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381. Transitions of Care in Heart Failure Full Text available with Trip Pro

themes and included difficulty in being motivated to leave home; anxious- ness when short of breath; general anger and frustration; lack of control of life; depression; feeling unwell; fears of myo- cardial infarction or stroke; forgetting to take medications; family and friends not understanding the current situation; and coping with work around the home. 12 Prevalent themes in a mixed-methods study aimed at understanding nonadher- ence in HF included clinical constraints related to low blood (...) , MD; Eunyoung Lee, PhD, RN, FNP, ACNP, FAHA; Sara Paul, DNP, RN, FNP, CHFN, FAHA; Catherine J. Ryan, PhD, RN, APRN-CNS, CCRN, FAHA; Connie White-Williams, PhD, RN, FAHA; on behalf of the American Heart Association Complex Cardiovascular Patient and Family Care Committee of the Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing, Council on Clinical Cardiology, and Council on Quality of Care and Outcomes Research The American Heart Association makes every effort to avoid any actual or potential conflicts

2015 American Heart Association

382. Management of Acute ST Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction (STEMI) ? (3rd Edition)

present with atypical symptoms such as unexplained fatigue, shortness of breath, dizziness, lightheadedness, unexplained sweating and syncope. They may not necessarily have chest pain. Other important points to note in the history are the presence of: • Previous history of ischaemic heart disease, PCI or CABG. • Risk factors for atherosclerosis. • Symptoms suggestive of previous transient ischaemic attack (TIA) or other forms of vascular disease. Upon clinical suspicion of ACS, a 12-lead ECG should (...) • Risk of intracranial haemorrhage o History of intracranial bleed. o History of ischaemic stroke within 3 months. o Known structural cerebral vascular lesion (e.g. arteriovenous malformation). o Known intracranial neoplasm. • Risk of bleeding o Active bleeding or bleeding diathesis (excluding menses). o Significant head trauma within 3 months. o Suspected aortic dissection. Relative contraindications • Risk of intracranial haemorrhage o Severe uncontrolled hypertension on presentation (blood

2014 Ministry of Health, Malaysia

383. Management of Heart Failure  (3rd Edition)

, sweating, low volume pulse, decreasing urine output ** Flow Chart II From onset, evaluate to identify correctable/reversible lesions Special situations: Myocardial ischaemia / infarction: Treat accordingly Hypertension: Control BP quickly Valvular heart disease: Corrective surgery/balloon valvuloplasty Refer : • section 7.1 for drug details and table V for dosages • section 8.2 for guidelines for referral to tertiary cardiac centres Acute Heart Failure (HF) SBP = 100mmHg SBP = 100mmHg Improved Improved (...) anemia - peripartum cardiomyopathy - large A-V shunts - stress (Takotsubo) cardiomyopathy Patients with Chronic HF may occasionally develop acute decompensation. Factors that can contribute to this Acute HF are listed in Table IV,pg 23. The more important causes are: • Acute myocardial infarction/myocardial ischemia • Arrhythmias (e.g. atrial fibrillation) • Uncontrolled Blood Pressure • Infections (e.g. pneumonia) • Non-compliance to medications • Excessive fluid and salt intake • Anemia

2014 Ministry of Health, Malaysia

384. Dysphagia

neurological condition accompanying the oropharyngeal dysphagia, such as: ? Hemiparesis following an earlier cerebrovascular accident ? Ptosis of the eyelids and fatigability, suggesting myasthenia gravis ? Stiffness, tremors, and dysautonomia, suggesting Parkinson disease ? Other neurological diseases, including cervical dystonia and compression of the cranial nerves, such as hyperostosis or Arnold–Chiari deformity (hindbrain herniations) ? Specific deficits of the cranial nerves involved in swallowing (...) , degenerative neurologic diseases Rehabilitation through techniques facilitating oral intake The management of complications is of paramount importance. In this regard, identifying the risk of aspiration is a key element when treatment options are being considered. For patients who are undergoing active stroke rehabilitation, therapy for dysphagia should be provided to the extent tolerated. Simple remedies may be important—e.g., prosthetic teeth to fix dental problems, modifications to the texture

