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101. Neuropathic pain in adults: pharmacological management in non-specialist settings

secondary to tumour antigens, or caused by direct invasion or compression of neural structures). Examples of conditions that can cause central neuropathic pain include stroke, spinal cord injury and multiple sclerosis. Neuropathic pain can be intermittent or constant, and spontaneous or provoked. Typical descriptions of the pain include terms such as shooting, stabbing, like an electric shock, burning, tingling, tight, numb, prickling, itching and a sensation of pins and needles. People may also (...) , and concurrent medications the importance of dosage titration and the titration process, providing the person with individualised information and advice coping strategies for pain and for possible adverse effects of treatment non-pharmacological treatments, for example, physical and psychological therapies (which may be offered through a rehabilitation service) and surgery (which may be offered through specialist services). For more information about involving people in decisions and supporting adherence

2013 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

102. Improving outcomes in children and young people with cancer

Rehabilitation 68 Psychosocial care 73 Long-term sequelae 77 Palliative care 81 Bereavement 87 2 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence Improving Outcomes in Children and Young People with Cancer Contents3 Service organisation 90 Delivery of care 91 Multidisciplinary teams 91 Continuity of care 97 Protocol-based care 100 Place of care 103 Principal treatment centres 103 Hospitals with shared care arrangements 105 Other locations of care 106 Cancer networks 117 Communication with children (...) Diagnosis Shaded area = care pathway Supportive care Treatment Allied treatment services Survivors Rehabilitation Palliative care Follow-up Figure 1 The care pathway for children and young people with cancer and its wider context.Definition of children and young people There are various definitions of the boundary between childhood and adulthood used by society, some of which define a legal entitlement or access to services. Children are recognised as different because they are, both in terms

2005 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

103. Improving supportive and palliative care for adults with cancer

- Priorities 32 - Ongoing research 32 The topic areas 1. Co-ordination of care 35 2. User involvement in planning, delivering and evaluating services 49 3. Face-to-face communication 56 4. Information 64 15. Psychological support services 74 6. Social support services 86 7. Spiritual support services 95 8. General palliative care services, including care of dying patients 105 9. Specialist palliative care services 122 10. Rehabilitation services 134 11. Complementary therapy services 148 12. Services (...) be able to provide support to patients in their own homes, community hospitals and care homes. 11Rehabilitation services ES27 Cancer and its treatment can have a major impact on a patient’s ability to carry on with his or her usual daily routines. Activities most people take for granted, such as moving, speaking, eating, drinking and engaging in sexual activity, can be severely impaired. Cancer rehabilitation aims to maximise physical function, promote independence and help people adapt

2004 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

105. Improving outcomes for people with brain and other central nervous system tumours

on cancer services: brain and other CNS tumours Contents Foreword 4 Key recommendations 5 1. Background 8 Scope of the document 8 CNS tumours: nature 8 Incidence, prevalence, mortality, and survival rates and trends 10 Classification of CNS tumours 16 Aetiology and risk factors 16 Familial syndromes with an increased risk of tumours of the CNS 17 Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment 18 Brain tumours 18 Rarer CNS tumours 19 Spinal tumours 19 Skull base tumours 20 Pituitary tumours 20 Other rarer CNS tumours (...) grades I and 2) 58 High-grade glioma (WHO grades 3 and 4) 59 Initial treatment 59 Treatment at relapse 61 Meningioma 61 Metastases 62 Follow-up 63 6. Treatment and follow-up: pituitary, spinal cord and skull base tumours 74 Pituitary and pituitary-related tumours 80 Intradural spinal cord tumours 81 Skull base tumours 83 7. Treatment and follow-up: primary CNS lymphoma, medulloblastoma, pineal tumours and optic gliomas 89 Primary central nervous system lymphoma 90 Medulloblastoma 92 Pineal tumours 92

2006 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

106. Improving outcomes for people with sarcoma

treatment: bone sarcomas 62 1 Improving Outcomes for People with Sarcoma Contents7. Improving treatment: soft tissue sarcomas 68 Limb, limb girdle and truncal soft tissue sarcomas 68 Retroperitoneal and pelvic soft tissue sarcomas 73 Soft tissue sarcomas requiring shared management 76 8. Supportive and palliative care 81 The key worker 82 Physiotherapy, occupational therapy and rehabilitation 83 Orthotic and prosthetic appliance provision 86 Specialist palliative care 88 9. Follow-up of patients 92 10 (...) is recognised and underpinned by government targets, the support both to the individual patient with a key worker and to the MDT with administrative input is vital. For patients requiring limb amputation, the recommendations about the provision of high-quality prostheses and rehabilitation is another important aspect of this guidance. We have included advice on follow-up and on supportive and palliative care, where the recommendations complement the NICE guidance on ‘Improving supportive and palliative care

