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301. Evidence-Based Guideline: Evaluation, Diagnosis, and Management of Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

) Department of Neurology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (4) Departments of Pediatrics and Neurology & Neurotherapeutics, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, and Children’s Medical Center, Dallas, TX (5) Division of Critical Care Medicine, Boston Children’s Hospital, and Department of Anaesthesia, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (6) Neuromuscular and Neurogenetic Disorders of Childhood Section, Neurogenetics Branch, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (...) , National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (7) Cure Congenital Muscular Dystrophy (Cure CMD), Olathe, KS, and Department of Emergency Medicine, Kaiser Permanente South Bay Medical Center, Harbor City, CA (8) Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (9) Departments of Neurology and Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (10) Department of Neurology, Driscoll Children’s Hospital, Corpus Christi, TX (11) Murdoch Childrens Research

2013 American Association of Neuromuscular & Electrodiagnostic Medicine

302. Evidence-based Guideline: Evaluation and managment of concussion in sports

(K.G.), University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Neurology and Neurophysiology Associates, PC (S.M.), Philadelphia, PA; Neurological Surgery (G.M.), UCSF Medical Center, San Francisco, CA; Department of Family Medicine (D.B.M.), Indiana University Center for Sports Medicine, Indianapolis; Department of Neurology (D.J.T.), Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA; and Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (R.Z.), Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Massachusetts General (...) Traumatic Brain Injury Guideline Workgroup; has received funding for travel for invited lectures on traumatic brain injury (TBI)/concussion; has received royalties from Blackwell Publishing for Neurological Differential Diagnosis;has received honoraria for invited lectures on TBI/concussion; has received research support from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke/NIH, University of California, Department of Defense (DOD), NFL Charities, Thrasher Research Foundation, Today’s

2013 American Epilepsy Society

303. Shoulder Pain and Mobility Deficits: Adhesive Capsulitis

, secondary adhesive capsulitis or frozen shoulder is defined by a relationship between a disease or pathology with 3 subcategories: sys- temic, extrinsic, and intrinsic. Systemic secondary adhesive capsulitis includes those patients with a history of diabetes mellitus and thyroid disease. Extrinsic secondary adhesive capsulitis includes patients whose pathology is not directly related to the shoulder, yet it results in a painful and stiff shoulder, such as with a cerebral vascular accident, intra (...) of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy. CLASSIFICATION The terms adhesive capsulitis, frozen shoulder, and periar- thritis have been used for patients with shoulder pain and mobility deficits. Adhesive capsulitis will be used in these guidelines to describe both primary idiopathic adhesive cap- sulitis and secondary adhesive capsulitis related to systemic disease, such as diabetes mellitus and thyroid disorders, as well as extrinsic or intrinsic factors, including cerebral vas- cular accident, proximal

2013 The Orthopaedic Section of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA), Inc.

304. Sleep Apnea, Sleepiness, and Driving Risk: An Official ATS Clinical Practice Guideline

on “driving risk” assessments in “aging,” “psychiatric illness,” “epilepsy,” “car- diovasculardisease,”“diabetes,”“Alzheimer’sdisease,”“hyperten- sion,” “neurodegenerative disease,” “stroke,” “neurocognition,” and “rehabilitation medicine” was performed and referenced to the degree applicable to driving risks in chronic disease. Fourquestionsrequiredtheselectionofonecourseofaction fromamongseveralreasonableoptionsorapproaches.Eachwas answered by a recommendation that was supported by a prag- matic (...) ;recommendationsansweringsuchquestionsarecon- sideredbest-practicerecommendations(i.e.,“motherhoodstate- ments”), which do not require a systematic review of the literatureortheGRADEapproach.Insuchcases,acomprehen- sive but nonsystematic literature review was conducted. Key words for the literature search included “driving risk,” “sleep apnea,” “motor vehicle/automobile accidents/crashes,” “legal issues,” and “physician liability.” Subsearches were per- formed to assess the nonsleep literature. The following sources were searched