2014 World Gastroenterology Organisation

385. Standards of Practice for Superficial Femoral and Popliteal Artery Angioplasty and Stenting

Moderate claudication 3 IIb Severe claudication 4 III Rest pain 5 IV Ischemic ulcers of the digits of the foot (minor tissue loss) 6 IV Severe ischemic ulcers or gangrene (major tissue loss) CIRSE Standards of Practice 593 123Antiplatelet therapy is indicated for reduction of the risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, and death in all patients with symptomatic atherosclerotic disease of the lower extremities), including patients who have undergone open surgical or percutaneous revascularization or even (...) ’’ University of Rome, Rome, Italy 123 Cardiovasc Intervent Radiol (2014) 37:592–603 DOI 10.1007/s00270-014-0876-3Clinical Assessment Peripheral arterial disease affects almost 12 % of the general population and is responsible for substantial healthcare costs. PAD primarily results in a decreased functional capacity and deterioration in quality of life and is associated with an increased risk of limb amputation, myocardial infarction, stroke, and death [4, 5, 15]. Two- thirds to three-fourths of patients

2014 Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe

387. Heart Failure Management in Skilled Nursing Facilities Full Text available with Trip Pro

to coronary artery disease. Older people have an increased risk of ischemic heart disease, because aging is associated with endothelial dysfunction and progression of underlying coronary artery disease, as well as a decrease in capillary density and decreased coronary reserve, which can lead to insidious myocardial ischemia. In the Cardiovascular Health Study, the presence of coronary heart disease was associated with an 87% increased risk of HF despite the prevalence of hypertension being over twice (...) precipitating or contributing to HF exacerbations are outlined in . These precipitants may be particularly important for patients with HF who are admitted to a SNF for an unrelated problem. Table 2. Potential Causes of HF in Older Adults Hypertensive heart disease Hypertensive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy Coronary artery disease Acute myocardial infarction Chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy Age-related diastolic dysfunction Valvular heart disease Aortic stenosis or insufficiency Mitral stenosis or insufficiency

2015 American Heart Association

388. Diagnosis and Treatment of Overactive Bladder (Non-Neurogenic) in Adults: AUA/SUFU Guideline

nocturnal bladder capacity or both. In nocturnal polyuria, nocturnal voids are frequently normal or large volume as opposed to the small volume voids commonly observed in nocturia associated with OAB. Sleep disturbances, vascular and/or cardiac disease and other medical conditions are often associated with nocturnal polyuria. As such, it is often age-dependent, increasing in prevalence with aging and Introduction Overactive Bladder Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research (...) complicated OAB patients. These co-morbid conditions include neurologic diseases (i.e., stroke, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury), mobility deficits, medically complicated/uncontrolled diabetes, fecal motility disorders (fecal incontinence/ constipation), chronic pelvic pain, history of recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs), gross hematuria, prior pelvic/vaginal surgeries (incontinence/prolapse surgeries), pelvic cancer (bladder, colon, cervix, uterus, prostate) and pelvic radiation. The female

2014 Society of Urodynamics, Female Pelvic Medicine & Urogenital Reconstruction

389. Congenital Heart Disease in the Older Adult Full Text available with Trip Pro

and may require specialized mapping for ablation. Vascular complications include the development of pulmonary hypertension, aortic root dilation, aneurysm formation, and venous insufficiency. Importantly, with age, and in this older ACHD population, management will need to encompass acquired heart disease. In the general population, mortality rates for all cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease, and stroke are, respectively, 10, 9, and 13 times higher in people ≥65 years old than in those 45 (...) , poor ostial imaging on echocardiography, or computed tomography (CT) to assess the anatomy and physiology of proximal segment narrowing. The risk of coronary occlusion, ischemia, or arrhythmia should be recognized by the operator when these studies are undertaken. Coronary CTA has become the “gold standard” for assessment of anomalous coronary origin and course in the older adult. In experienced hands, it offers anatomy and coronary course assessment in a cross section of the coronary ostium

2015 American Heart Association

390. Current Science on Consumer Use of Mobile Health for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Full Text available with Trip Pro

Committee of the Council on Cardiometabolic Health, Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing, Council on Functional Genomics and Translational Biology, Council on Quality of Care and Outcomes Research, and Stroke Council Lora E. Burke , Jun Ma , Kristen M.J. Azar , Gary G. Bennett , Eric D. Peterson , Yaguang Zheng , William Riley , Janna Stephens , Svati H. Shah , Brian Suffoletto , Tanya N. Turan , Bonnie Spring , Julia Steinberger , and Charlene C. Quinn and on behalf of the American Heart (...) Association Publications Committee of the Council on Epidemiology and Prevention, Behavior Change Committee of the Council on Cardiometabolic Health, Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing, Council on Functional Genomics and Translational Biology, Council on Quality of Care and Outcomes Research, and Stroke Council Originally published 13 Aug 2015 Circulation. 2015;132:1157–1213 You are viewing the most recent version of this article. Previous versions: Although mortality for cardiovascular disease

