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41. Guidance on competencies for spinal cord stimulation

Guidance on competencies for spinal cord stimulation Contents Introduction A: Core competencies for practitioners in Pain Medicine Appendix A: Curriculum B: Competencies for practitioners in Pain Medicine who are providers in an SCS service Appendix B: Curriculum Guidance on competencies for Spinal Cord Stimulation Reviewed 2016 Page 2 4 5 6 8 Endorsed by: Introduction Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been used for more than 40 years for a variety of conditions including pain (...) appropriate training because a basic standard of surgical expertise is mandatory for SCS to be carried out safely and for complications to be managed. More advanced skills are required if the pain physician performs the definitive implant procedure. Any physician involved in implanting SCS must have skills in patient selection, implantation, follow up and detection/ management of complications e.g. infection and neural compromise. After care: Emergency full spine MRI scanning must be available

2016 Faculty of Pain Medicine

42. Guidelines for the prescription of a seated wheelchair or mobility scooter for people with a traumatic brain injury or spinal cord injury

Rehabilitation Centre Adrian Byak Physiotherapist Spinal Cord Injury Assistive Technology Seating Service Northern Sydney Central Coast Health Service Private Practice Danielle Collins Senior Occupational Therapist Spinal Cord Injury Prince of Wales Hospital Spinal Unit Allie Di Marco Occupational Therapist Spinal Cord Injury Private practice Linda Elliott Statewide Equipment Advisor EnableNSW Health Support Services NSW Health Bill Fisher Rehabilitation Engineer Assistive Technology Seating Service Northern (...) Sydney Central Coast Health Service Kate Hopman Senior Occupational Therapist Traumatic Brain Injury Liverpool Hospital Brain Injury Rehabilitation Unit Greg Killeen Spinal cord injury consumer representative Suzanne Lulham Director, Service Delivery Lifetime Care & Support Authority Jodie Nicholls Senior Occupational Therapist Brain Injury Westmead Brain Injury Rehabilitation Unit Representative of Occupational Therapy Australia – NSW Division Thi Hong Nguyen Brain injury consumer representative

2011 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

43. Guidance on competencies for spinal cord stimulation

Guidance on competencies for spinal cord stimulation Contents Introduction A: Core competencies for practitioners in Pain Medicine Appendix A: Curriculum B: Competencies for practitioners in Pain Medicine who are providers in an SCS service Appendix B: Curriculum Guidance on competencies for Spinal Cord Stimulation Page 2 4 5 6 8 Endorsed by: Introduction Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been used for more than 40 years for a variety of conditions including pain and cardiovascular problems (...) training because a basic standard of surgical expertise is mandatory for SCS to be carried out safely and for complications to be managed. More advanced skills are required if the pain physician performs the definitive implant procedure. Any physician involved in implanting SCS must have skills in patient selection, implantation, follow up and detection/ management of complications e.g. infection and neural compromise. After care: Emergency full spine MRI scanning must be available. Arrangements must

2011 Royal College of Anaesthetists

44. Evidence-based guideline for neuropathic pain interventional treatments: Spinal cord stimulation, intravenous infusions, epidural injections and nerve blocks

. Procedural intervention guideline. Newcastle, Australia: Hunter Integrated Pain Service; 2009. < > (Accessed February 16, 2009). [ ] 12. North American Spine Society . Diagnosis and treatment of degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis. Burr Ridge: USA: North American Spine Society; 2007. < > (Accessed November 2, 2011). [ ] 13. Cruccu G, Aziz TZ, Garcia-Larrea L, Hansson P, et al. EFNS guidelines on neurostimulation therapy for neuropathic pain. Eur J Neurol. 2007; 14 :952–70. [ ] [ ] 14. Institute of Health (...) in PHN ( ) and was considered inadequate evidence to furnish any recommendation. The reviewed studies reported on a multiplicity of IV infusions and for different neuropathic conditions (CRPS, PHN, peripheral nerve injury, painful diabetic neuropathy, phantom limb pain, spinal cord injury, lumbar radicular pain and spinal stenosis). IV lidocaine: In patients with neuropathic pain, who have not derived sufficient benefit from pharmacological treatment, clinicians may consider a trial of IV lidocaine

2012 CPG Infobase

46. Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) for gastrointestinal surgery, part 1: pathophysiological considerations Full Text available with Trip Pro

hyperalgesia). These pro‐inflammatory substances and the release of substance P and calcitonin gene‐related peptide from the peripheral branches of nociceptors also sensitise silent Aδ nociceptors in the adjacent non‐injured tissues (secondary hyperalgesia). Repeated and prolonged stimulation of peripheral nociceptors in the injured area and in the surrounding non‐injured tissues lead to an increase firing of neurons at the level of the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, mediated by the activation of Na (...) ‐methyl‐D‐aspartate (NMDA) receptors (central sensitisation). Clinically, these pathophysiological changes could manifest with hyperalgesia, allodynia, and even persistent postsurgical pain. Descending sympathetic inhibitory pathways also play an important role at the level of the spinal cord by modulating transmission of noxious inputs. The response to nociception contributes to activate and potentiate the stress response associated with surgery. Activation of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis

2015 ERAS Society

47. Guidelines for perioperative care after radical cystectomy for bladder cancer: Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) Society Recommendations

for cystectomy. Keywords: , , , Abbreviation: ( ), ( ), ( ) 1. Introduction Enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) protocols have been introduced to reduce surgical stress and facilitate postoperative recovery. x 1 Kehlet, H. Multimodal approach to control postoperative pathophysiology and rehabilitation. British Journal of Anaesthesia . 1997 May ; 78 : 606–617 | | | In colorectal surgery, meta-analyses have provided level 1 evidence (LE) for reduction of complications (−50%) and hospital stay (−2.5 days (...) - and postoperative ERAS items” ( Table 1 ). Electronic links to related articles and references of selected articles were hand-searched. Eligible articles included meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or prospective case series including a control group published between January 1997 – 1st landmark study on ERAS published x 1 Kehlet, H. Multimodal approach to control postoperative pathophysiology and rehabilitation. British Journal of Anaesthesia . 1997 May ; 78 : 606–617 | | | – and April 2012

2013 ERAS Society

49. Guidelines for Perioperative Care in Elective Colonic Surgery: Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) Society Recommendations

) can be unpredictable, and is difficult to facilitate effectively for patients being admitted on the day of surgery, so is best avoided. If necessary, short-acting anaesthetic drugs (e.g., fentanyl combined with small incremental doses of midazolam or propofol) can be administered under monitoring to facilitate regional anaesthetic procedures such as spinal anaesthesia or thoracic epidural placement before the induction of anaesthesia with minimal residual effect at the end of surgery. Summary (...) and recommendation : Patients should not routinely receive long- or short-acting sedative medication before surgery because it delays immediate postoperative recovery. If necessary, short-acting intravenous drugs can be titrated carefully by the anaesthetist to facilitate the safe administration of epidural or spinal analgesia because these do not significantly affect recovery. Evidence level : Sedative medication : High Recommendation grade : Strong 3.6. Prophylaxis against thromboembolism The incidence

2012 ERAS Society

51. Treatment of Fecal Incontinence

included “fecal incontinence” anD [“fecal oR anal oR stool”], anD [“physical therapy oR rehabilitation oR biofeedback”], anD [“sphincteroplasty” oR “implants” oR “bowel sphincter” oR “artificial sphincter” oR “ra- diofrequency” oR “sacral nerve stimulation” oR “inject- able”]. Directed searches of the embedded references from The American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons’ Clinical Practice Guideline for the Treatment of Fecal Incontinence Ian M. Paquette, M.D.• Madhulika G. Varma, M.D.• Andreas M (...) constipation with overflow in- continence, or in patients secondarily constipated because of the use of antidiarrheal medication. 1,76,77 Biofeedback 1. Biofeedback should be considered as an initial treat- ment for patients with incontinence and some pre- served voluntary sphincter contraction. Grade of Recommendation: Strong recommendation based on moderate-quality evidence, 1B. Biofeedback training or pelvic floor rehabilitation is noninvasive and hence considered a first-line treatment option

2015 American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons

52. Clinical Practice Guideline on Prevention of Orthopaedic Implant in Patients Undergoing Dental Procedures

Association Canadian Dental Association Centers for Disease Control and Prevention College of American Pathologists Lumbar Spine Research Society North American Spine Society Society of Infectious Diseases Pharmacists The Infectious Diseases Society of America Participation in the AAOS peer review process does not constitute an endorsement of this guideline by the participating organization. AAOS Clinical Practice Guideline Unit ix v0.2 2.2.2012 Table of Contents Summary of Recommendations iii Terminology (...) of Orthopaedic Surgeons & Congress of Neurological Surgeons Paul A. Anderson, MD Professor Department of Orthopedics & Rehabilitation University of Wisconsin K4/735 600 Highland Avenue Madison WI 53792 American Dental Association Elliot Abt, DDS 4709 Golf Road, Suite 1005 Skokie, IL 60076 American Dental Association Harry C. Futrell, DMD 330 W 23rd Street, Suite J Panama City, FL 32405 American Dental Association Stephen O. Glenn, DDS 5319 S Lewis Avenue, Suite 222 Tulsa, OK 74105-6543 American Dental

2012 American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

53. Clinical Practice Guideline on Preventing Venous Thromboembolic Disease in Patients Undergoing Elective Hip and Knee Arthroplasty