2013 American Thoracic Society

305. Bell's palsy

for Bell’s palsy has been identified. Other conditions may cause facial paralysis, including stroke, brain tumors, tumors of the parotid gland or infratemporal fossa, cancer involving the facial nerve, and systemic and infectious diseases, including zoster, sarcoidosis, and Lyme disease. , - Bell’s palsy is typically self-limited. Bell’s palsy may occur in men, women, and children but is more common in those 15 to 45 years old; those with diabetes, upper respiratory ailments, or compromised immune (...) , warrant careful management, but treatment results can be favorable. Long term, the disfigurement of the face due to incomplete recovery of the facial nerve can have devastating effects on psychological well-being and quality of life. With diminished facial movement and marked facial asymmetry, patients with facial paralysis can have impaired interpersonal relationships and may experience profound social distress, depression, and social alienation. There are a number of rehabilitative procedures

2013 American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

306. Deep Venous Thrombosis and Thromboembolism in Patients With Cervical Spinal Cord Injuries

are not recommended as a routine prophylactic measure, but are recommended for select patients who fail anticoagulation or who are not candidates for anticoagulation and/or mechanical devices. Diagnosis: Level III Duplex Doppler ultrasound, impedance plethysmography, venous occlusion plethysmography, venography, and the clinical examination are recommended for use as diagnostic tests for DVT in the spinal cord injured population. RATIONALE DVT and PE collectively considered as VTE are problems frequently (...) incidence of DVT in their control group compared to other series because of the aggressive physical therapy paradigm employed in their patients. Although they performed screening venous occlusion plethysmography (VOP) with confirmatory venography weekly, the incidence of DVT was only 7% in both groups, suggesting that the treatments were equivalent in their study. This low incidence of DVT is substantially lower than that reported by 2 separate groups of investigators a decade later. , In 1992, Kulkarni

2013 Congress of Neurological Surgeons

307. Clinical Assessment Following Acute Cervical Spinal Cord Injury Full Text available with Trip Pro

in Turkey . Scand J Rehabil Med . 2000 ; 32 ( 2 ): 87 – 92 . 30. Mahoney F , Barthel DW Functional evaluation: the Barthel Index . Md State Med J . 1965 ; 14 : 61 – 65 . 31. Shah S , Vanclay F , Cooper B Improving the sensitivity of the Barthel Index for stroke rehabilitation . J Clin Epidemiol . 1989 ; 42 ( 8 ): 703 – 709 . 32. Anderson K , Aito S , Atkins M , et al. Functional recovery measures for spinal cord injury: an evidence-based review for clinical practice and research . J Spinal Cord Med (...) .They used item response theory methods to determine the value of the use of ASIA motor score/subscores to predict motor Functional Independence Measure (FIM) instrument scores among a database of 4338 SCI patients discharged from inpatient rehabilitation between 1994 and 2003. They concluded that functional impairment following SCI is more accurately described by the use of separate upper- and lower-extremity ASIA motor scores rather than a single, total ASIA motor score. Similarly, in 2006, Graves et

2013 Congress of Neurological Surgeons

308. Evaluation and management of concussion in sports

, GA; and Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (R.Z.), Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Cambridge. Jeffrey S. Kutcher From the Division of Pediatric Neurology (C.C.G.), Mattel Children's Hospital, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA; Department of Neurology (J.S.K.), University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor; Departments of Pediatrics and Neurology (S.A.), Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA (...) ; Neurology and Neurophysiology Associates, PC (S.M.), Philadelphia, PA; Neurological Surgery (G.M.), UCSF Medical Center, San Francisco, CA; Department of Family Medicine (D.B.M.), Indiana University Center for Sports Medicine, Indianapolis; Department of Neurology (D.J.T.), Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA; and Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (R.Z.), Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Cambridge. Stephen Ashwal

2013 American Academy of Neurology

309. Secondary Prevention After Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery Full Text available with Trip Pro

Aspirin First discovered in 1897, aspirin irreversibly inhibits platelet cyclooxygenase-1. By decreasing thromboxane A2 production, aspirin prevents platelet aggregation, reducing the risk of stroke, myocardial infarction (MI), and vascular death in patients with ischemic heart disease. , Over 30 years of experience has accrued with the use of aspirin after cardiac surgery, and essentially all patients undergoing CABG are candidates for long-term aspirin therapy. Aspirin inhibition of platelet (...) of clinical benefit, and a small increase in ischemic stroke was noted in the niacin group. Presented in 2013, the Treatment of HDL to Reduce the Incidence of Vascular Events (HPS2-THRIVE) trial yielded similarly disappointing results for niacin. In this trial, 25 673 patients with well-controlled LDL levels were randomized to extended-release niacin plus an antiflushing agent (laropiprant) or placebo. Niacin increased HDL by 14% but failed to reduce the primary clinical end point (fatal or nonfatal MI

