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161. AAN Guideline on Botulinum Neurotoxin

.), Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA; and Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (S.A.Y.), University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. Mark Hallett From the Department of Neurology (D.M.S., M.W.G.), Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY; Human Motor Control Section (M.H.), National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (B.P.K.), National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD; Department of Neurology (E.J.A.), Bronson Neuroscience Center, Bronson Methodist Hospital, Kalamazoo (...) ; Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences (Y.T.S.), Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA; and Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (S.A.Y.), University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. Mark W. Green From the Department of Neurology (D.M.S., M.W.G.), Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY; Human Motor Control Section (M.H.), National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (B.P.K.), National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD; Department of Neurology (E.J.A.), Bronson

2016 American Association of Neuromuscular & Electrodiagnostic Medicine

162. Acute Myocardial Infarction in Women

article Acute Myocardial Infarction in Women A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association , MD, FAHA, Chair , PhD, FAHA, Co-Chair , PhD, RN, FAHA , MD , MD, SM, FAHA , MD, MPH , MD , MD, PhD, FAHA , MD, MHS, MSc, FAHA , and MD, PhD MD, FAHAon behalf of the American Heart Association Cardiovascular Disease in Women and Special Populations Committee of the Council on Clinical Cardiology, Council on Epidemiology and Prevention, Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing, and Council (...) on Quality of Care and Outcomes Research Laxmi S. Mehta , Theresa M. Beckie , Holli A. DeVon , Cindy L. Grines , Harlan M. Krumholz , Michelle N. Johnson , Kathryn J. Lindley , Viola Vaccarino , Tracy Y. Wang , Karol E. Watson , and Nanette K. Wenger and on behalf of the American Heart Association Cardiovascular Disease in Women and Special Populations Committee of the Council on Clinical Cardiology, Council on Epidemiology and Prevention, Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing, and Council

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2016 American Heart Association

163. ICU Admission, Discharge, and Triage Guidelines

does occur in hospital wards, usually during the activation of a RRS, deploying a rapid response team, or when a critical care bed is not immediately available to an acutely ill general ward patient. In some institutions, chronic critically ill patients are transferred from the ICU to the general ward for such processes as weaning from mechanical ventilation or starting rehabilitation. Although a randomized controlled trial would be difficult, several retrospective and observational studies have (...) , the literature does not support a survival benefit for specialized over general ICU care in the case of common admitting diagnoses such as acute coronary syndrome, ischemic stroke, intracranial hemorrhage, pneumonia, abdominal surgery, or coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Admission to a specialized ICU of a patient with a primary diagnosis not associated with that specialty (i.e., “boarding”) is associated with increased risk-adjusted mortality ( ). Although there are notable limitations in published

2016 Society of Critical Care Medicine

164. Preventing and Experiencing Ischemic Heart Disease as a Woman: State of the Science

you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Free Access article Share on Jump to Free Access article Preventing and Experiencing Ischemic Heart Disease as a Woman: State of the Science A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association , PhD, RN, FAHA, Chair , PhD, RN, FAHA, Vice Chair , PhD, RN, ACNS-BC , PhD, CNP, FAHA , PhD, MPH , MD, MSPH , MD , MD, MS, FAHA , MD, FAHA , and PhD, APRN, FAHA PhDon behalf of the American Heart Association Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing, Council (...) on Clinical Cardiology, Council on Epidemiology and Prevention, Council on Hypertension, Council on Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health, and Council on Quality of Care and Outcomes Research Jean C. McSweeney , Anne G. Rosenfeld , Willie M. Abel , Lynne T. Braun , Lora E. Burke , Stacie L. Daugherty , Gerald F. Fletcher , Martha Gulati , Laxmi S. Mehta , Christina Pettey , and Jane F. Reckelhoff and on behalf of the American Heart Association Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing, Council

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2016 American Heart Association

