How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

456 results for

spine rehabilitation

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

21. Cervical Spine Collar Clearance in the Obtunded Adult Blunt Trauma Patient

, bone misalignment (subluxations, listhesis, interspinous widening, or splaying), or single-level ligamentous injury involving all three columns. A priori, our committee consensus of clinical judgment was that a 3 of 1,000 rate (0.3%) was an upper acceptable limit for a missed unstable C-spine injury. Spinal cord injuries included spinal epidural hematomas, subdural hematomas, cord edema, or cord contusions. Nonligamentous soft tissue injury was captured, when specified. If discrepancies existed (...) significance in the classification of acute thoracolumbar spinal injuries. In: Banaszkiewicz PA, Kader DF. , eds. Classic Papers in Orthopaedics. London, England: Springer Link; 2013; : 289–292. Denis F. The three column spine and its significance in the classification of acute thoracolumbar spinal injuries. Spine. 1983; 8: 817–831. Whiting PF, Rutjes AWS, Westwood ME, Mallett S, Deeks JJ, Reitsma JB, Leeflang MMG, Sterne JAC, Bossuyt PMM. and QUADAS-2 Group. QUADAS-2: a revised tool for the quality

2015 Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma

22. Interventional Spine and Pain Procedures in Patients on Antiplatelet and Anticoagulant Medications

varies based on anatomical level with the posterior epidural space measuring approximately 0.4 mm at C7 to T1, 7.5 mm in the upper thoracic spine, 4.1 mm at the T11 to T12, and 4 to 7 mm in the lumbar regions. The epidural space has extensive thin-walled valveless venous plexi (plexus venous vertebralis interior, anterior, and posterior), which are vulnerable to damage during needle puncture and advancement of spinal cord stimulator leads and epidural and intrathecal catheters. These epidural veins (...) of the respondents (98%) followed ASRA guidelines for anticoagulants but not for antiplatelet agents. Two-thirds of the participants (67%) had separate protocols regarding aspirin [acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)] or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Moreover, 55% stopped ASA before spinal cord stimulation (SCS) trials and implants, and 32% stopped ASA before epidural steroid injections (ESIs). However, 17% admitted that they used different protocols for cervical spine injections as compared with lumbar

2015 American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine

23. Evidence-Based Clinical Guidelines for Multidisciplinary Spine Care: Diagnosis and Treatment of Low Back Pain

Society of Spine Radiology (ASSR) Medical & Psychological Treatment Section Section Chair: Christopher M. Bono, MD Authors: Paul Dougherty, DC Gazanfar Rahmathulla, MD, MBBS Christopher K. Taleghani, MD Terry Trammell, MD Randall P. Brewer, MD; Stakeholder Representative, American Academy of Pain Medicine (AAPM) Ravi Prasad, PhD; Stakeholder Representative, American Academy of Pain Medicine (AAPM) Contributor: John P. Birkedal, MD Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Section Section Chair: Charles (...) for adult patients suffering with spinal disorders, NASS is committed to multidisciplinary involvement in the process of guideline development. To this end, NASS has ensured that representatives from research, both operative and non-operative, medical, interventional and surgical spine specialties have participated in the development and review of NASS guidelines. To en- sure broad-based representation on this topic, NASS invited representatives from organizations whose members are involved in the care

2020 American Academy of Pain Medicine

24. Diagnosis and Treatment of Lumbar Disc Herniation with Radiculopathy

for symptomatic lumbar disc herniation with radiculopathy as reflected in the highest quality clinical lit - erature available on this subject as of July 2011. The goals of the guideline recommendations are to assist in delivering optimum, efficacious treatment and functional recovery from this spinal disorder. Scope, Purpose and Intended User This document was developed by the North American Spine So - ciety Evidence-based Guideline Development Committee as an educational tool to assist practitioners who (...) outcomes of surgical and nonsurgi- cal management of sciatica. Spine (Phila Pa 1976). Aug 1 1996;21(15):1777-1786. 3. Atlas SJ, Deyo RA, Keller RB, et al. The Maine Lumbar Spine Study, Part III. 1-year outcomes of surgical and nonsurgical management of lumbar spinal stenosis. Spine (Phila Pa 1976). Aug 1 1996;21(15):1787-1794; discussion 1794-1785. 4. Atlas SJ, Keller RB, Chang Y , Deyo RA, Singer DE. Surgical and nonsurgical management of sciatica secondary to a lumbar disc herniation: five-year