2015 American Heart Association

310. Long-term Cardiovascular Toxicity in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults Who Receive Cancer Therapy: Pathophysiology, Course, Monitoring, Management, Prevention, and Research Directions Full Text available with Trip Pro

). Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is highly expressed in solid tumors and is critical in modulating important cellular and vascular processes. Bevacizumab binds to and inhibits VEGF activity. This drug can promote arterial thrombotic activity, and in a few patients (3.8% in 1 study), it induces MI, angina, heart failure, stroke, and transient ischemic attacks (TIAs). These adverse effects were not dose related and occurred any time during treatment (median time, 3 months). The increased risk (...) The chemotherapeutic drugs noted below can cause ischemia in localized areas of the myocardium or a coronary artery syndrome. Antimetabolites (5-FU and Capecitabine). An ischemic syndrome (symptoms vary from angina pectoris to acute myocardial infarction [MI]) has been reported in up to 68% of adults after treatment with 5-FU. Signs of ischemia were observed within 2 to 5 days after patients began treatment and persisted for up to 48 hours after treatment. The risk of ischemia appears to be greater in patients

2013 American Heart Association

311. Prevention and Treatment of Thrombosis in Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease Full Text available with Trip Pro

, Christopher C. Erickson , Timothy F. Feltes , Elyse Foster , Kathleen Hinoki , Rebecca N. Ichord , Jacqueline Kreutzer , Brian W. McCrindle , Jane W. Newburger , Sarah Tabbutt , Jane L. Todd , Catherine L. Webb , and and on behalf of the American Heart Association Congenital Heart Defects Committee of the Council on Cardiovascular Disease in the Young, Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing, Council on Epidemiology and Prevention, and Stroke Council Originally published 13 Nov 2013 Circulation (...) .Propensity to Coagulopathy in Adults With CHD 2641 5.Consequences of Thrombosis in Patients With CHD 2641 6.Thrombotic Complications Associated With Pediatric Cardiovascular Surgery 2641 7.Incidence, Treatment, and Prevention of Stroke 2642 7.1.Incidence, Treatment, and Prevention of Stroke in Children With CHD and Acquired Heart Disease 2642 7.1.1.Incidence and Risk Factors 2642 7.1.1.1.Stroke After the Fontan Operation 2642 7.1.1.2.Stroke in Neonates and Children With CHD 2643 7.1.1.3.Hemorrhage

2013 American Heart Association

312. Diagnostic Criteria for Mild Cognitive Impairment in Parkinson?s Disease: Movement Disorder Society Task Force Guidelines

. Williams-Gray, MRCP, PhD 10 , Dag Aarsland, MD, PhD 11 , Jaime Kulisevsky, MD, PhD 12 , Maria C. Rodriguez-Oroz, MD, PhD 13 , David J. Burn, MD, FRCP 14 , Roger A. Barker, BSc, MBBS, MRCP, PhD 10 , and Murat Emre, MD 15 1 Division of Movement Disorders, Department of Neurology, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, USA; and Movement Disorders Program, Frazier Rehab Neuroscience Institute, Louisville, Kentucky, USA 2 Department of Neurological Sciences, Section of Parkinson Disease (...) (WTAR). These tests allow reasonably accurate estimates of verbal intelligence and are quite insensitive to cerebral deterioration in the absence of aphasia or marked dysarthria. Following the DSM-5 draft criteria for a mild neurocognitive disorder, 10 stronger evidence of cognitive decline comes from having previous test data on patients. Consequently, the task force advocates neuropsychological evaluation early in the course of PD to establish baseline cognitive abilities. 46 When such baseline

