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281. Diagnostic Criteria for Mild Cognitive Impairment in Parkinson?s Disease: Movement Disorder Society Task Force Guidelines

. Williams-Gray, MRCP, PhD 10 , Dag Aarsland, MD, PhD 11 , Jaime Kulisevsky, MD, PhD 12 , Maria C. Rodriguez-Oroz, MD, PhD 13 , David J. Burn, MD, FRCP 14 , Roger A. Barker, BSc, MBBS, MRCP, PhD 10 , and Murat Emre, MD 15 1 Division of Movement Disorders, Department of Neurology, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, USA; and Movement Disorders Program, Frazier Rehab Neuroscience Institute, Louisville, Kentucky, USA 2 Department of Neurological Sciences, Section of Parkinson Disease (...) (WTAR). These tests allow reasonably accurate estimates of verbal intelligence and are quite insensitive to cerebral deterioration in the absence of aphasia or marked dysarthria. Following the DSM-5 draft criteria for a mild neurocognitive disorder, 10 stronger evidence of cognitive decline comes from having previous test data on patients. Consequently, the task force advocates neuropsychological evaluation early in the course of PD to establish baseline cognitive abilities. 46 When such baseline

2012 European Academy of Neurology

282. Quality Improvement Guidelines for Endovascular Treatment of Traumatic Hemorrhage

Media, LLC and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE) 2012 Introduction This quality improvement guideline outlines the place of interventional radiology (IR) in trauma management and indicates how imaging and IR can be used in the context of hemorrhage in the severely injured patient, and when IR is appropriate and when it is contraindicated. Vascular injury may also lead to occlusion, and this will be discussed where relevant. There is no intention (...) the pro- portion of patients treated by NOM, these techniques should be promoted, provided suitable IR skills exist to perform embolization, stent grafting, or balloon occlusion to quickly control bleeding. (Recommendation C, level 3 evidence. This is equivalent to the evidence for surgical management; see Appendix 2.) Options for IR Involvement IR should be considered in terms of the techniques avail- able and how they may be used in a variety of clinical scenarios. In the context of trauma, vascular

2012 Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe

283. 2012 ACCF/AHA/ACR/SCAI/SIR/STS/SVM/SVN Key Data Elements and Definitions for Peripheral Atherosclerotic Vascular Disease

if the patient has a documented history of TIA consisting of a transient episode of neurological dysfunction caused by focal brain, spinal cord, or retinal ischemia without acute infarction. Note the following: ? Right retinal ? Right hemispheric ? Left retinal ? Left hemispheric ? Vertebrobasilar ? Unknown distribution Prior stroke Indicate whether the patient has a history of stroke, which is defined as an acute episode of neurological dysfunction caused by focal or global brain, spinal cord, or retinal (...) vascular injury as a result of hemorrhage or infarction. If present, record the type of stroke 26,27 : ? Ischemic ? Intracerebral hemorrhage ? Subarachnoid hemorrhage ? Unknown (Continued) Creager et al ACCF/AHA PAVD Data Standards 9 by guest on December 6, 2011 http://circ.ahajournals.org/ Downloaded from Table 1. Continued Element Name Definition If ischemic, list the most likely etiologies: ? Large-artery atherosclerosis of the extracranial vessels (eg, carotid) ? Large-artery atherosclerosis

2012 Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions

284. CCF/SCAI/STS/AATS/AHA/ASNC/HFSA/SCCT 2012 Appropriate Use Criteria for Coronary Revascularization Focused Update

ischemic symptoms, or no unstable ventricular arrhythmias at time of presentation ? Depressed LVEF ? Three-vessel CAD ? Elective/semielective revascularization A (8) 7. ? STEMI with successful treatment of the culprit artery by primary PCI or ?brinolysis ? Asymptomatic; no HF, no evidence of recurrent or provokable ischemia, or no unstable ventricular arrhythmias during index hospitalization ? Normal LVEF ? Revascularization of a non-infarct-related artery during index hospitalization I (2) 8. ? STEMI (...) and at a normal pace. Class IV: Inability to carry on any physical activity without discomfort—anginal symptoms may be pres- ent at rest. High-Risk Features for Short-Term Risk of Death or Nonfatal MI for UA/NSTEMI (16) At least 1 of the following: • History—accelerating tempo of ischemic symptoms in preceding 48 hours • Character of pain—prolonged ongoing (greater than 20 minutes) rest pain • Clinical ?ndings X Pulmonary edema, most likely due to ischemia X New or worsening mitral regurgitation murmur X S 3