165. Use of Antipsychotics to Treat Agitation or Psychosis in Patients With Dementia

of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation HR Hazard ratio ICD-10 International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision IR Immediate release IRR Incidence rate ratio ITT Intention to treat MDS Minimum data set MI Myocardial infarction MMSE Mini-Mental State Examination NC Not calculated NIA National Institute on Aging NIMH National Institute of Mental Health NINCDS/ADRDA National Institute of Neurologi- cal and Communicative Diseases and Stroke/Alzhei- mer’s Disease and Related Disorders (...) medications (see section “Review of Supporting Research Evidence” in Appendix A). However, as with studies of antipsychotic benefits, the limitations of existing research make it difficult to draw precise con- clusions about the likely harms of treatment for an individual patient. In addition to mortality , other serious adverse events of antipsychotic medications in individuals with dementia have been reported, including stroke, acute cardiovascular events, metabolic effects, and pulmonary effects (see

2016 American Psychiatric Association

166. Importance of Assessing Cardiorespiratory Fitness in Clinical Practice: A Case for Fitness as a Clinical Vital Sign: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association

, PT, FAHA , MD, MPH, PhD , PhD, FAHA , PhD, FAHA , PhD , PhD, FAHA , MD, FAHA , MD , PhD, FAHA , MD, PhD, MBA , MD , PhD , and MD, MPH, PhD PhDOn behalf of the American Heart Association Physical Activity Committee of the Council on Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health; Council on Clinical Cardiology; Council on Epidemiology and Prevention; Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing; Council on Functional Genomics and Translational Biology; and Stroke Council Robert Ross , Steven N. Blair , Ross (...) Arena , Timothy S. Church , Jean-Pierre Després , Barry A. Franklin , William L. Haskell , Leonard A. Kaminsky , Benjamin D. Levine , Carl J. Lavie , Jonathan Myers , Josef Niebauer , Robert Sallis , Susumu S. Sawada , Xuemei Sui , and Ulrik Wisløff and On behalf of the American Heart Association Physical Activity Committee of the Council on Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health; Council on Clinical Cardiology; Council on Epidemiology and Prevention; Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing

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2016 American Heart Association

167. Sexual Activity and Cardiovascular Disease

, excessive dyspnea, ischemic ST-segment changes, cyanosis, hypotension, or arrhythmia (Class IIa; Level of Evidence C) . Cardiac rehabilitation and regular exercise can be useful to reduce the risk of cardiovascular complications with sexual activity for patients with CVD (Class IIa; Level of Evidence B) . , Patients with unstable, decompensated, and/or severe symptomatic CVD should defer sexual activity until their condition is stabilized and optimally managed (Class III; Level of Evidence C) . Patients (...) ), sexual activity should be deferred until the patient is stabilized and optimally managed. In patients whose exercise capacity or cardiovascular risk is unknown, exercise stress testing can be useful to assess exercise capacity and development of symptoms, ischemia, cyanosis, hypotension, or arrhythmias. Exercise training during cardiac rehabilitation has been shown to increase maximum exercise capacity and decrease peak coital heart rate. Regular exercise is associated with a decreased risk of sexual

2012 American Heart Association

168. Management of Hyperglycemia in Hospitalized Patients in Non-critical Care Setting

; 95% confidence interval, 0.21–0.77). There was a trend for increased risk of hypoglycemia (relative risk, 1.58; 95% confidence interval, 0.97–2.57) that was most common in surgical studies. There was no significant effect on death, myocardial infarction, or stroke. The definition of “intensive control” varied across studies but was generally consistent with BG targets in the ADA/American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists Practice Guideline ( , ). That guideline recommended a premeal

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2012 The Endocrine Society

169. 2012 ACCF/AHA/HRS Focused Update Incorporated Into the ACCF/AHA/HRS 2008 Guidelines for Device-Based Therapy of Cardiac Rhythm Abnormalities

Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy e303 2.5. Pacing in Children, Adolescents, and Patients With Congenital Heart Disease e303 2.6. Selection of Pacemaker Device e305 2.6.1. Major Trials Comparing Atrial or Dual-Chamber Pacing With Ventricular Pacing e306 2.6.2. Quality of Life and Functional StatusEnd Points e306 2.6.3. Heart Failure End Points e307 2.6.4. Atrial Fibrillation End Points e307 2.6.5. Stroke or Thromboembolism End Points e307 2.6.6. Mortality End Points e307 2.6.7. Importance of Minimizing

2012 American Heart Association

170. AAN Guideline on Intravenous Immunoglobulin in the Treatment of Neuromuscular Disorders

IBM. Recommendation. Evidence is insufficient to support or refute the use of IVIg in treating IBM (Level U). Clinical context. There is presently no effective treatment for IBM. Postpolio syndrome. Two Class I studies evaluated IVIg efficacy in patients with postpolio syndrome. , The first study, a double-blind RCT, evaluated 142 patients with postpolio syndrome, most with severe weakness (Class IV or V based on the National Rehabilitation Postpolio Limb Classification). The 2 primary outcome (...) ), and renal failure (n = 1). These findings do not exclude the possibility of rare AEs such as stroke and thrombotic events, which have been previously reported with IVIg. It is important to screen for vascular risk factors before infusion and to monitor carefully during and after infusion. , , The most common IVIg-related AEs included headache (16.1%), fever (6.6%), mild hypertension (4.6%), chills (3.3%), nausea (3.2%), asthenia (1.4%), arthralgia (1.3%), anorexia (1.1%), dizziness (1.1%), malaise (1.1

2012 American Association of Neuromuscular & Electrodiagnostic Medicine

171. Guidelines for the use of an insulin infusion for the management of hyperglycemia in critically ill patients

(PubMed, OVID, Google Scholar, reference lists from other publications, search of Clinicaltrials.gov, and the expertise and experience of the authors). Searches were performed periodically until the end of 2010 using the following terms: acute stroke, BG, cardiac surgery, critical care , critical illness, critically ill patients, dextrose, glucose, glucose control, glucose metabolism, glucose meters, glucose toxicity, glycemic control , glycemic variability, hyperglycemia , hypoglycemia, ICU, insulin (...) , insulin infusion, insulin protocols, insulin resistance, insulin therapy, intensive care, intensive insulin therapy, mortality, myocardial infarction, neurocognitive function, neuroprotection, outcomes, pediatric, pediatric intensive care, point-of-care, point-of-care testing, sepsis, sternal wound infection, stress hyperglycemia , stress, stress hormones, stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage, surgery, tight glycemic control protocols, and traumatic brain injury (TBI). Published clinical trials were used

2012 Society of Critical Care Medicine

172. A Call to Action: Women and Peripheral Artery Disease

Lower extremity atherosclerotic peripheral artery disease (PAD) has a very high prevalence in most nations and in the United States. Lower extremity PAD is now known to be associated with equal morbidity and mortality and comparable (or higher) health economic costs as coronary heart disease (CHD) and ischemic stroke. , Yet where surveyed, the public and clinicians (as well as health payers and government agencies) do not yet fully recognize the risks associated with PAD. For decades, clinicians did (...) statement is a “call to action.” We hope these data and recommendations will motivate specific actions to address this challenge and thus help to improve PAD-related and global cardiovascular health. Epidemiology of PAD in Women Prevalence of PAD The population-based prevalence of PAD in women has been incompletely evaluated. In contrast to the abundant data defining the gender-specific prevalence of CAD and stroke, few population surveys of PAD have been performed, and ongoing PAD surveillance