2006 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

107. Major trauma: service delivery

using Canadian C-spine rule Spinal injury recommendations 1.1.5 and 1.1.6 Major trauma: service delivery (NG40) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 18 of 23T able 2 Hospital management of major trauma: recommendations with implications for service delivery Clinical area Clinical area Interv Interventions entions Recommendations Recommendations Circulatory access Peripheral intravenous access Major trauma (...) Rehabilitation 15 3 Dedicated transfer service 16 4 National pre-hospital triage tool 16 Appendix: Recommendations that might have particular implications for service delivery 17 T able 1 Pre-hospital management of major trauma: recommendations with implications for service delivery 17 T able 2 Hospital management of major trauma: recommendations with implications for service delivery 19 Major trauma: service delivery (NG40) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https

2016 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

108. Management of suspected viral encephalitis in children Full Text available with Trip Pro

practice before and after implementation of the guidelines. Figure 1 Algorithm for the management of patients with suspected viral encephalitis. | | Methods A literature search was performed on the Medline database for the years 1998–2008, to identify for all (English language) publications using the key words (‘Encephalitis’ AND: ‘Symptoms’; ‘Signs’; ‘Management’; ‘Diagnosis’; ‘Investigation’; ‘Lumbar Puncture’; ‘Cerebrospinal Fluid’ (CSF); ‘Computed Tomography (CT)’; ‘Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI (...) . The role of lumbar puncture in children with suspected central nervous system infection. BMC Pediatrics . 2002 ; 2 : 8 | | | , x 22 Davies, N.W., Sharief, M.K., and Howard, R.S. Infection-associated encephalopathies: their investigation, diagnosis, and treatment. J Neurol . 2006 ; 253 : 833–845 | | | Nevertheless, defining the clinical features that should prompt the suspicion of acute encephalitis of childhood is essential in order to achieve prompt recognition, investigation and management because

2012 British Infection Association

109. Patellofemoral Pain

- toms can recur and can persist for years. 74 Patients with PFP symptoms frequently present to health care professionals for diagnosis and treatment. 74,277 This CPG will allow physical therapists and other rehabilitation specialists to stay up to date with evolving PFP knowledge and practices, and help them to make evidence-based treatment decisions. 166 Content experts were appointed by the Academy of Ortho- paedic Physical Therapy, APTA, Inc to conduct a review of the literature and to develop (...) evidence A preponderance of evidence from animal or cadaver studies, from conceptual models/ principles, or from basic science/bench research supports this recommendation F Expert opinion Best practice based on the clinical experi- ence of the guidelines development team supports this recommendation DESCRIPTION OF GUIDELINE VALIDATION Identified reviewers who are experts in PFP management and rehabilitation reviewed this CPG content and methods for in- tegrity and accuracy and to ensure that they fully

2019 The Orthopaedic Section of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA), Inc.

111. Guidelines for enhanced recovery after lung surgery: recommendations of the Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) Society and the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) Full Text available with Trip Pro

nutrition may have a role in the malnourished patient postoperatively Low Weak Smoking cessation Smoking should be stopped at least 4 weeks before surgery High Strong Alcohol dependency management Alcohol consumption (in alcohol abusers) should be avoided for at least 4 weeks before surgery Moderate Strong Anaemia management Anaemia should be identified, investigated and corrected preoperatively High Strong Pulmonary rehabilitation and prehabilitation Prehabilitation should be considered for patients (...) at least 4 weeks before surgery High Strong Alcohol dependency management Alcohol consumption (in alcohol abusers) should be avoided for at least 4 weeks before surgery Moderate Strong Anaemia management Anaemia should be identified, investigated and corrected preoperatively High Strong Pulmonary rehabilitation and prehabilitation Prehabilitation should be considered for patients with borderline lung function or exercise capacity Low Strong Admission Preoperative fasting and carbohydrate treatment

2020 ERAS Society

112. Perioperative

Harder, PhD Human Factors Perioperative Opioid Management Subgroup Members Allina Health Justin Hora, PharmD Pharmacy Entira Family Clinics David Thorson, MD Family Medicine/Sports Medicine Essentia Health Joseph Bianco, MD Internal Medicine Mark Grimm, MD Anesthesiology HealthPartners Anne Pylkas, MD Internal Medicine/ Addiction Medicine Isaac Marsolek, MD Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Rebekah Roemer, PharmD, BCPS Pharmacy Hennepin Healthcare Charles Reznikoff, MD Internal Medicine/ Addiction