Results 137 Neuraxial Anesthesia Summary Table 140 Regional vs. General Anesthesia - VTED-related Outcomes 141 Epidural vs. General Anesthesia - Intraoperative Blood Loss 146 Epidural vs. General Anesthesia - Postoperative Blood Loss 147 Epidural vs. General Anesthesia - Other Outcomes 148 General + Epidural vs. General Anesthesia - Results 149 General + Lumbar Plexus Block vs. General Anesthesia - Results 150 Epidural vs. Spinal Anesthesia - Blood Loss 151 IVC Filter Summary Table 153 IVC Filter (...) role. 9. We suggest the use of neuraxial (such as intrathecal, epidural, and spinal) anesthesia for patients undergoing elective hip or knee arthroplasty to help limit blood loss, even though evidence suggests that neuraxial anesthesia does not affect the occurrence of venous thromboembolic disease. Grade of Recommendation: Moderate Description: Evidence from two or more “Moderate” strength studies with consistent findings, or evidence from a single “High” quality study for recommending

2011 American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

55. Enhanced Recovery

However, inherent biases in the study design, lack of control group or randomization of participants, small sample sizes, wide variances in com- pliance with protocols, and limited generalizability limited these studies. When looking at postoperative quality out- comes, small, single-center studies report no differences in postoperative complication rates and hospital length of stay with prehabilitation compared with control subjects or postoperative rehabilitation 103,106,109 or results have been

2017 American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons

56. Clinical Practice Guideline on the Treatment of Pediatric Diaphyseal Femur Fractures

Children's Hospital One Children's Pl Ste 4S 20 Saint Louis, MO 63110 Charles T. Mehlman, DO, MPH Children's Hospital Medical Center 3333 Burnet Avenue, MLC 2017 Cincinnati, Ohio 45229-3039 David M. Scher, MD Hospital for Special Surgery 535 E 70th St 5th Fl New York, NY 10021 Travis Matheney, MD Children's Hospital Boston Orthopedic Surgery 47 Joy Street Boston, MA 02115 James O Sanders, MD Department of Orthopaedics Rehabilitation University of Rochester 601 Elmwood Avenue Rochester NY 14642 Guidelines (...) to consider when calculating the overall cost of treatment for pediatric femoral fracture. 5 The main considerations for patients and third party payers are the relative cost and effectiveness of each treatment option. But hidden costs for pediatric patients must also be considered. These costs include the additional home care required for a patient, the costs of rehabilitation and of missed school for the patient, child care costs if both parents work, and time off of work required by one or both parents

2015 American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

57. Managing Chronic Non-Terminal Pain in Adults Including Prescribing Controlled Substances

Managing Chronic Non-Terminal Pain in Adults Including Prescribing Controlled Substances 1 Quality Department Guidelines for Clinical Care Ambulatory Chronic Pain Management Guideline Team Team Leads Daniel W Berland, MD General Medicine / Anesthesiology Phillip E Rodgers, MD Family Medicine Team Members Carmen R Green, MD Anesthesiology R Van Harrison, PhD Medical Education Randy S Roth, PhD Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Consultants Daniel J. Clauw, MD Rheumatology Jennifer A. Meddings (...) Checklist for Patients with Chronic Pain Initial Visit (See outline in Appendix A) Assessment Detailed pain history: quality, location, radiating patterns, exacerbating factors, associated injuries/events at original onset Pain treatment history: consultants seen, interventions or surgeries performed, medications tried and their perceived effectiveness, rehabilitation therapy completed, reasons for leaving previous providers Complete psychosocial history: psychiatric evaluations and/or diagnoses, family

2017 University of Michigan Health System

58. Asymptomatic Bacteriuria

, Canada Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) is a common finding in many populations, including healthy women and persons with underly- ing urologic abnormalities. The 2005 guideline from the Infectious Diseases Society of America recommended that ASB should be screened for and treated only in pregnant women or in an individual prior to undergoing invasive urologic procedures. Treatment was not recommended for healthy women; older women or men; or persons with diabetes, indwelling catheters, or spinal cord (...) of the 2005 guideline, includes new recommendations for populations not previously addressed, and, where relevant, addresses the interpretation of nonlocalizing clinical symptoms in populations with a high prevalence of ASB. Keywords. asymptomatic bacteriuria; bacteriuria; urinary tract infection; pyelonephritis; cystitis; diabetes; pregnancy; renal transplant; endourologic surgery; urologic devices; urinary catheter; older adults; nursing home; long-term care; spinal cord injury; neurogenic bladder

2019 Infectious Diseases Society of America

60. Neuro-urology

of botulinum toxin A injections in spinal cord injury patients with detrusor overactivity and detrusor sphincter dyssynergia. J Rehab Med, 2016. 48: 683. 253. Utomo, E., et al. Surgical management of functional bladder outlet obstruction in adults with neurogenic bladder dysfunction. Cochrane Database Syst Rev, 2014. 5: CD004927. 254. Chancellor, M.B., et al. Prospective comparison of external sphincter balloon dilatation and prosthesis placement with external sphincterotomy in spinal cord injured men (...) analysis of sacral anterior root stimulation for rehabilitation of bladder dysfunction in spinal cord injured patients. Neurosurgery, 2013. 73: 600. 312. Martens, F.M., et al. Quality of life in complete spinal cord injury patients with a Brindley bladder stimulator compared to a matched control group. Neurourol Urodyn, 2011. 30: 551. 313. Krebs, J

2019 European Association of Urology

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