2012 American Heart Association

173. Intravenous immunoglobulin in the treatment of neuromuscular disorders

IBM. Recommendation. Evidence is insufficient to support or refute the use of IVIg in treating IBM (Level U). Clinical context. There is presently no effective treatment for IBM. Postpolio syndrome. Two Class I studies evaluated IVIg efficacy in patients with postpolio syndrome. , The first study, a double-blind RCT, evaluated 142 patients with postpolio syndrome, most with severe weakness (Class IV or V based on the National Rehabilitation Postpolio Limb Classification). The 2 primary outcome (...) ), and renal failure (n = 1). These findings do not exclude the possibility of rare AEs such as stroke and thrombotic events, which have been previously reported with IVIg. It is important to screen for vascular risk factors before infusion and to monitor carefully during and after infusion. , , The most common IVIg-related AEs included headache (16.1%), fever (6.6%), mild hypertension (4.6%), chills (3.3%), nausea (3.2%), asthenia (1.4%), arthralgia (1.3%), anorexia (1.1%), dizziness (1.1%), malaise (1.1

2012 American Academy of Neurology

174. Key Data Elements and Definitions for Peripheral Atherosclerotic Vascular Disease

and stroke, respectively. The specific goals of clinical data standards are 1. To establish a consistent, interoperable, and universal clinical vocabulary as a foundation to both clinical care and clinical research 2. To promote the ubiquitous use of electronic health records and facilitate the exchange of data across systems through harmonized, standardized definitions of key data elements 3. To facilitate the further development of clinical registries, quality and performance improvement programs (...) (Claudication: Exercise Vs Endoluminal Revascularization) Study ( ); CORAL (Cardiovascular Outcome in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions) trials ( ); National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Common Data Elements ( ); and the AHA Get With The Guidelines–Stroke Program ( ). 2.4 Defining Data Elements The definitions of the data elements developed by the writing committee are broad enough for use in various aspects of data collection but specific enough to promote uniform and simplified

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2012 Congress of Neurological Surgeons

175. Clinical Recommendations for Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing Data Assessment in Specific Patient Populations

Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany3Department of Cardiology, Antwerp University Hospital, Edegem, Belgium4Department of Prevention and Sports Medicine, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany; Munich Heart Association, Munich, Germany5Exercise Pathophysiology Laboratory, Cardiac Rehabilitation Division, S. Maugeri Foundation IRCCS, Scientific Institute of Veruno, Veruno (NO), Italy6Research Centre for Cardiovascular and Respiratory Rehabilitation, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, KU Leuven (...) (University of Leuven), Leuven, Belgium7Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation – Division of Physical Therapy and Department of Internal Medicine – Division of Cardiology, University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque, NM, USA8Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Jacksonville, FL, USA9Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA10Department of Medicine, Section on Cardiology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA11Department

2012 American Heart Association

176. Reporting Standards for Carotid Artery Angioplasty and Stent Placement

disease is the third leading cause of death in the United States (1,2). Approximately 750000peoplehaveastrokeannually, costing an estimated $45 billion in treatment and lost productivity (3,4). Carotid occlusive disease is responsi- ble for 25% of these strokes (5). Large population-based studies indicate that the prevalence of carotid stenosis is approximately 0.5% after age 60 and increases to 10% in persons older than age 80 years. The majority of cases are asymptomatic (6–8). Surgical carotid (...) in the mid 1980s, when a number of critical reports suggested unaccept- able rates of perioperative stroke or death (16–21), and a high rate of end- arterectomy performed for inappro- priateindications(22).Ratesofcarotid endarterectomy in the United States and Canada have again increased sincethepublicationoffavorable,well constructed clinical studies, beginning in 1991 with the North American Symptomatic Carotid Endarterectomy Trial (NASCET) (23,24). In 1996,130 000 carotid endarterectomies were

