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141. Management of stable angina

to prevent new vascular events 17 4.4 Medication concordance 18 5 Interventional cardiology and cardiac surgery 19 5.1 Coronary artery anatomy and definitions 19 5.2 Percutaneous coronary intervention 19 5.3 Coronary artery bypass grafting 21 5.4 Choice of revascularisation technique 23 5.5 Postintervention drug therapy 26 5.6 Postintervention rehabilitation 28 5.7 Managing restenosis 28 5.8 Managing refractory angina 28 6 Stable angina and non-cardiac surgery 30 6.1 Assessment prior to surgery 30 6.2 (...) of conduit in surgical revascularisation Updated 5.3.4 Effect on cognition Completely revised 5.4 Choice of revascularisation technique Completely revised 5.4.1 Multivessel disease New 5.4.2 Left main-stem disease New 5.4.3 Diabetes mellitus New 5.4.4 Chronic kidney disease New 5.4.5 Age New 5.5.2 Dual antiplatelet therapy following percutaneous coronary intervention New 5.8 Managing refractory angina Completely revised 5.8.1 Spinal cord stimulation Completely revised 5.8.2 Surgical transmyocardial laser

2018 SIGN

142. The Management of adult patients with severe chronic small intestinal dysmotility

– Infant colic (developmental) ? Autoimmune – Antineuronal antibodies – Ganglionosis ? Infective – Chagas' disease, – Herpes viruses (eg, EBV, CMV, VZV) or – Polyoma viruses (JC virus) Secondary (extrinsic) ? Generalised neurological disorders – Brainstem lesions – Spinal cord injury – Multiple sclerosis – Parkinson’s disease – Neurological effects of diabetes mellitus – Autonomic system degeneration ? Paraneoplastic syndromes (often with antineuronal antibodies (especially anti Hu)) – Small cell lung (...) that innervate the gut (including autonomic system degeneration and the neurological effects of diabetes mellitus (most common) and other endocrine or metabolic disorders) can indirectly cause gut dysmotility. Brainstem lesions, spinal cord injury, multiple scle- rosis, Parkinson’s disease (basal ganglia calcification) and leuko- encephalopathy can all affect gut motility. 74 75 A lymphocytic leiomyositis and myenteric ganglionitis have been described in the ileum of children with cystic fibrosis and distal

2020 British Society of Gastroenterology

144. Supra Pubic Catheter (SPC) - Adult Clinical Guideline, Competencies & Patient Information Leaflet

discharge. Page 8/31 High Risk for Adverse Outcomes • Artificial Heart Valve o Discussion with infection control team • Specific Spinal Cord Considerations • If client is a spinal cord injured client above T6 understand autonomic dysreflexia and ensure treatment algorithm for autonomic dysreflexia in spinal cord injury is present • If spinal client ascertain if client has used Viagra or Levitra in the last 24hrs or Cialis in the last 4 days as GTN spray, tablet or patches cannot be used Alerts • Do (...) not clamp the catheter in SCI above T6 • Ascertain if client is on anticoagulants prior to procedure • If the client has an artificial heart valve, discuss antibiotic cover with medical officer prior to change. • Potential risk of creating a false passage associated with forced instrumentation • Balloon inflated in urethra/tract resulting in trauma, haemorrhage, rupture or necrosis • Autonomic dysreflexia handout to be given to all patients/ clients with a spinal cord injury at or above the 6 th

2016 Agency for Clinical Innovation

145. Female Indwelling Urinary Catheterisation (IUC) - Adult - Clinical Guideline, Competencies & Patient Information Leaflet

with urology and/or infection control team • Specific Spinal Cord Considerations Page 8/28 • If client is a spinal cord injured client above T6 understand autonomic dysreflexia and ensure treatment algorithm for autonomic dysreflexia in spinal cord injury is present • If spinal client ascertain if client has used Viagra or Levitra in the last 24hrs or Cialis in the last 4 days as GTN spray, tablet or patches cannot be used Alerts • Do not clamp the catheter in SCI above T6 • Ascertain if client (...) is on anticoagulants prior to procedure • If the client has an artificial heart valve, discuss antibiotic cover with medical officer prior to change. • Potential risk of creating a false passage associated with forced instrumentation • Balloon inflated in urethra/tract resulting in trauma, haemorrhage, rupture or necrosis • Autonomic dysreflexia handout to be given to all patients/ clients with a spinal cord injury at or above the 6 th thoracic level and who have a urethral catheter in situ Autonomic Dysreflexia