2012 North American Spine Society

25. Lumbar Fusion Guideline (arthrodesis)

vertebral level. What is expected of you if you proceed to have a lumbar fusion: If the Department authorizes your surgery, I will continue to see you at least every two months for six months after the surgery. Both prior to and following surgery, I expect you to actively participate in your recovery and rehabilitation plan. After you have had the fusion and have completed the recommended post-operative rehabilitation treatment, if there are no new objective neurologic signs (problems) or evidence (...) and patients who are nonsmokeres: a comparison study. Spine 1986;11:942-943. 2. Jenkins LT, Jones AL, Harms JJ. Prognostic factors in lumbar spinal fusion. Contemp Orthop 1994;29(3):173-180. 3. Franklin GM, Haug J, Heyer NJ, McKeefrey SP, Picciano JF. Outcome of lumbar fusion in Washington State workers' compensation. Spine 1994;19(17):1897-1904. 4. Juratli SM, Franklin GM, Mirza SK, Wickizer TM, Fulton-Kehoe D. Lumbar fusion outcomes in Washington State workers' compensation. Spine 2006;31(23):2715- 2723

2016 Washington State Department of Labor and Industries

26. Consensus Practice Guidelines on Interventions for Lumbar Facet Joint Pain

confirmation, which is potentially problematic at upper lumbar vertebrae. For example, a study performed in the thoracic spine found that misidentifica- tion of the targeted spinal level occurred between 16% and 43% of the time depending on the scanning technique, with IA at 6 weeks and 3 months Differences favoring MBB non- significant at 6 months. Cohen et al 134 Case- control 511 who under MBB (n=212), IA (n=212) or MBB and IA (n=87) before RFA MBB with 0.5–0.75 mL LA or IA with 0.5–1 mL LA+steroid MBB (...) of the seven Revel’s criteria (above) including pain reduction by recumbency resulted in 92% sensitivity and 80% specificity. Manchikanti et al 50 Prospective n=120 =75% pain reduction MBB (double comparative diagnostic blocks) The prevalence of clinical findings (pain better by sitting/lying, pain worsened by sitting/standing/walking/coughing/lumbar spine range of motion, positive straight leg raising test and pain referral pattern) were similar between positive and negative block groups. Back pain

2020 American Academy of Pain Medicine

27. Consensus Practice Guidelines on Interventions for Lumbar Facet Joint Pain from a Multispecialty, International Working Group Full Text available with Trip Pro

of treatment is a source of contention and scientific debate. Regarding prevalence, the cited frequency of lumbar facet joint pain ranges from as low as 4.8% in the multicenter National Low Back Pain Survey evaluating final diagnoses of 2374 patients with low back pain (LBP) referred to an orthopedic or neurosurgical spine surgeon, to over 50% in systematic reviews on prevalence studies using varying criteria for diagnostic blocks performed by interventional pain physicians. The wide disparity in reported (...) regulatory agencies and payers. The Spine Intervention Society (SIS; formerly the International Spine Intervention Society) has published guidelines on the performance of lumbar facet blocks and radiofrequency (RF) neurotomy, but these rigorous criteria have not been followed in recent randomized controlled trials (RCTs), and are not adhered to in domestic and international guidelines. Whereas stringent selection criteria have been anecdotally associated with high RFA success rates, the increased false

2020 American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine

28. Metastatic spinal cord compression in adults: diagnosis and management

information (for example, in the form of a leaflet) to patients and their families and carers which explains the symptoms of MSCC, and advises them (and their healthcare professionals) what to do if they develop these symptoms. Contact the MSCC coordinator urgently (within 24 hours) to discuss the care of patients with cancer and any of the following symptoms suggestive of spinal metastases: pain in the middle (thoracic) or upper (cervical) spine progressive lower (lumbar) spinal pain severe unremitting (...) Early symptoms and signs Early symptoms and signs 1.3.2.1 Contact the MSCC coordinator urgently (within 24 hours) to discuss the care of patients with cancer and any of the following symptoms suggestive of spinal metastases: pain in the middle (thoracic) or upper (cervical) spine progressive lower (lumbar) spinal pain severe unremitting lower spinal pain spinal pain aggravated by straining (for example, at stool, or when coughing or sneezing) localised spinal tenderness Metastatic spinal cord

