How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

679 results for

stroke rehabilitation

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

321. Eligibility and Disqualification Recommendations for Competitive Athletes With Cardiovascular Abnormalities: Task Force 15: Legal Aspects of Medical Eligibility and Disqualification Recommendations

and Disqualification Recommendations A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology , JD, Chair , MD, FAHA, MACC , and MD, FACC JDon behalf of the American Heart Association Electrocardiography and Arrhythmias Committee of the Council on Clinical Cardiology, Council on Cardiovascular Disease in the Young, Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing, Council on Functional Genomics and Translational Biology, and the American College of Cardiology Matthew J. Mitten (...) , Douglas P. Zipes , Barry J. Maron , and William J. Bryant and on behalf of the American Heart Association Electrocardiography and Arrhythmias Committee of the Council on Clinical Cardiology, Council on Cardiovascular Disease in the Young, Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing, Council on Functional Genomics and Translational Biology, and the American College of Cardiology Originally published 2 Nov 2015 Circulation. 2015;132:e346–e349 You are viewing the most recent version of this article

2015 American Heart Association

322. Eligibility and Disqualification Recommendations for Competitive Athletes With Cardiovascular Abnormalities: Task Force 10: The Cardiac Channelopathies Full Text available with Trip Pro

, FAHA, MACC , and MD, FAHA, FACC MD, FACCon behalf of the American Heart Association Electrocardiography and Arrhythmias Committee of the Council on Clinical Cardiology, Council on Cardiovascular Disease in the Young, Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing, Council on Functional Genomics and Translational Biology, and the American College of Cardiology Michael J. Ackerman , Douglas P. Zipes , Richard J. Kovacs , and Barry J. Maron and on behalf of the American Heart Association (...) Electrocardiography and Arrhythmias Committee of the Council on Clinical Cardiology, Council on Cardiovascular Disease in the Young, Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing, Council on Functional Genomics and Translational Biology, and the American College of Cardiology Originally published 2 Nov 2015 Circulation. 2015;132:e326–e329 You are viewing the most recent version of this article. Previous versions: Introduction The cardiac channelopathies are a collection of primary, genetically mediated heart

2015 American Heart Association

323. Eligibility and Disqualification Recommendations for Competitive Athletes With Cardiovascular Abnormalities: Task Force 9: Arrhythmias and Conduction Defects

have survived a cardiac arrest caused by ventricular fibrillation or VT or who have had documented symptomatic rapid VT associated with a defined reversible abnormality (eg, resolved acute myocarditis or a controllable electrolyte abnormality) may be considered for reinstitution of participation after reevaluation at 3 months (Class I; Level of Evidence C) . Syncope Syncope is a transient loss of consciousness caused by transient global cerebral hypoperfusion characterized by rapid onset, short (...) duration, and spontaneous complete recovery. Syncope in the athlete can result from relatively benign causes such as cerebral hypoperfusion because of physiology similar to that found with the common faint or neurally mediated syncope. Less frequently, syncope results from serious cardiovascular conditions that result in transient loss of cerebral blood flow because of an obstruction or arrhythmias associated with underlying structural heart disease. Primary electrical disorders can result in syncope

2015 American Heart Association

324. Botulinum neurotoxin for the treatment of blepharospasm, cervical dystonia, adult spasticity, and headache

of Neurology and Neurological Sciences (Y.T.S.), Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA; and Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (S.A.Y.), University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. Mark Hallett From the Department of Neurology (D.M.S., M.W.G.), Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY; Human Motor Control Section (M.H.), National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (B.P.K.), National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD; Department of Neurology (E.J.A.), Bronson Neuroscience (...) (M.N.), Klinikum Augsburg, Germany; Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences (Y.T.S.), Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA; and Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (S.A.Y.), University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. Mark W. Green From the Department of Neurology (D.M.S., M.W.G.), Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY; Human Motor Control Section (M.H.), National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (B.P.K.), National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD

2016 American Academy of Neurology

325. Sex Differences in the Cardiovascular Consequences of Diabetes Mellitus Full Text available with Trip Pro

the myocardial infarction. In a Finnish cohort study, the presence of DM reduced the so-called female advantage for CVD risk; indeed, mortality from CHD was 3 times higher in women compared with men with DM. Similar findings were observed in the NHANES cohort; ischemic heart disease mortality increased ≈11% from the 1971 to 1975 cohort followed up through 1986 compared with the 1982 to 1984 cohort followed up through 1992. Biologically, a more adverse cardiovascular risk profile is observed in women with DM (...) so that treatment for both sexes will be improved. Sex Differences in the Risk of Stroke Among Individuals With DM DM is widely recognized as a risk factor for stroke in both women and men. On a population level, ≈26.3% of strokes are attributable to DM. In terms of the different types of stroke, a >2-fold risk for ischemic stroke has been observed consistently among those with DM, with an ≈50% increased risk of hemorrhagic stroke. DM has been particularly associated with increased risk

2015 American Heart Association

326. Eligibility and Disqualification Recommendations for Competitive Athletes With Cardiovascular Abnormalities: Preamble, Principles, and General Considerations

, FACC, Co-Chair , and MD, FAHA, MACC, Co-Chair MD, FAHA, FACC, Co-Chairon behalf of the American Heart Association Electrocardiography and Arrhythmias Committee of the Council on Clinical Cardiology, Council on Cardiovascular Disease in the Young, Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing, Council on Functional Genomics and Translational Biology, and the American College of Cardiology Barry J. Maron , Douglas P. Zipes , and Richard J. Kovacs and on behalf of the American Heart Association (...) Electrocardiography and Arrhythmias Committee of the Council on Clinical Cardiology, Council on Cardiovascular Disease in the Young, Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing, Council on Functional Genomics and Translational Biology, and the American College of Cardiology Originally published 2 Nov 2015 Circulation. 2015;132:e256–e261 You are viewing the most recent version of this article. Previous versions: Introduction This document addresses medical issues related to trained athletes with cardiovascular

2015 American Heart Association

327. 2015 ACC/AHA Focused Update of Secondary Prevention Lipid Performance Measures

angina, coronary (including PCI) or other arterial revascularization, stroke, transient ischemic attack, or PAD. Although this patient population seems heterogeneous, it encompasses a variety of patients who all share presumed atherosclerosis as a common pathophysiology. Atherosclerosis is a chronic diffuse disease involving a myriad of arterial beds with intermittent acute clinical manifestations, predominantly occurring as a result of superimposed thrombosis, plaque progression, spasm, embolism (...) in coronary death or nonfatal MI, coronary revascularization, and ischemic stroke. The investigators also found no significant effects observed on deaths due to cancer or other nonvascular causes or on cancer incidence, even at low LDL-C concentrations. The aforementioned report was a meta-analysis of RCTs. Concerns about the quality and quantity of safety reporting in RCTs have been raised previously, and many researchers find the reporting of risks in RCTs to be largely inadequate. Data from RCTs should

2015 American Heart Association

328. 2014 ACC/AHA Guideline on Perioperative Cardiovascular Evaluation and Management of Patients Undergoing Noncardiac Surgery

with stable ischemic heart disease ACC/AHA/AATS/PCNA/ SCAI/STS 2012 2014 Focused update incorporated into the 2007 guidelines for the management of patients with unstable angina/non–ST-elevation myocardial infarction ACC/AHA 2012 Red blood cell transfusion AABB 2012 Management of patients with peripheral artery disease: focused update and guideline ACC/AHA 2011 2006 Diagnosis and treatment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy ACC/AHA 2011 Coronary artery bypass graft surgery ACC/AHA 2011 Percutaneous coronary (...) noncardiac surgery in the absence of a coronary intervention. A recent MI, defined as having occurred within 6 months of noncardiac surgery, was also found to be an independent risk factor for perioperative stroke, which was associated with an 8-fold increase in the perioperative mortality rate. A patient’s age is an important consideration, given that adults (those ≥55 years of age) have a growing prevalence of cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, and diabetes mellitus, which increase