2016 Agency for Clinical Innovation

146. Trial of Void - Community - Clinical Guideline

OF EQUIPMENT AND FUNDING BODIES 5 Continence Aids Payment Scheme (CAPS) 5 Enable NSW Aids and Equipment Program 5 BrightSky Australia offers 6 Independence Australia 6 Intouch Direct 6 Chemist 6 Department of Veterans’ Affairs (DVA) 7 REFERENCES 8 Page 2/8 Statement of Principle/Outcome A trial of void assesses the ability of the bladder to empty. Staff Registered Nurse. Enrolled nurse or undergraduate student nurse under the supervision of a RN. ALERT Patients with spinal cord injury at and above (...) or any of the following: ? they are a high care resident in a Australian Government funded aged care home ? they are eligible for assistance with continence aids under the Rehabilitation Appliances Program ( RAP ) which is available through the Department of Veterans’ Affairs ? they receive an Australian government funded Extended Aged Care at Home Package (EACH) or an extended Aged Care at Home Dementia Package ( EACH D package ) Further information on eligibility and to obtain an application form

2016 Agency for Clinical Innovation

147. Trial of Void - Hospital - Clinical Guideline

Continence Aids Payment Scheme (CAPS) 5 Enable NSW Aids and Equipment Program 5 BrightSky Australia offers 6 Independence Australia 6 Intouch Direct 6 Chemist 6 Department of Veterans’ Affairs (DVA) 7 REFERENCES 8 Page 2/8 Statement of Principle/outcome A trial of void assesses the ability of the bladder to empty. Staff Registered Nurse. Enrolled nurse or undergraduate student nurse under the supervision of a RN ALERT Patients with spinal cord injury at and above the level T6 should not have (...) Report from an appropriate health professional such as their medical practitioner or continence nurse about their condition. Eligible CAPS clients receive an annual indexed payment for continence products A patient is NOT eligible for CAPS if their incontinence is not permanent or severe or any of the following: ? they are a high care resident in a Australian Government funded aged care home ? they are eligible for assistance with continence aids under the Rehabilitation Appliances Program ( RAP

2016 Agency for Clinical Innovation

148. 5th ESO-ESMO International Consensus Guidelines for Advanced Breast Cancer (ABC 5) Full Text available with Trip Pro

to treatment, rehabilitation, follow-up and palliative care, including services and support for ABC patients and their caregivers, should be implemented by SBUs. Expert opinion/A I/A Expert opinion/A Expert opinion/B 100% General statements: QoL Strong consideration should be given to the use of validated PROMs for patients to record the symptoms of disease and side effects of treatment experienced as a regular part of clinical care. These PROMs should be simple and user-friendly to facilitate their use

2020 European Society for Medical Oncology

149. Acquired Temporomandibular Disorders in Infants, Children, and Adolescents

. Alamoudi N. Correlation between oral parafunction and temporomandibular disorders and emotional status among Saudi children. J Clin Pediatr Dent 2001;26(1):71-80. 46. Turp JC, Schindler H. The dental occlusion as a suspected cause for TMD: Epidemiological and etiological con- siderations. J Oral Rehab 2012;39(7):502-12. 47. De Boever JA, Carlsson GE, Klineberg IJ. Need for occlusal therapy and prosthodontic treatment in the management of temporomandibular disorders. Part I. Occlusal interference (...) and occlusal adjustment. J Oral Rehabil 2000;27(5):367-79.THE REFERENCE MANUAL OF PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY 385 BEST PRACTICES: TEMPOROMANDIBULAR DISORDERS 48. Taskaya-Yilmaz N, Ögütcen-Toller M, Saraç YS. Rela- tionship between the TMJ disc and condyle position on MRI and occlusal contacts on lateral excursions in TMD patients. J Oral Rehab 2004;31(8):754-8. 49. Henrikson T, Nilner M. Temporomandibular disorders, occlusion and orthodontic treatment. J Orthod 2003; 30(2):129-37; discussion 127. 50. Egermark I

2019 American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry

150. Monitoring and Management of Pediatric Patients Before, During, and After Sedation for Diagnostic and Therapeutic Procedures

syndromes), neurologic impairments that might increase the potential for airway obstruction, obesity, a history of snoring or OSA, 325-328 or cervical spine instability in Down syn- drome, Marfan syndrome, skeletal dysplasia, and other conditions; (4) pregnancy status (as many as 1% of menarchal females presenting for general anesthesia at children’s hospitals are pregnant) 329-331 because of concerns for the potential adverse effects of most sedating and anesthetic drugs on the fetus 329,332-338 ; (5