2012 Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions

285. 2012 ACCF/AHA/ACP/AATS/PCNA/SCAI/STS Guideline for the Diagnosis and Management of Patients With Stable Ischemic Heart Disease: Executive Summary

to: accuracy, angina, asymptomatic patients, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), cardiac rehabilitation, chest pain, chronic angina, chronic coronary occlusions, chronic ischemic heart disease (IHD), chronic total occlusion, connective tissue disease, coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) versus medical therapy, coronary artery disease (CAD) and exercise, coro- nary calcium scanning, cardiac/coronary computed tomogra- phy angiography (CCTA), CMR angiography, CMR imag- ing, coronary stenosis, death, depression (...) myocardial infarction, history of heart failure, and prior aspirin use. †For comparative effectiveness recommendations (Class I and IIa; Level of Evidence A and B only), studies that support the use of comparator verbs should involve direct comparisons of the treatments or strategies being evaluated. 2567 JACC Vol. 60, No. 24, 2012 Fihn et al. December 18, 2012:2564–603 Stable Ischemic Heart Disease: Executive Summary Downloaded From: http://content.onlinejacc.org/ on 03/08/2013quality and availability

2012 Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions

286. An Update of Comprehensive Evidence-Based Guidelines for Interventional Techniques in Chronic Spinal Pain - Part 2 - Guidance and Recommendations

and to continue phosphodiesterase inhibitors (dipyridamole, cilostazol, and Aggrenox). • Ther e is limited evidence to discontinue antiplatelet therapy with platelet aggregation inhibitors to avoid bleeding and epidural hematomas and/or to continue antiplatelet therapy (clopidogrel, ticlopidine, prasugrel) during interventional techniques to avoid cerebrovascular and cardiovascular thromboembolic fatalities. • Ther e is limited evidence in reference to newer antithrombotic agents dabigatran (Pradaxa (...) ) and rivaroxan (Xarelto) to discontinue to avoid bleeding and epidural hematomas and are continued during interventional techniques to avoid cerebrovascular and cardiovascular thromboembolic events. Conclusion: Evidence is fair to good for 62% of diagnostic and 52% of therapeutic interventions assessed. Disclaimer: The authors are solely responsible for the content of this article. No statement on this article should be construed as an official position of ASIPP . The guidelines do not represent “standard

2013 American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians

287. Pet Ownership and Cardiovascular Risk Full Text available with Trip Pro

article Pet Ownership and Cardiovascular Risk A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association , MD, FAHA, Chair , PhD , PhD, CNP, FAHA , PhD , PhD , PhD, FAHA , RN, PhD , and PhD MD, MBA, FAHAon behalf of the American Heart Association Council on Clinical Cardiology and Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing Glenn N. Levine , Karen Allen , Lynne T. Braun , Hayley E. Christian , Erika Friedmann , Kathryn A. Taubert , Sue Ann Thomas , Deborah L. Wells , and Richard A. Lange (...) and on behalf of the American Heart Association Council on Clinical Cardiology and Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing Originally published 9 May 2013 Circulation. 2013;127:2353–2363 You are viewing the most recent version of this article. Previous versions: Introduction Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States. Despite efforts promoting primary and secondary CVD prevention, obesity and physical inactivity remain at epidemic proportions, with >60% of Americans

2013 American Heart Association

288. Cardiovascular Health: The Importance of Measuring Patient-Reported Health Status Full Text available with Trip Pro

Research, Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing, Council on Epidemiology and Prevention, Council on Peripheral Vascular Disease, and Stroke Council John S. Rumsfeld , Karen P. Alexander , David C. GoffJr , Michelle M. Graham , P. Michael Ho , Frederick A. Masoudi , Debra K. Moser , Véronique L. Roger , Mark S. Slaughter , Kim G. Smolderen , John A. Spertus , Mark D. Sullivan , Diane Treat-Jacobson , and Julie J. Zerwic and on behalf of the American Heart Association Council on Quality of Care (...) and Outcomes Research, Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing, Council on Epidemiology and Prevention, Council on Peripheral Vascular Disease, and Stroke Council Originally published 6 May 2013 Circulation. 2013;127:2233–2249 You are viewing the most recent version of this article. Previous versions: 1. Introduction The principal goals of health care are to help people “live longer and live better,” that is, to optimize both survival and health. In the American Heart Association’s (AHA) special