2008 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

29. Spinal Injections Coverage Decision

and/or anesthetic into the spine or space around the spinal nerves and joints. This coverage decision describes the purpose of each type of injection and addresses the criteria required for authorization. The criteria for allowing these injections are based on L&I’s Medical Aid Rules (WACs) and decisions of the statutory Health Technology Clinical Committee (HTCC). Decisions of the HTCC are mandatory for state agencies. Hyperlinks to the basis for these decisions are in a coverage table at the end (...) are covered. 3 ESI language corrected September 2018; Hyperlinks to evidence resources added May 2018. Facet Injections Injections directly into the facet joint are ineffective at relieving pain and have no role in diagnosing conditions; hence, both therapeutic and diagnostic facet injections are not covered. Epidural Injections With epidural injections, substances are injected within the spine but outside the spinal canal. Depending on what is injected, they can be done as part of a diagnostic imaging

2019 Washington State Department of Labor and Industries

30. An Update of Comprehensive Evidence-Based Guidelines for Interventional Techniques in Chronic Spinal Pain - Part 1 - Introduction and General Considerations

, systematic reviews, meta-analysis, interventional pain management, evidence synthesis, methodological quality assessment, clinical relevance, recommendations. Pain Physician 2013; 16:S1-S48 Guidelines An Update of Comprehensive Evidence-Based Guidelines for Interventional Techniques in Chronic Spinal Pain. Part I: Introduction and General Considerations From: 1 Pain Management Center of Paducah, Paducah, KY, and University of Louisville, Louisville, KY; 2 Mid Atlantic Spine & Pain Physicians of Newark (...) . This was associated with a 65% increase in expenditures; a 49% increase in the number of patients seeking spine-related care from 1997 through 2006 was the biggest contributor to the increase in expenditures. Rates of imaging, interven- tional techniques, drug use, chiropractic, physical thera- py, alternative complementary therapy, and surgery for spine problems have increased substantially over the past decade (46,47,54,79-93,147-212). Spinal interven- tional techniques are thus considered one of the major

2013 American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians

31. Nutritional Support After Spinal Cord Injury Full Text available with Trip Pro

following injury with resultant increased susceptibility for infection, impaired wound healing, and difficulty weaning from mechanical ventilation. – , These factors added to the inherent immobility, denervation, and muscle atrophy associated with spinal cord injury provide the rationale for nutritional support of spinal cord injured patients following trauma. The guidelines author group of the Joint Section on Disorders of the Spine and Peripheral Nerves of the American Association of Neurological (...) , and nutritional status in spinal cord injury patients . Exp Mol Pathol . 2000 ; 68 ( 1 ): 38 – 54 . 11. Nutritional support after spinal cord injury. In: Guidelines for the management of acute cervical spine and spinal cord injuries . Neurosurgery . 2002 ; 50 ( 3 suppl): S81 – S84 . 12. Hadley MN , Grahm TW , Harrington T , Schiller WR , McDermott MK , Posillico DB Nutritional support and neurotrauma: A critical review of early nutrition in forty-five acute head injury patients . Neurosurgery . 1986 ; 19 ( 3

2013 Congress of Neurological Surgeons

32. Deep Venous Thrombosis and Thromboembolism in Patients With Cervical Spinal Cord Injuries

encountered in patients who have sustained cervical spinal cord injuries. Several means of prophylaxis and treatment are available, including anticoagulation, pneumatic compression devices, and vena cava filters. In 2002, the guidelines author group of the Joint Section on Disorders of the Spine and Peripheral Nerves of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) and the Congress of Neurological Surgeons (CNS) produced a medical evidence-based guideline on this important topic. The purpose (...) and 28 days after injury. Remarkably, none of the delayed admission group patients were prophylactically treated with sequential compression devices prior to admission. These authors provide Class II medical evidence that the early application of both chemical and mechanical prophylaxis reduces the incidence of DVT in patients with acute SCI. In 2009, Ploumis et al surveyed 25 spine surgeons to obtain a consensus on the use of pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis following spinal injury. The consensus