2019 American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry

151. Pain Management Programs – Which Patient for Which Program?

falls in frail older people: a process evaluation. Research in Nursing & Health 2013; 36(3):257-70. 9. Flink I, Nicholas MK, Boersma K, Linton SJ. Reducing the threat value of chronic pain: A preliminary replicated single-case study of interoceptive exposure versus distraction in six individuals with chronic back pain. Beh Res Ther 2009; 47: 721-728. 10. Guzman J, Esmail R, Karjalainen K et al. Multidisciplinary rehabilitation for chronic low back pain: systematic review. Br Med J 2001; 322:1511-16 (...) controlled trial of exposure in vivo for patients with spinal pain reporting fear of work-related activities. Eur J Pain 2008; 12:722–730. 14. Marhold C, Linton SJ, Melin L. A cognitive- behavioral return-to-work program: effects on pain patients with a history of long-term versus short- term sick leave. Pain 2001; 91: 155-163. 15. Nicholas MK, Wilson PH and Goyen J. Comparison of Cognitive-behavioural group treatment and an alternative non-psychological treatment for chronic low back pain. Pain 1992; 48

2017 Agency for Clinical Innovation

152. Male Indwelling Urinary Catheterisation (IUC) - Adult Clinical Guideline, Competencies & Patient Information Leaflet

catheter and insert a new catheter and assess possible causes. • In an acute setting, if patient requires opioid medication before catheter change, the patient has to be monitored for a period of time following the medication guidelines before discharge. • Another alternative for long term catheters, may need to consider supra pubic catheterisation.Page 8/30 High Risk for Adverse Outcomes • Artificial Heart Valve o Discussion with infection control team • Specific Spinal Cord Considerations • If client (...) is a spinal cord injured client above T6 understand autonomic dysreflexia and ensure treatment algorithm for autonomic dysreflexia in spinal cord injury is present • If spinal client ascertain if client has used Viagra or Levitra in the last 24hrs or Cialis in the last 4 days as GTN spray, tablet or patches cannot be used Alerts • Do not clamp the catheter in SCI above T6 • Ascertain if client is on anticoagulants prior to procedure • If the client has an artificial heart valve, discuss antibiotic cover

2017 Agency for Clinical Innovation

153. Health Care in People with Intellectual Disability Guidelines

Hypoglycaemic agent Thyroid Function Date: TSH = ___________ Atlanto-axial Instability (Down syndrome) UMN signs Yes No Cervical spine Xray Date: Instability: Yes No 23Guardianship T ribunal P E R S O N R E S P O N S I B L E ‘PERSON RESPONSIBLE’ Medical and dental practitioners have a legal and professional responsibility to get consent to treatments before treating any patient. The patient usually gives this consent. If the patient is not capable of consenting to their own treatment, the practitioner

2014 Agency for Clinical Innovation

154. Closed Head Injury CPG 2nd Ed. Summary Report

. Prof. Paul Middleton, Director, Ambulance Research Institute, Ambulance Service of NSW Review Group Dr Rod Bishop, Director Emergency Services, Nepean Hospital Dr Peter Clark, Clinical Director, NSW ITIM Dr Scott D’Amours, Trauma Director, Liverpool Hospital Assoc. Prof. Michael Fearnside AM (Emeritus), Neurosurgeon, Westmead Hospital Dr Adeline Hodgkinson, Director Brain Injury Rehabilitation Unit, Liverpool Hospital Mr Peter Mackay, Trauma Clinical Nurse Consultant, Gosford Hospital Assoc. Prof (...) ’ or “concussion” are used to describe the subsequent functional outcome. The terms “mild head injury”, “mild traumatic brain injury” and “concussion” are largely interchangeable and which term is used depends on whether you are examining emergency medicine, trauma, rehabilitation or sports medicine literature. It is difficult to find two studies that define mild head injury in exactly the same way so comparison of data can be difficult. 6, 8-10, 13 Similarly, comparison of data in moderate to severe head