2013 American Heart Association

289. Thoracic Aortic Disease: Guidelines For the Diagnosis and Management of Patients With

for Thoracic Surgery, American College of Radiology, American Stroke Association, Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Interventional Radiology, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and Society for Vascular Medicine (developed in collaboration with the American College of Emergency Physicians). J Am Coll Cardiol 2010;55:e27–129. This article has been copublished in Circulation. Copies: This document is available on the World Wide Web (...) . Acute Aortic Syndromes .e58 8.1. Aortic Dissection .e58 8.1.1. Aortic Dissection De?nition .e58 8.1.2. Anatomic Classi?cation of Aortic Dissection .e58 8.1.3. Risk Factors for Aortic Dissection. . .e61 8.1.4. Clinical Presentation of Acute Thoracic Aortic Dissection .e62 8.1.4.1. SYMPTOMS OF ACUTE THORACIC AORTIC DISSECTION e62 8.1.4.2. PERFUSION DEFICITS AND END- ORGAN ISCHEMIA e62 8.1.5. Cardiac Complications .e64 8.1.5.1. ACUTE AORTIC REGURGITATION e64 8.1.5.2. MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA OR INFARCTION

2010 American College of Cardiology

290. Care of the Patient with Accommodative and Vergence Dysfunction

hyperdeviations are usually small in magnitude and nonprogressive over time. Congenital fourth nerve palsies, which will decompensate over time, may be first noted after insult such as high fever or trauma. A newly acquired fourth nerve palsy occurs after a vascular, infectious, traumatic, or neoplastic incident. 75 Depending on the etiology of the vertical deviation, its course may change. Deviations that occur secondary to vascular or ischemic Statement of the Problem 19 involvement tend to improve (...) on the basis of responses to occlusion. In simulated DE, occlusion dramatically affects slow vergence, increasing the angle of deviation slightly at distance and significantly at near. Occlusion does not affect true DE. c. Basic Exophoria The patient with basic exophoria has a deviation of similar magnitude at both distance and near. 20, 21 d. Convergence Excess The patient with convergence excess (CE) has a near deviation at least 3 PD more esophoric than the distance deviation. 22 The etiology

2010 American Optometric Association

291. Cardiovascular Risk in Asymptomatic Adults: Guideline For Assessment of

from consideration patients with a diagnosis of CVD or a coronary event, for example, angina or anginal equivalent, myocardial infarction (MI), or revascularization with percutaneous coronary in- tervention or coronary artery bypass graft surgery. It also excludes testing for patients with known peripheral artery disease (PAD) and cerebral vascular disease. This guideline is not intended to replace other sources of information on cardiovascular risk assessment in speci?c disease groups or higher (...) PATIENTS OR GUIDING THERAPY e66 2.5. Cardiac and Vascular Tests for Risk Assessment in Asymptomatic Adults e66 2.5.1. Resting Electrocardiogram e66 2.5.1.1. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR RESTING ELECTROCARDIOGRAM e66 2.5.1.2. GENERAL DESCRIPTION e67 2.5.1.3. ASSOCIATION WITH INCREASED RISK AND INCREMENTAL RISK e67 2.5.1.4. USEFULNESS IN MOTIVATING PATIENTS, GUIDING THERAPY, AND IMPROVING OUTCOMES e68 2.5.2. Resting Echocardiography for Left Ventricular Structure and Function and Left Ventricular Hypertrophy

2010 American College of Cardiology

292. Nutrition Therapy in the Adult Hospitalized Patient

of the nares, an increase in aspiration pneumonia, sinusitis, and esophageal ulceration or stricture ( 85 ). Certain institutional prac- tices may dictate early placement of a tracheostomy and percuta- neous gastrostomy tube in trauma patients. Early gastrostomy tube placement in stroke patients may be needed to facilitate transfer to a rehabilitation center. More than any other patient population, those with a cerebral vascular accident benefi t from percutaneous gastrostomy placement as a bridge to oral (...) obstruction of the GI tract, uncontrolled peritonitis, and ischemic bowel ( 33 ). Many conditions that were previously con- sidered to be contraindications to enteral feeding may be situa- tions where it is appropriate to provide EN with caution in order to improve outcome. Such conditions include ileus, open abdomen, recent gut anastomoses, GI bleeding, bowel-wall edema, and a stable patient on vasopressor therapy to maintain adequate mean arterial blood pressure ( 34 ). PN via a central line catheter