2014 American Heart Association

329. Supervision of Exercise Testing by Nonphysicians Full Text available with Trip Pro

, stroke, transient ischemic attack, nonsustained ventricular tachycardia, syncope, implantable cardioverter-defibrillator discharges requiring hospitalization, and vasovagal episodes, resulting in considerable variation in the associated test morbidity and total complications. Table 3. Complication Rates of Exercise Testing (1971–2012) Reference Year Tests, n Morbidity Rate, n per 1000 Mortality Rate, n per 1000 Total Complications, n per 1000 Physician Supervised? Rochmis and Blackburn 1971 ≈170 000 (...) and Stroke Nursing Jonathan Myers , Daniel E. Forman , Gary J. Balady , Barry A. Franklin , Jane Nelson-Worel , Billie-Jean Martin , William G. Herbert , Marco Guazzi , and Ross Arena and on behalf of the American Heart Association Subcommittee on Exercise, Cardiac Rehabilitation, and Prevention of the Council on Clinical Cardiology, Council on Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health, Council on Epidemiology and Prevention, and Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing Originally published 18 Aug 2014

2014 American Heart Association

330. ACC/AHA/AACVPR/AAFP/ANA Concepts for Clinician?Patient Shared Accountability in Performance Measures Full Text available with Trip Pro

, APN, FAHA, FAAN , MD, MS, FAAFP , MD, MAACVPR, FACC , MD, MSPH, FACC, FAHA , and MD, FACS MBA Eric D. Peterson *ACC/AHA Representative. † National Committee for Quality Assurance Representative. ‡ American Society of Health System Pharmacists Representative. § ACC/AHA Task Force on Performance Measures Liaison. ‖ American Nurses Association Representative. ¶ American Academy of Family Physicians Representative. # American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation Representative (...) Rehabilitation Representative. ** American Medical Association–Physician Consortium for Performance Improvement Representative. †† Mended Hearts Representative. , Mary Barton *ACC/AHA Representative. † National Committee for Quality Assurance Representative. ‡ American Society of Health System Pharmacists Representative. § ACC/AHA Task Force on Performance Measures Liaison. ‖ American Nurses Association Representative. ¶ American Academy of Family Physicians Representative. # American Association

2014 American Heart Association

331. Adults With Congenital Heart Disease

( 5 min) rather than immediately after effort (e.g., walking into a clinic examination room). • Meticulous intravenous care to avoid air or particulate matter, which may include use of air/particulate filters on all intravenous access lines, when feasible, and careful de-airing of all lines. • Cerebral imaging for any new headache or neurologic sign to assess for possible cerebral abscess, hemorrhage, or stroke. • Measurement of serum uric acid and treatment with allopurinol in a patient (...) , medical therapy, myocardial infarction, noncardiac surgery, patent ductus arteriosus, perioperative care, physical activity, postoperative complications, pregnancy, preoperative assessment, psychosocial, pulmonary arterial hypertension, hypoplastic left heart syndrome, pulmonary regurgitation, pulmonary stenosis, pulmonary valve replacement, right heart obstruction, right ventricle to pulmonary artery conduit, single ventricle, supravalvular pulmonary stenosis, surgical therapy, tachyarrhythmia

2018 American College of Cardiology

332. Cardiovascular Disease: Secondary Prevention

with atorvastatin, for secondary prevention. Previously, rosuvastatin was non-formulary and was a second-line option for secondary prevention. Annual LDL monitoring is no longer required. Annual LDL monitoring was recommended for all patients on a statin. Non-fasting lipid panel is now the preferred cholesterol test. Fasting lipoprotein panel or direct LDL cholesterol were the preferred cholesterol tests. Updated blood pressure targets: • 50%. • Cerebrovascular disease, such as transient ischemic attack (...) , ischemic stroke, and carotid artery stenosis > 50%. • Peripheral artery disease, such as claudication. • Aortic atherosclerotic disease, such as abdominal aortic aneurysm and descending thoracic aneurysm. Primary prevention refers to the effort to prevent or delay the onset of ASCVD. Secondary prevention refers to the effort to treat known, clinically significant ASCVD, and to prevent or delay the onset of disease manifestations. Target Population The target population for secondary prevention of ASCVD