2013 Agency for Clinical Innovation

155. Closed Head Injury CPG 2nd Ed. Full report

53 Appendices 83 Appendix 1: Definition of mild head injury 83 Appendix 2: Initial GCS versus abnormal CT/Neurosur gery 87 Appendix 3: Westmead PTA Scale 89 Appendix 4: Abbreviated Westmead PTA Scale 91 Appendix 5: The Glasgow Coma Scale – a practical implementation guide 94 Appendix 6: Mild head injury discharge advice 101 Appendix 7: NSW Brain Injury Rehabilitation Program 103 Appendix 8: Methodology 104 Appendix 9: Search Strategies 108 References 116 ContentsPAGE ii Initial Management (...) , Ambulance Service of NSW Review Group Dr Rod Bishop, Director Emergency Services, Nepean Hospital Dr Peter Clark, Clinical Director, NSW ITIM Dr Scott D’Amours, Trauma Director, Liverpool Hospital Assoc. Prof. Michael Fearnside AM (Emeritus), Neurosurgeon, Westmead Hospital Dr Adeline Hodgkinson, Director Brain Injury Rehabilitation Unit, Liverpool Hospital Mr Peter Mackay, Trauma Clinical Nurse Consultant, Gosford Hospital Assoc. Prof. Mark Sheridan, Neurosurgeon, Director of Neurosciences, Liverpool

2013 Agency for Clinical Innovation

156. The Primary Care Management of Headache

for the Management of Concussion-mild Traumatic Brain Injury. Available at: https://www.healthquality.va.gov/guidelines/Rehab/mtbi/ VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guideline for the Primary Care Management of Headache July 2020 Page 9 of 150 Medication overuse headache, which has previously been called medication-misuse headache, rebound headache, or drug-induced headache, is an exceedingly common type of headache seen in primary and specialty care settings resulting from the excessive and inappropriate use of non (...) that is of particular interest to VA/DoD providers is a persistent headache attributed to a traumatic injury to the d See the VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Concussion-mild Traumatic Brain Injury. Available at: https://www.healthquality.va.gov/guidelines/Rehab/mtbi/ VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guideline for the Primary Care Management of Headache July 2020 Page 11 of 150 head, also known as a PTH. According to ICHD-3, to be defined as a PTH, the onset of the headache must be within seven days

2020 VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guidelines

157. The Non-Surgical Management of Hip & Knee Osteoarthritis

to the management of OA, from which Work Group members were recruited. The specialties and clinical areas of interest included: primary care, nursing, physical therapy, clinical pharmacology, internal medicine, dietetics, orthopedic surgery, rheumatology, family medicine, sports medicine, physical medicine and rehabilitation, and pain management. The guideline development process for the 2020 CPG update consisted of: 1. Formulating and prioritizing KQs and defining critical outcomes 2. Convening a patient focus

2020 VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guidelines

159. Disorders of Ejaculation: An AUA/SMSNA Guideline

, and more recently humans, has indicated the presence of galaninergic neurons arranged in columns within the central spinal cord. 10 Lesion of these structures is strongly associated with ejaculatory failure; it is likely that these neurons are responsible for integrating stimuli from peripheral and cerebral sources and triggering the ejaculatory reflex. Some experts have described this structure as the “spinal ejaculation generator” (SEG). 10 Ejaculation consists of two distinct phases. The first (...) contributions from the bulbourethral glands and from spermatozoa transported from the epididymis via the vas deferens. 5 The second phase is ejection, a reflex driven by the somatic nervous system, specifically the pudendal nerve. Ejection is characterized by repeated contractions of the bulbospongiosus and ischiocavernous muscles leading to forceful expulsion of seminal fluid from the urethral meatus. 4, 5 A cluster of motor neurons in spinal segments S2-4 (“Onuf’s nucleus”) appears to be of particular

2020 American Urological Association

160. Low Back Pain

three months. Adverse effects are infrequent and include headache, fever, and subdural penetration; rare but catastrophic events, including epidural abscess and paralysis, can occur. See Appendix G and the companion document Radiological Diagnostic and Therapeutic Interventions Directed to Lumbar Spine Pathology for further information. SR (G4) + EO (GUC) Multidisciplinary Treatment programs ? No evidence was found to recommend interdisciplinary rehabilitation for acute low back pain (pain less than (...) to standing AP and lateral in order to achieve better assessment of stability and stenosis. CT scans are best limited to suspected fractures or contraindication to MRI. X-rays of the lumbar spine are very poor indicators of serious pathology. Hence, in the absence of clinical red flags spinal x-rays are not encouraged. More specific and appropriate diagnostic imaging should be performed on the basis of the pathology being sought (e.g., DEXA scan for bone density and bone scan for tumours and inflammatory

2017 Accelerating Change Transformation Team

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