2012 European Academy of Neurology

313. Quality Improvement Guidelines for Endovascular Treatment of Traumatic Hemorrhage

Media, LLC and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE) 2012 Introduction This quality improvement guideline outlines the place of interventional radiology (IR) in trauma management and indicates how imaging and IR can be used in the context of hemorrhage in the severely injured patient, and when IR is appropriate and when it is contraindicated. Vascular injury may also lead to occlusion, and this will be discussed where relevant. There is no intention (...) the pro- portion of patients treated by NOM, these techniques should be promoted, provided suitable IR skills exist to perform embolization, stent grafting, or balloon occlusion to quickly control bleeding. (Recommendation C, level 3 evidence. This is equivalent to the evidence for surgical management; see Appendix 2.) Options for IR Involvement IR should be considered in terms of the techniques avail- able and how they may be used in a variety of clinical scenarios. In the context of trauma, vascular

2012 Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe

314. 2012 ACCF/AHA/ACR/SCAI/SIR/STS/SVM/SVN Key Data Elements and Definitions for Peripheral Atherosclerotic Vascular Disease

if the patient has a documented history of TIA consisting of a transient episode of neurological dysfunction caused by focal brain, spinal cord, or retinal ischemia without acute infarction. Note the following: ? Right retinal ? Right hemispheric ? Left retinal ? Left hemispheric ? Vertebrobasilar ? Unknown distribution Prior stroke Indicate whether the patient has a history of stroke, which is defined as an acute episode of neurological dysfunction caused by focal or global brain, spinal cord, or retinal (...) vascular injury as a result of hemorrhage or infarction. If present, record the type of stroke 26,27 : ? Ischemic ? Intracerebral hemorrhage ? Subarachnoid hemorrhage ? Unknown (Continued) Creager et al ACCF/AHA PAVD Data Standards 9 by guest on December 6, 2011 http://circ.ahajournals.org/ Downloaded from Table 1. Continued Element Name Definition If ischemic, list the most likely etiologies: ? Large-artery atherosclerosis of the extracranial vessels (eg, carotid) ? Large-artery atherosclerosis

2012 Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions

315. CCF/SCAI/STS/AATS/AHA/ASNC/HFSA/SCCT 2012 Appropriate Use Criteria for Coronary Revascularization Focused Update

ischemic symptoms, or no unstable ventricular arrhythmias at time of presentation ? Depressed LVEF ? Three-vessel CAD ? Elective/semielective revascularization A (8) 7. ? STEMI with successful treatment of the culprit artery by primary PCI or ?brinolysis ? Asymptomatic; no HF, no evidence of recurrent or provokable ischemia, or no unstable ventricular arrhythmias during index hospitalization ? Normal LVEF ? Revascularization of a non-infarct-related artery during index hospitalization I (2) 8. ? STEMI (...) and at a normal pace. Class IV: Inability to carry on any physical activity without discomfort—anginal symptoms may be pres- ent at rest. High-Risk Features for Short-Term Risk of Death or Nonfatal MI for UA/NSTEMI (16) At least 1 of the following: • History—accelerating tempo of ischemic symptoms in preceding 48 hours • Character of pain—prolonged ongoing (greater than 20 minutes) rest pain • Clinical ?ndings X Pulmonary edema, most likely due to ischemia X New or worsening mitral regurgitation murmur X S 3

2012 Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions

316. 2012 ACCF/AHA/ACP/AATS/PCNA/SCAI/STS Guideline for the Diagnosis and Management of Patients With Stable Ischemic Heart Disease: Executive Summary

to: accuracy, angina, asymptomatic patients, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), cardiac rehabilitation, chest pain, chronic angina, chronic coronary occlusions, chronic ischemic heart disease (IHD), chronic total occlusion, connective tissue disease, coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) versus medical therapy, coronary artery disease (CAD) and exercise, coro- nary calcium scanning, cardiac/coronary computed tomogra- phy angiography (CCTA), CMR angiography, CMR imag- ing, coronary stenosis, death, depression (...) myocardial infarction, history of heart failure, and prior aspirin use. †For comparative effectiveness recommendations (Class I and IIa; Level of Evidence A and B only), studies that support the use of comparator verbs should involve direct comparisons of the treatments or strategies being evaluated. 2567 JACC Vol. 60, No. 24, 2012 Fihn et al. December 18, 2012:2564–603 Stable Ischemic Heart Disease: Executive Summary Downloaded From: http://content.onlinejacc.org/ on 03/08/2013quality and availability