2018 Kaiser Permanente Clinical Guidelines

333. Cardiovascular Disease: Primary Prevention

the preferred cholesterol tests. Updated blood pressure targets: • 190 mg/dL, or diabetes. • Aspirin not recommended for patients with 190 mg/dL. • Statins not recommended for patients with 50%. • Cerebrovascular disease, such as transient ischemic attack, ischemic stroke, and carotid artery stenosis > 50%. • Peripheral artery disease, such as claudication. • Aortic atherosclerotic disease, such as abdominal aortic aneurysm and descending thoracic aneurysm. Primary prevention refers to the effort to prevent (...) participants based on an elevated LDL-C level, a diabetes diagnosis, or at least one CVD risk factor. The pooled results of the trials showed that the use of low- or moderate-dose statins was associated with a reduced risk of all- cause mortality (RR 0.86; 95% CI, 0.80–0.93), cardiovascular mortality (RR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.54–0.88), ischemic stroke (RR 0.71; 95% CI, 0.62–0.82), heart attack (RR 0.64; 95% CI, 0.57–0.71), and a composite cardiovascular outcome (RR 0.70; 95% CI, 0.63–0.78).The relative risk

2018 Kaiser Permanente Clinical Guidelines

334. Oral Health Care for the Pregnant Adolescent

significant morbidity (e.g., hemorrhagic stroke) or mortality. 17 The diet of the pregnant adolescent can affect the health of the child. A healthy diet is necessary to provide adequate amounts of nutrients to the mother-to-be and the unborn child. Recommended dietary allowances during pregnancy and lactation are tabulated as absolute figures rather than additions to the basic allowances. 18 Nutrients of particular importance include folate (folic acid), calcium, magnesium, zinc, and vitamins K, C, B-6 (...) affected more than posterior teeth. 45 These findings are exacerbated by poor plaque control and mouth breathing. 46 From a periodontal perspective, the effects of hormonal levels on the gingival status of pregnant women may be accompanied by increased levels of progesterone and estrogen which contribute to increased vascularity, permeability, and possible tissue edema. 47,48 Evidence shows a relationship of periodontal disease and gestational AMERICAN ACADEMY OF PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY RECOMMENDATIONS

2016 American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry

335. Professional Practice Guidelines for Integrating the Role of Work and Career Into Psychological Practice

, Herbig, Dragano and Angerer (2013) concluded that long-term unemployment, defined as having been out of work for more than one year, is both a cause and effect of physical and mental illness. They found that long-term unemployed individuals were twice as likely to have a mental illness, had higher risks of heart attack and stroke, and had higher mortality rates than employed individuals. Interestingly, most of the current research examining long-term unemployment is being completed with samples (...) of rehabilitation psychology (Szymanski, 2000). This becomes a particular concern for individuals with disabling conditions as the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (2015) reported that, in 2014, Guidelines for Integrating the Role of Work and Career Into Professional Psychology Practice only 17.1 percent of persons with a disability were employed as compared to 64.6 percent for persons without a disability. Across all educational attainment groups, unemployment rates were higher for persons with a disability

2015 American Psychological Association

336. CCF/SCAI/STS/AATS/AHA/ASNC/HFSA/SCCT 2012 Appropriate Use Criteria for Coronary Revascularization Focused Update

ischemic symptoms, or no unstable ventricular arrhythmias at time of presentation ? Depressed LVEF ? Three-vessel CAD ? Elective/semielective revascularization A (8) 7. ? STEMI with successful treatment of the culprit artery by primary PCI or ?brinolysis ? Asymptomatic; no HF, no evidence of recurrent or provokable ischemia, or no unstable ventricular arrhythmias during index hospitalization ? Normal LVEF ? Revascularization of a non-infarct-related artery during index hospitalization I (2) 8. ? STEMI (...) and at a normal pace. Class IV: Inability to carry on any physical activity without discomfort—anginal symptoms may be pres- ent at rest. High-Risk Features for Short-Term Risk of Death or Nonfatal MI for UA/NSTEMI (16) At least 1 of the following: • History—accelerating tempo of ischemic symptoms in preceding 48 hours • Character of pain—prolonged ongoing (greater than 20 minutes) rest pain • Clinical ?ndings X Pulmonary edema, most likely due to ischemia X New or worsening mitral regurgitation murmur X S 3