2009 Society of Interventional Radiology

177. Reporting Standards for Angioplasty and Stent-assisted Angioplasty for Intracranial Atherosclerosis

of endovascular treatment using angioplasty or stent-assisted angio- plasty for stenotic and occlusive intracranial atherosclerosis. SUMMARY OF REPORT: This article was written under the auspices of Joint Writing Group of the Technology Assessment Committee, Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery, Society of Interventional Radiology; Joint Section on Cerebrovascular Neurosurgery of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons and Congress of Neurological Surgeons; and the Section of Stroke (...) Medical, and served as a consul- tant to Concentric Medical. Dr Wechsler served as a consultant to Nuevelo, Inc, and Abbott Vascular. Dr Lavine received honoraria from Cordis Neurovascu- lar. Dr Rasmussen received honoraria from the Uni- versities of Minnesota and Pittsburgh, Microvention/ Terumo, ev3, Possis, Medical/Medrad, and Micrus, has an ownership interest in Chestnut Medical, and served as a consultant to Chestnut Medical. Published in Stroke. 2009;40(5):e348–e365

2009 Society of Interventional Radiology

178. 2011 ACCF/AHA/SCAI Guideline for Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: Executive Summary

Testing 2592 5.1.3. Platelet Function Testing 2592 5.2. Restenosis 2592 5.2.1. Exercise Testing 2592 5.2.2. Cardiac Rehabilitation 2592 6. Quality and Performance Considerations: Recommendations 2592 6.1. Quality and Performance 2592 6.2. Certification and Maintenance of Certification 2592 6.3. Operator and Institutional Competency and Volume 2592 References 2593 Appendix 1. Author Relationships With Industry and Other Entities (Relevant) 2605 Appendix 2. Reviewer Relationships With Industry and Other (...) , angioplasty, balloon angioplasty, clinical trial, coronary stenting, delayed angioplasty, meta-analysis, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, randomized controlled trial, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and angina, angina reduction, antiplatelet therapy, bare-metal stents (BMS), cardiac rehabilitation, chronic stable angina, complication, coronary bifurcation lesion, coronary calcified lesion, coronary chronic total occlusion, coronary ostial lesions, coronary stent (BMS and drug

2011 American Heart Association

179. Evaluation of the child with microcephaly

intelligent adolescents followed by pediatricians found 11 (0.6%) with severe microcephaly (<−3 SD). e3 Among a separate sample of 106 adolescents with mental retardation, the prevalence of severe microcephaly was 11%. What is the prevalence of developmental disability in individuals with microcephaly? Three Class I studies based on the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Collaborative Perinatal Project examined data on microcephaly. In an early report (n = 9,379), half of the children (...) , there is significant potential for rehabilitation. e9 The findings from these and other selected studies are summarized in appendix e-3. Conclusions. Microcephaly is commonly found in developmentally and cognitively impaired children. Children with microcephaly are at a higher risk for mental retardation and there is a correlation between the degree of microcephaly and the severity of cognitive impairment. Recommendation. Because children with microcephaly are at risk for developmental disability, physicians

2009 American Academy of Neurology

180. Assessment scales for disorders of consciousness: evidence-based recommendations for clinical practice and research

validity (including criterion validity), and/or prognostic validity data on a second-generation DOC behavioral assessment scale; (2) examined a cohort, case con- trol, or case series sample made up of persons with DOC resulting from traumatic brain injury, stroke, and/or other non- traumatic brain injury etiology with most age greater than or equalto18years;and(3)assessedthesampleineitheranacute care or a rehabilitation setting. Articles were excluded if peer review was not conducted, original data (...) . Inmostcasesauthorsarepermittedtoposttheirversionofthe article(e.g. inWordorTexform)totheirpersonalwebsiteor institutionalrepository. Authorsrequiringfurtherinformation regardingElsevier’sarchivingandmanuscriptpoliciesare encouragedtovisit: http://www.elsevier.com/copyrightAuthor's personal copy SPECIAL ARTICLE A Practice Parameter of the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine Assessment Scales for Disorders of Consciousness: Evidence- Based Recommendations for Clinical Practice and Research Report of the American Congress of Rehabilitation

2010 American Academy of Neurology

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