2012 Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions

317. An Update of Comprehensive Evidence-Based Guidelines for Interventional Techniques in Chronic Spinal Pain - Part 2 - Guidance and Recommendations

and to continue phosphodiesterase inhibitors (dipyridamole, cilostazol, and Aggrenox). • Ther e is limited evidence to discontinue antiplatelet therapy with platelet aggregation inhibitors to avoid bleeding and epidural hematomas and/or to continue antiplatelet therapy (clopidogrel, ticlopidine, prasugrel) during interventional techniques to avoid cerebrovascular and cardiovascular thromboembolic fatalities. • Ther e is limited evidence in reference to newer antithrombotic agents dabigatran (Pradaxa (...) ) and rivaroxan (Xarelto) to discontinue to avoid bleeding and epidural hematomas and are continued during interventional techniques to avoid cerebrovascular and cardiovascular thromboembolic events. Conclusion: Evidence is fair to good for 62% of diagnostic and 52% of therapeutic interventions assessed. Disclaimer: The authors are solely responsible for the content of this article. No statement on this article should be construed as an official position of ASIPP . The guidelines do not represent “standard

2013 American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians

318. Pet Ownership and Cardiovascular Risk Full Text available with Trip Pro

article Pet Ownership and Cardiovascular Risk A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association , MD, FAHA, Chair , PhD , PhD, CNP, FAHA , PhD , PhD , PhD, FAHA , RN, PhD , and PhD MD, MBA, FAHAon behalf of the American Heart Association Council on Clinical Cardiology and Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing Glenn N. Levine , Karen Allen , Lynne T. Braun , Hayley E. Christian , Erika Friedmann , Kathryn A. Taubert , Sue Ann Thomas , Deborah L. Wells , and Richard A. Lange (...) and on behalf of the American Heart Association Council on Clinical Cardiology and Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing Originally published 9 May 2013 Circulation. 2013;127:2353–2363 You are viewing the most recent version of this article. Previous versions: Introduction Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States. Despite efforts promoting primary and secondary CVD prevention, obesity and physical inactivity remain at epidemic proportions, with >60% of Americans

2013 American Heart Association

319. Cardiovascular Health: The Importance of Measuring Patient-Reported Health Status Full Text available with Trip Pro

Research, Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing, Council on Epidemiology and Prevention, Council on Peripheral Vascular Disease, and Stroke Council John S. Rumsfeld , Karen P. Alexander , David C. GoffJr , Michelle M. Graham , P. Michael Ho , Frederick A. Masoudi , Debra K. Moser , Véronique L. Roger , Mark S. Slaughter , Kim G. Smolderen , John A. Spertus , Mark D. Sullivan , Diane Treat-Jacobson , and Julie J. Zerwic and on behalf of the American Heart Association Council on Quality of Care (...) and Outcomes Research, Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing, Council on Epidemiology and Prevention, Council on Peripheral Vascular Disease, and Stroke Council Originally published 6 May 2013 Circulation. 2013;127:2233–2249 You are viewing the most recent version of this article. Previous versions: 1. Introduction The principal goals of health care are to help people “live longer and live better,” that is, to optimize both survival and health. In the American Heart Association’s (AHA) special

2013 American Heart Association

320. Thoracic Aortic Disease: Guidelines For the Diagnosis and Management of Patients With

for Thoracic Surgery, American College of Radiology, American Stroke Association, Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Interventional Radiology, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and Society for Vascular Medicine (developed in collaboration with the American College of Emergency Physicians). J Am Coll Cardiol 2010;55:e27–129. This article has been copublished in Circulation. Copies: This document is available on the World Wide Web (...) . Acute Aortic Syndromes .e58 8.1. Aortic Dissection .e58 8.1.1. Aortic Dissection De?nition .e58 8.1.2. Anatomic Classi?cation of Aortic Dissection .e58 8.1.3. Risk Factors for Aortic Dissection. . .e61 8.1.4. Clinical Presentation of Acute Thoracic Aortic Dissection .e62 8.1.4.1. SYMPTOMS OF ACUTE THORACIC AORTIC DISSECTION e62 8.1.4.2. PERFUSION DEFICITS AND END- ORGAN ISCHEMIA e62 8.1.5. Cardiac Complications .e64 8.1.5.1. ACUTE AORTIC REGURGITATION e64 8.1.5.2. MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA OR INFARCTION

2010 American College of Cardiology

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