2012 Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions

337. 2012 ACCF/AHA/ACP/AATS/PCNA/SCAI/STS Guideline for the Diagnosis and Management of Patients With Stable Ischemic Heart Disease: Executive Summary

to: accuracy, angina, asymptomatic patients, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), cardiac rehabilitation, chest pain, chronic angina, chronic coronary occlusions, chronic ischemic heart disease (IHD), chronic total occlusion, connective tissue disease, coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) versus medical therapy, coronary artery disease (CAD) and exercise, coro- nary calcium scanning, cardiac/coronary computed tomogra- phy angiography (CCTA), CMR angiography, CMR imag- ing, coronary stenosis, death, depression (...) myocardial infarction, history of heart failure, and prior aspirin use. †For comparative effectiveness recommendations (Class I and IIa; Level of Evidence A and B only), studies that support the use of comparator verbs should involve direct comparisons of the treatments or strategies being evaluated. 2567 JACC Vol. 60, No. 24, 2012 Fihn et al. December 18, 2012:2564–603 Stable Ischemic Heart Disease: Executive Summary Downloaded From: http://content.onlinejacc.org/ on 03/08/2013quality and availability

2012 Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions

338. Geriatric Trauma Management

- Generation Antipsychotics on page 15 for full list) Increased risk of cerebrovascular accident (stroke) and mortality in persons with dementia Avoid use for behavioral problems of dementia unless nonpharmacologic options have failed and patient is threat to self or others Moderate Strong Thioridazine Mesoridazine Highly anticholinergic and greater risk of QT- interval prolongation Avoid Moderate Strong Barbiturates z Amobarbital* z Butabarbital* z Butalbital z Mephobarbital* z Pentobarbital* z (...) emphasize the following: z Determine medications that affect initial evaluation and care.  Coumadin  Clopidogrel  Other anticoagulants  ASA  Beta blockers  ACE inhibitors z Consider common, acute, nontraumatic events that could complicate the patient’s presentation, including:  Acute coronary syndrome (EKG)  Hypovolemia/dehydration  Urinary tract infection  Pneumonia  Acute renal failure  Cerebrovascular event  Syncope z Lab assessment: Hypoperfusion is often underappreciated in the elderly

2013 American College of Surgeons

339. 2012 KDIGO Clinical Practice Guideline for the Evaluation and Management of CKD

) 4.1.2: We recommend that the level of care for ischemic heart disease offered to people with CKD should not be prejudiced by their CKD. (1A) 4.1.3: We suggest that adults with CKD at risk for atherosclerotic events be offered treatment with antiplatelet agents unlessthereisanincreasedbleedingriskthatneedstobebalancedagainstthepossiblecardiovascularbene?ts.(2B) 4.1.4: WesuggestthatthelevelofcareforheartfailureofferedtopeoplewithCKDshouldbethesameasisofferedto those without CKD. (2A) 4.1.5: In people (...) . (2B) 5.2.2: The multidisciplinary team should include or have access to dietary counseling, education and counseling about different RRT modalities, transplant options, vascular access surgery, and ethical, psychological, and social care. (Not Graded) 5.3: TIMING THE INITIATION OF RRT 5.3.1: We suggest that dialysis be initiated when one or more of the following are present: symptoms or signs attributable to kidney failure (serositis, acid-base or electrolyte abnormalities, pruritus); inability

2012 National Kidney Foundation

340. KDOQI US Commentary on the 2012 KDIGO Clinical Practice Guideline for Management of Blood Pressure in CKD

) was a CV and renal outcomes trial in which the direct renin inhibitor aliskiren or placebo was added to RAS-blocking therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes, CKD, and high CV risk. This double- blind placebo-controlled study of 8,561 participants had a primary end point of time to ?rst occurrence of CV death, resuscitated cardiac arrest, nonfatal myocar- dial infarction, nonfatal stroke, unplanned hospitaliza- tion for heart failure, onset of end-stage renal disease, or doubling of serum creatinine (...) Hg. An updated stan- dards of care document released by the American Diabetes Association in January 2013 recommended treating all patients with diabetes and hypertension to a goal of140/80 mm Hg regardless of the presence of CKD, with the caveat that a lower systolic target, such as130 mm Hg, may be appropriate for those with longer life expectancy or at higher risk for stroke. 18 Both guidelines recommend a goal for sys- tolic blood pressure that is concordant with KDIGO. Given that systolic

2012 National Kidney Foundation

Guidelines

Guidelines – filter by country