2016 American College of Gastroenterology

293. Importance of Assessing Cardiorespiratory Fitness in Clinical Practice: A Case for Fitness as a Clinical Vital Sign: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association Full Text available with Trip Pro

, alcohol consumption, and obesity, limited data are available regarding the potential prophylactic role of CRF in reducing the incidence of cerebrovascular events. Nevertheless, according to a 10.9-year follow-up study of older men, there was a strong, inverse dose-response association between time spent walking and risk of stroke, independent of walking pace (intensity) and established and novel risk factors. More than a decade ago, researchers examined the association between CRF and stroke mortality (...) , PT, FAHA , MD, MPH, PhD , PhD, FAHA , PhD, FAHA , PhD , PhD, FAHA , MD, FAHA , MD , PhD, FAHA , MD, PhD, MBA , MD , PhD , and MD, MPH, PhD PhDOn behalf of the American Heart Association Physical Activity Committee of the Council on Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health; Council on Clinical Cardiology; Council on Epidemiology and Prevention; Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing; Council on Functional Genomics and Translational Biology; and Stroke Council Robert Ross , Steven N. Blair , Ross

2016 American Heart Association

294. ICU Admission, Discharge, and Triage Guidelines Full Text available with Trip Pro

, the literature does not support a survival benefit for specialized over general ICU care in the case of common admitting diagnoses such as acute coronary syndrome, ischemic stroke, intracranial hemorrhage, pneumonia, abdominal surgery, or coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Admission to a specialized ICU of a patient with a primary diagnosis not associated with that specialty (i.e., “boarding”) is associated with increased risk-adjusted mortality ( ). Although there are notable limitations in published (...) does occur in hospital wards, usually during the activation of a RRS, deploying a rapid response team, or when a critical care bed is not immediately available to an acutely ill general ward patient. In some institutions, chronic critically ill patients are transferred from the ICU to the general ward for such processes as weaning from mechanical ventilation or starting rehabilitation. Although a randomized controlled trial would be difficult, several retrospective and observational studies have

2016 Society of Critical Care Medicine

295. Guidelines for the Provision and Assessment of Nutrition Support Therapy in the Adult Critically Ill Patient

, and hypotension, and thus are at increased risk for subclinical ischemia/reperfusion injuries involving the intestinal microcirculation. Ischemic bowel is a very rare complication associated with EN ( ). In a retrospective review of patients requiring stable low doses of vasopressors, those patients receiving early delivery of EN had lower ICU mortality (22.5% vs 28.3%, p = .03) and hospital mortality (34% vs 44%, p < 0.001) than those receiving late EN, respectively. The beneficial effect of early EN (...) assessment include an evaluation of comorbid conditions, function of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, and risk of aspiration. We suggest not using traditional nutrition indicators or surrogate markers, as they are not validated in critical care. Rationale: In the critical care setting, the traditional serum protein markers (albumin, prealbumin, transferrin, retinol-binding protein) are a reflection of the acute phase response (increases in vascular permeability and reprioritization of hepatic protein

2016 Society of Critical Care Medicine

296. Guidelines for the Provision and Assessment of Nutrition Support Therapy in the Adult Critically Ill Patient

withdrawal of vasopressor support. Rationale: At the height of critical illness, EN is being provided to patients who are prone to GI dysmotility, sepsis, and hypotension and thus are at increased risk for subclinical ischemia/reperfusion injuries involving the intestinal microcirculation. Ischemic bowel is a very rare complication associated with EN. In a retrospective review of patients requiring stable low doses of vasopressors, those patients receiving early delivery of EN had lower ICU mortality (...) of aspiration. We suggest not using traditional nutrition indicators or surrogate markers, as they are not validated in critical care. Rationale: In the critical care setting, the traditional serum protein markers (albumin, prealbumin, transferrin, retinol‐binding protein) are a reflection of the acute‐phase response (increases in vascular permeability and reprioritization of hepatic protein synthesis) and do not accurately represent nutrition status in the ICU setting. Anthropometrics are not reliable

