Level Variant 2: No history of malignancy; mass 1–4 cm

2012 American College of Radiology

5. Characterization of adrenal masses by using FDG PET: a systematic review and meta-analysis of diagnostic test performance

Characterization of adrenal masses by using FDG PET: a systematic review and meta-analysis of diagnostic test performance Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2011 DARE.

6. Management of the clinically inapparent adrenal mass ("incidentaloma"). (PubMed)

Management of the clinically inapparent adrenal mass ("incidentaloma"). The National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Program convened surgeons, endocrinologists, pathologists, biostatisticians, radiologists, oncologists, and other health care professionals, as well as members of the general public, to address the causes, prevalence, and natural history of clinically inapparent adrenal masses, or "incidentalomas"; the appropriate evaluation and treatment of such masses; and directions (...) for future research. Improvements in abdominal imaging techniques have increased detection of adrenal incidentalomas, and because the prevalence of these masses increases with age, appropriate management of adrenal tumors will be a growing challenge in our aging society. To address six predetermined questions, the 12-member nonfederal, nonadvocate state-of-the-science panel heard presentations from 21 experts in adrenal incidentalomas and consulted a systematic review of medical literature on the topic

2003 Annals of Internal Medicine

7. Management of clinically inapparent adrenal mass

Management of clinically inapparent adrenal mass Management of clinically inapparent adrenal mass Management of clinically inapparent adrenal mass Lau J, Balk E, Rothberg M, Ioannidis J P A, DeVine D, Chew P, Kupelnik B, Miller K Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Lau J, Balk E, Rothberg M, Ioannidis J P A, DeVine D, Chew P (...) , Kupelnik B, Miller K. Management of clinically inapparent adrenal mass. Rockville: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). Evidence Report/Technology Assessment No. 56. 2002 Authors' objectives This report aims to assess the available evidence on the management of clinically inapparent adrenal mass. The widespread use of computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and ultrasound imaging (US) has resulted in the incidental discovery of asymptomatic adrenal masses (also

2002 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

8. Management of the Clinically Inapparent Adrenal Mass ("Incidentaloma")

Management of the Clinically Inapparent Adrenal Mass ("Incidentaloma") NIH State-of-the-Science Statement on Management of the Clinically Inapparent Adrenal Mass (“Incidentaloma”) NIH Consensus and State-of-the-Science Statements Volume 19, Number 2 February 4–6, 2002 NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH Office of the Director About the NIH Consensus Development Program NIH Consensus Development and State-of-the-Science Conferences are convened to evaluate the available scientific evidence on a given (...) -of-the-Science Statement on management of the clinically inapparent adrenal mass (“incidentaloma”). NIH Consens State Sci Statements. 2002 Feb 4–6; 19(2) 1–23. Publications Ordering Information NIH Consensus Statements, State-of-the-Science Statements, and Tech­ nology Assessment Statements and related materials are available by writing to the NIH Consensus Program Information Center, P.O. Box 2577, Kensington, MD 20891; by calling toll free 1-888-NIH-CONSENSUS (888-644-2667); or by visiting the NIH

2002 NIH Consensus Statements

9. Adrenal mass evaluation in patients with lung carcinoma: a cost-effectiveness analysis

Adrenal mass evaluation in patients with lung carcinoma: a cost-effectiveness analysis Adrenal mass evaluation in patients with lung carcinoma: a cost-effectiveness analysis Adrenal mass evaluation in patients with lung carcinoma: a cost-effectiveness analysis Remer E M, Obuchowski N, Ellis J D, Rice T W, Adelstein D J, Baker M E Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary (...) of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology Strategies for adrenal mass evaluation in patients with lung carcinoma. The following strategies were evaluated: (1) CT (0 H) followed by MR imaging followed by CT biopsy; (2) CT (10 H) followed by MR imaging followed by CT biopsy; (3) CT (0 H) followed by CT biopsy; (4) CT (10 H) followed by CT biopsy; (5) MR imaging followed by CT (0 H) followed

2000 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.