2013 Congress of Neurological Surgeons

33. Treatment of Subaxial Cervical Spinal Injuries Full Text available with Trip Pro

of patients who presented with a delayed diagnosis and neurological deterioration. SUMMARY Subaxial cervical spine fractures and dislocations encompass a broad spectrum of acute traumatic injuries. Adequate decompression of the neural elements and the restoration of sufficient spinal stability to allow early mobilization and rehabilitation remain basic treatment tenets. Although nonsurgical treatment can be employed successfully, surgical treatment of these injuries achieves these goals more consistently (...) immobilization by either internal fixation or external immobilization to allow for early patient mobilization and rehabilitation is recommended. If surgical treatment is considered, either anterior or posterior fixation and fusion is acceptable in patients not requiring a particular surgical approach for decompression of the spinal cord. Treatment of subaxial cervical fractures and dislocations with prolonged bed rest in traction is recommended if more contemporary treatment options are not available

2013 Congress of Neurological Surgeons

34. Pharmacological Therapy for Acute Spinal Cord Injury Full Text available with Trip Pro

March 2013 Article Contents Article Navigation Pharmacological Therapy for Acute Spinal Cord Injury R. John Hurlbert, MD, PhD, FRCSC * Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary Spine Program, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada Search for other works by this author on: Mark N. Hadley, MD ‡ Division of Neurological Surgery, † Correspondence: Mark N. Hadley, MD, FACS, UAB Division of Neurological Surgery, 510 –20 th Street South, FOT 1030, Birmingham (...) ) and in the rehabilitation unit ( P = .035). Overall, hospital stay was not different between the 2 groups, leading the authors to conclude that MP may predispose SCI patients to pneumonia, but had no adverse effect on long-term outcome. Poynton et al retrospectively identified 71 consecutive SCI patients admitted to their rehabilitation facility between June 1991 and December 1994. American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) motor and sensory scores were recorded at the time of injury, time of transfer

2013 Congress of Neurological Surgeons

35. Clinical Assessment Following Acute Cervical Spinal Cord Injury Full Text available with Trip Pro

to measure potential neurological improvement after therapy and, importantly, to determine its functional significance. Pain of the spinal cord, spinal column, or other orthopedic origin is often of clinical significance following acute SCI. Pain can be horribly debilitating, hindering patient performance and limiting functional abilities beyond that predicted by the patient's neurological deficits. These 3 topics (neurological assessment, functional outcome, and pain associated with SCI) are the focus (...) of this contemporary update on the Clinical Assessment Following Acute Spinal Cord Injury, previously produced and published by the Joint Section on Disorders of the Spine and Peripheral Nerves of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons and the Congress of Neurological Surgeons. SEARCH CRITERIA A computerized search of the database of the National Library of Medicine (PubMed) of the literature published from 1966 to 2011 was performed for each of the 3 subtopics reviewed in this guideline: neurological

2013 Congress of Neurological Surgeons

36. An Update of Comprehensive Evidence-Based Guidelines for Interventional Techniques in Chronic Spinal Pain - Part 2 - Guidance and Recommendations

An Update of Comprehensive Evidence-Based Guidelines for Interventional Techniques in Chronic Spinal Pain - Part 2 - Guidance and Recommendations Objective: To develop evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for interventional techniques in the diagnosis and treatment of chronic spinal pain. Methodology: Systematic assessment of the literature. Evidence: I. Lumbar Spine • The evidence for accuracy of diagnostic selective nerve root blocks is limited; whereas for lumbar provocation (...) disc decompression, and implantable therapies. V. MAnAGEMEnT of LoW BACK PAIn Low back pain is the most common of all spinal, and even chronic, pain problems. Lumbar intervertebral discs, facet joints, sacroiliac joints, ligaments, fascia, muscles, and nerve root dura have been shown to be capable of transmitting pain in the lumbar spine with resulting symptoms of low back pain and lower extrem- ity pain (8,10,11,13,17,33,36,374,551). Lumbar disc herniation and spinal stenosis are di- agnosed