2015 American Heart Association

391. Guidelines for the management of patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms Full Text available with Trip Pro

disease. Aneurysms found after presentation with stroke or transient ischemic attack and that have clearly defined intrasaccular thrombus proximal to the ischemic territory on imaging may warrant consideration for treatment, but a lack of prospective data makes it uncertain as to whether such treatment will reduce the risk of subsequent ischemia. Clinical Presentation: Recommendations Patients with an aSAH should undergo careful assessment for a coexistent UIA (Class I; Level of Evidence B) . Early (...) been identified include female sex, cigarette smoking, younger age, excessive alcohol consumption, aneurysm location, multiplicity of aneurysms, history of stroke, and history of transient ischemic attack. Recent findings indicate the propensity for growing aneurysms to rupture and indicate that risk factors for growth were initial aneurysm size, arterial branch–related aneurysms, hypertension, tobacco smoking, and female sex. More prospective studies with either imaging or biomarkers are needed

2015 American Academy of Neurology

392. Guidelines for the Management of Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage

is particularly high. CAA is an important cause of warfarin-associated lobar ICH in the elderly. The presence of microbleeds might increase the risk of ICH recurrence in warfarin users, although there are no prospective data. In a pooled analysis of ICH and ischemic stroke or transient isch- emic attack patients, microbleeds were more frequent in war- farin users with ICH than in nonwarfarin users (OR, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.6–4.4; P<0.001) but were not more frequent in warfarin users with ischemic stroke (...) resonance imaging; SBP, systolic blood pressure; and VKA, vitamin K antagonist. Downloaded from http://ahajournals.org by on March 27, 20192036 Stroke July 2015 Neuroimaging The abrupt onset of focal neurological symptoms is presumed to be vascular in origin until proven otherwise; however, it is impossible to know whether symptoms are caused by ischemia or hemorrhage on the basis of clinical characteristics alone. Vomiting, systolic BP (SBP) >220 mm Hg, severe headache, coma or decreased level

2015 Congress of Neurological Surgeons

393. Guidelines for the management of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage Full Text available with Trip Pro

). (Revised from the previous guideline) Prophylactic antiseizure medication is not recommended (Class III; Level of Evidence B ). (Unchanged from the previous guideline) Management of Medical Complications The frequency of medical complications after acute stroke is high, although there is substantially more information reported for ischemic stroke than ICH. In a trial of the safety and tolerability of NXY-059 (CHANT [Cerebral Hematoma and NXY Treatment]) in patients with spontaneous ICH, at least 1 (...) and by the members of the Stroke Council Scientific Oversight Committee and Stroke Council Leadership Committee. Results— Evidence-based guidelines are presented for the care of patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage. Topics focused on diagnosis, management of coagulopathy and blood pressure, prevention and control of secondary brain injury and intracranial pressure, the role of surgery, outcome prediction, rehabilitation, secondary prevention, and future considerations. Results of new phase 3 trials were

2015 American Academy of Neurology

394. ACS/ASCO Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline Full Text available with Trip Pro

patients if they are experiencing cognitive difficulties (LOE = 0); (b) should assess for reversible contributing factors of cognitive impairment and optimally treat when possible (LOE = IA); and (c) should refer patients with signs of cognitive impairment for neurocognitive assessment and rehabilitation, including group cognitive training if available (LOE = IA). Distress, depression, anxiety Recommendation 3.5: It is recommended that primary care clinicians (a) should assess patients for distress (...) that primary care clinicians (a) should assess for musculoskeletal symptoms, including pain, by asking patients about their symptoms at each clinical encounter (LOE = 0); and (b) should offer one or more of the following interventions based on clinical indication: acupuncture, physical activity, and referral for physical therapy or rehabilitation (LOE = III). Pain and neuropathy Recommendation 3.9: It is recommended that primary care clinicians (a) should assess for pain and contributing factors for pain

2015 American Society of Clinical Oncology Guidelines

395. Evaluation, diagnosis, and management of congenital muscular dystrophy

of Childhood Section (C.G.B.), Neurogenetics Branch, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD; Cure Congenital Muscular Dystrophy (Cure CMD) (A.R.), Olathe, KS; Department of Emergency Medicine (A.R.), Kaiser Permanente South Bay Medical Center, Harbor City, CA; Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation (J.H.), University of Michigan, Ann Arbor; Departments of Neurology and Pediatrics (C.H.W.), School of Medicine, Stanford University, CA (...) (C.G.B.), Neurogenetics Branch, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD; Cure Congenital Muscular Dystrophy (Cure CMD) (A.R.), Olathe, KS; Department of Emergency Medicine (A.R.), Kaiser Permanente South Bay Medical Center, Harbor City, CA; Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation (J.H.), University of Michigan, Ann Arbor; Departments of Neurology and Pediatrics (C.H.W.), School of Medicine, Stanford University, CA; Department