2016 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition

297. Medical Training to Achieve Competency in Lifestyle Counseling: An Essential Foundation for Prevention and Treatment of Cardiovascular Diseases and Other Chronic Medical Conditions: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association Full Text available with Trip Pro

; the Exercise, Cardiac Rehabilitation, and Secondary Prevention Committee of the Council on Clinical Cardiology; and the Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing Marie-France Hivert , Ross Arena , Daniel E. Forman , Penny M. Kris-Etherton , Patrick E. McBride , Russell R. Pate , Bonnie Spring , Jennifer Trilk , Linda V. Van Horn , and William E. Kraus and On behalf of the American Heart Association Physical Activity Committee of the Council on Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health; the Behavior Change (...) Committee, a joint committee of the Council on Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health and the Council on Epidemiology and Prevention; the Exercise, Cardiac Rehabilitation, and Secondary Prevention Committee of the Council on Clinical Cardiology; and the Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing Originally published 6 Sep 2016 Circulation. 2016;134:e308–e327 You are viewing the most recent version of this article. Previous versions: Introduction A healthy lifestyle is fundamental for the prevention

2016 American Heart Association

298. Current Diagnostic and Treatment Strategies for Specific Dilated Cardiomyopathies: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association Full Text available with Trip Pro

that nonischemic cardiomyopa- thy can include cardiomyopathies caused by volume or pressure overload (such as hypertension or valvular heart disease) that are not conventionally accepted under the definition of DCM. 1,5 Again, in general practice and clinical research trials, the term ischemic cardiomyopathy is defined as cardiomyopathy caused by ischemic heart disease. Current use of ischemic cardiomyopathy terminol- ogy implies ventricular dilation and depressed myocardial contractility caused by ischemia (...) demonstrated in patients with sinus rhythm when the atria develop mechanical “stand- still” as a result of amyloid infiltration of the atrial walls. High left atrial pressures in the setting of HF also likely contribute to atrial dysfunction. The benefit of anticoagu- lation should be weighed against the potential increased risk of bleeding in patients with amyloid angiopathy. Anticoagulation is indicated in patients with atrial fibril- lation and in those with a history of embolic stroke or transient

2016 American Heart Association

299. Contributory Risk and Management of Comorbidities of Hypertension, Obesity, Diabetes Mellitus, Hyperlipidemia, and Metabolic Syndrome in Chronic Heart Failure: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association Full Text available with Trip Pro

140/90 mm Hg. The prevalence of hypertension is steadily increasing, even with the expanded use of antihypertensive medications. 16 It is widely recognized that hypertension is associated with increased cardiovascular and all-cause mortality independently of other risk factors. 14,17 Specific HF mortality attributable to hypertension is probably underreported because of the competing adjudication for stroke or myocardial infarction (MI) at the end of the spectrum of hypertensive cardiovascular (...) may be accentuated through its confounding effect on ischemic heart disease and other cardiovascular outcomes such as stroke. Fur- thermore, these studies predate current HF management strategies and guidelines and may no longer reflect the risk in the current population treated for hypertension. However, they underscore the importance of hyperten- sion as a cause of HF when left untreated. The residual lifetime risk for hypertension for middle-aged and elderly Table 1. Applying Classification

2016 American Heart Association

300. Cervical Radiculopathy and Myelopathy

is intended as a community standard for health care providers who treat injured or ill workers in the Washington workers’ compensation system under Title 51 RCW, and as review criteria for the department’s utilization review team, to help ensure that diagnosis and treatment of cervical neck conditions are of the highest quality. The emphasis is on accurate diagnosis and curative or rehabilitative treatment (see WAC 296-20-01002 for definitions). This guideline was developed in 2014 by a subcommittee (...) of the statutory Industrial Insurance Medical Advisory Committee (IIMAC). Subcommittee members are actively practicing physicians specializing in rehabilitation medicine, occupational medicine, orthopedic surgery, neurology, and pain management. The subcommittee based its recommendations on the weight of the best available clinical and scientific evidence from a systematic review of the literature, and on a consensus of expert opinion when scientific evidence was insufficient. The emphasis of this guideline

2016 Washington State Department of Labor and Industries

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