2020 Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement

114. Clinical practice guideline for evaluation of psychosocial factors influencing recovery from adult orthopaedic trauma

by the Major Extremity Trauma and Rehabilitation Consortium (METRC) in collaboration with the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) 9400 W Higgins Rosemont, IL First Edition Copyright 2019 by the Major Extremity Trauma and Rehabilitation Consortium (METRC) and the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS)3 View background material via the PRF CPG eAppendix To View All AAOS and AAOS-Endorsed Evidence-Based clinical practice guidelines and Appropriate Use Criteria in a User-Friendly Format (...) and Rehabilitation Ann Marie Warren, PhD, ABPP Trauma Researcher Todd Swenning, MD, FAAOS Orthopaedic Trauma Association Kelly Cozza, MD American Psychiatric Association David Benedek, MD American Psychiatric Association Wade Gordon, MD, FAAOS Orthopaedic Trauma Association Saloni Sharma, MD American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Peggy Naas, MD, MBA, FAAOS American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons David Ring, MD, FAAOS Orthopaedic Trauma Association Non-Voting Members 1. Atul Kamath, MD, FAAOS

2020 American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

115. Clinical Practice Guideline on Preventing Venous Thromboembolic Disease in Patients Undergoing Elective Hip and Knee Arthroplasty

Results 137 Neuraxial Anesthesia Summary Table 140 Regional vs. General Anesthesia - VTED-related Outcomes 141 Epidural vs. General Anesthesia - Intraoperative Blood Loss 146 Epidural vs. General Anesthesia - Postoperative Blood Loss 147 Epidural vs. General Anesthesia - Other Outcomes 148 General + Epidural vs. General Anesthesia - Results 149 General + Lumbar Plexus Block vs. General Anesthesia - Results 150 Epidural vs. Spinal Anesthesia - Blood Loss 151 IVC Filter Summary Table 153 IVC Filter (...) role. 9. We suggest the use of neuraxial (such as intrathecal, epidural, and spinal) anesthesia for patients undergoing elective hip or knee arthroplasty to help limit blood loss, even though evidence suggests that neuraxial anesthesia does not affect the occurrence of venous thromboembolic disease. Grade of Recommendation: Moderate Description: Evidence from two or more “Moderate” strength studies with consistent findings, or evidence from a single “High” quality study for recommending

2011 American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

116. The treatment of distal radius fractures

in peer review of this clinical practice guideline: American Academy of Family Physicians American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation American Association for Hand Surgery American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine American Society for Surgery of the Hand American Society of Plastic Surgeons Individuals who participated in the peer review of this document and gave their consent to be listed as reviewers of this document are: Blair C. Filler, MD M. Felix Freshwater, MD

2009 American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

117. Clinical Practice Guideline on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Osteochondritis Dissecans

of Orthopaedics Rehabilitation University of Rochester 601 Elmwood Avenue Rochester, NY 14642 Guidelines and Technology Oversight Chair William C. Watters III MD 6624 Fannin #2600 Houston, TX 77030 Guidelines and Technology Oversight Vice-Chair Michael J. Goldberg, MD Seattle Children’s Hospital 4800 Sand Point Way NE Seattle, WA 98105 Evidence Based Practice Committee Chair Michael W. Keith, MD 2500 Metro Health Drive Cleveland, OH 44109-1900 AAOS Staff: Charles M. Turkelson, PhD Director of Research

2010 American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

119. The Diagnosis and Acute Management of Childhood Stroke, Clinical Guideline

Ability to provide acute monitoring up to 72 hours Dedicated stroke coordinator position / ? Dedicated medical lead / ? Access to ICU Rapid TIA assessment services Provision of telehealth services for acute assessment and treatment. optional optional Coordination with rehabilitation service providers Early assessment using standardised tools to determine individual rehabilitation needs and goals. Routine involvement of carers in rehabilitation process Routine use of guidelines, care plans

2017 Stroke Foundation - Australia

120. Management of Stroke in Neonates and Children Full Text available with Trip Pro

, neonates with cardiac disease may have a higher recurrence risk, similar to older infants and children with cardiac disease. Rehabilitation An early intervention program based on best available evidence of interventions that work in older children, Goals Activity Motor Enrichment, was evaluated in infants in a single randomized trial with promising results showing improved motor outcomes of participants compared with standard care. Another study explored the effectiveness of baby constraint-induced (...) healthy children in the vast majority of cases. , Presenting signs and symptoms include localizing deficits referable to the posterior circulation in 70% to 100%: hemiparesis, ataxia, dysarthria, visual field deficits, and oculomotor deficits. Nonlocalizing symptoms occur in 60% to 70%, especially headache, vomiting, and altered mental status. Vertebral artery (VA) dissection is the most common underlying cause (25%–50%), especially in younger boys, and is frequently preceded by recent minor head

2019 American Heart Association

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