2015 American Academy of Neurology

396. The Non-Surgical Management of Hip & Knee Osteoarthritis (OA)

the degree of weight-bearing support they should apply to their ambulation aids. Furthermore, gait pattern(s) required for cane ambulation also decreases the efficiency of walking. Walking aids are associated with a large number of accidents (frequently falls) requiring urgent medical treatment. Thus, the patient's functional requirements should be matched with the proper walking aid and the clinician must consider whether the patient has sufficient strength, exercise tolerance, balance, coordination

2014 VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guidelines

397. Diagnosis and Treatment of Non-Neurogenic Overactive Bladder (OAB) in Adults: AUA/SUFU Guideline

the period of sleep, which is age-dependent with 20% for younger individuals and 33% for elderly individuals), 28 low nocturnal bladder capacity or both. In nocturnal polyuria, nocturnal voids are frequently normal or large volume as opposed to the small volume voids commonly observed in nocturia associated with OAB. Sleep disturbances, vascular and/or cardiac disease and other medical conditions are often associated with nocturnal polyuria. As such, it is often age-dependent, increasing in prevalence (...) . Patients may avoid certain activities (e.g., travel, situations that do not allow easy access to a toilet) because of their bladder symptoms. Co-morbid conditions should be completely elicited as these conditions may directly impact bladder function. Patients with co-morbid conditions and OAB symptoms would be considered complicated OAB patients. These co-morbid conditions include neurologic diseases (i.e., stroke, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury), mobility deficits, medically complicated

2014 American Urological Association

398. Diagnosis and Treatment Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome

for endometriosis Exclusion criteria: bladder cancer, urethral diverticulum, spinal cord injury, stroke, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, spina bifida, cyclophosphamide treatment, radiation treatment to pelvic area, tuberculosis affecting the bladder, uterine cancer, ovarian cancer, vaginal cancer, genital herpes, pregnancy Berry et al. (2011) used the questionnaire to determine prevalence of IC/BPS among adult females in the US. 13 This study yielded prevalence estimates of from 2.7% to 6.53

2014 American Urological Association

399. Eligibility and Disqualification Recommendations for Competitive Athletes With Cardiovascular Abnormalities: Task Force 15: Legal Aspects of Medical Eligibility and Disqualification Recommendations

and Disqualification Recommendations A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology , JD, Chair , MD, FAHA, MACC , and MD, FACC JDon behalf of the American Heart Association Electrocardiography and Arrhythmias Committee of the Council on Clinical Cardiology, Council on Cardiovascular Disease in the Young, Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing, Council on Functional Genomics and Translational Biology, and the American College of Cardiology Matthew J. Mitten (...) , Douglas P. Zipes , Barry J. Maron , and William J. Bryant and on behalf of the American Heart Association Electrocardiography and Arrhythmias Committee of the Council on Clinical Cardiology, Council on Cardiovascular Disease in the Young, Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing, Council on Functional Genomics and Translational Biology, and the American College of Cardiology Originally published 2 Nov 2015 Circulation. 2015;132:e346–e349 You are viewing the most recent version of this article

2015 American Heart Association

400. Eligibility and Disqualification Recommendations for Competitive Athletes With Cardiovascular Abnormalities: Task Force 10: The Cardiac Channelopathies Full Text available with Trip Pro

, FAHA, MACC , and MD, FAHA, FACC MD, FACCon behalf of the American Heart Association Electrocardiography and Arrhythmias Committee of the Council on Clinical Cardiology, Council on Cardiovascular Disease in the Young, Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing, Council on Functional Genomics and Translational Biology, and the American College of Cardiology Michael J. Ackerman , Douglas P. Zipes , Richard J. Kovacs , and Barry J. Maron and on behalf of the American Heart Association (...) Electrocardiography and Arrhythmias Committee of the Council on Clinical Cardiology, Council on Cardiovascular Disease in the Young, Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing, Council on Functional Genomics and Translational Biology, and the American College of Cardiology Originally published 2 Nov 2015 Circulation. 2015;132:e326–e329 You are viewing the most recent version of this article. Previous versions: Introduction The cardiac channelopathies are a collection of primary, genetically mediated heart

2015 American Heart Association

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