2013 American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians

37. Guidance on competencies for spinal cord stimulation

Guidance on competencies for spinal cord stimulation Contents Introduction A: Core competencies for practitioners in Pain Medicine Appendix A: Curriculum B: Competencies for practitioners in Pain Medicine who are providers in an SCS service Appendix B: Curriculum Guidance on competencies for Spinal Cord Stimulation Reviewed 2016 Page 2 4 5 6 8 Endorsed by: Introduction Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been used for more than 40 years for a variety of conditions including pain (...) appropriate training because a basic standard of surgical expertise is mandatory for SCS to be carried out safely and for complications to be managed. More advanced skills are required if the pain physician performs the definitive implant procedure. Any physician involved in implanting SCS must have skills in patient selection, implantation, follow up and detection/ management of complications e.g. infection and neural compromise. After care: Emergency full spine MRI scanning must be available

2016 Faculty of Pain Medicine

38. Evidence-based guideline for neuropathic pain interventional treatments: Spinal cord stimulation, intravenous infusions, epidural injections and nerve blocks

. Procedural intervention guideline. Newcastle, Australia: Hunter Integrated Pain Service; 2009. < > (Accessed February 16, 2009). [ ] 12. North American Spine Society . Diagnosis and treatment of degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis. Burr Ridge: USA: North American Spine Society; 2007. < > (Accessed November 2, 2011). [ ] 13. Cruccu G, Aziz TZ, Garcia-Larrea L, Hansson P, et al. EFNS guidelines on neurostimulation therapy for neuropathic pain. Eur J Neurol. 2007; 14 :952–70. [ ] [ ] 14. Institute of Health (...) in PHN ( ) and was considered inadequate evidence to furnish any recommendation. The reviewed studies reported on a multiplicity of IV infusions and for different neuropathic conditions (CRPS, PHN, peripheral nerve injury, painful diabetic neuropathy, phantom limb pain, spinal cord injury, lumbar radicular pain and spinal stenosis). IV lidocaine: In patients with neuropathic pain, who have not derived sufficient benefit from pharmacological treatment, clinicians may consider a trial of IV lidocaine

2012 CPG Infobase

39. Guidelines for the prescription of a seated wheelchair or mobility scooter for people with a traumatic brain injury or spinal cord injury

Rehabilitation Centre Adrian Byak Physiotherapist Spinal Cord Injury Assistive Technology Seating Service Northern Sydney Central Coast Health Service Private Practice Danielle Collins Senior Occupational Therapist Spinal Cord Injury Prince of Wales Hospital Spinal Unit Allie Di Marco Occupational Therapist Spinal Cord Injury Private practice Linda Elliott Statewide Equipment Advisor EnableNSW Health Support Services NSW Health Bill Fisher Rehabilitation Engineer Assistive Technology Seating Service Northern (...) Sydney Central Coast Health Service Kate Hopman Senior Occupational Therapist Traumatic Brain Injury Liverpool Hospital Brain Injury Rehabilitation Unit Greg Killeen Spinal cord injury consumer representative Suzanne Lulham Director, Service Delivery Lifetime Care & Support Authority Jodie Nicholls Senior Occupational Therapist Brain Injury Westmead Brain Injury Rehabilitation Unit Representative of Occupational Therapy Australia – NSW Division Thi Hong Nguyen Brain injury consumer representative

2011 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

40. Guidance on competencies for spinal cord stimulation

Guidance on competencies for spinal cord stimulation Contents Introduction A: Core competencies for practitioners in Pain Medicine Appendix A: Curriculum B: Competencies for practitioners in Pain Medicine who are providers in an SCS service Appendix B: Curriculum Guidance on competencies for Spinal Cord Stimulation Page 2 4 5 6 8 Endorsed by: Introduction Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been used for more than 40 years for a variety of conditions including pain and cardiovascular problems (...) training because a basic standard of surgical expertise is mandatory for SCS to be carried out safely and for complications to be managed. More advanced skills are required if the pain physician performs the definitive implant procedure. Any physician involved in implanting SCS must have skills in patient selection, implantation, follow up and detection/ management of complications e.g. infection and neural compromise. After care: Emergency full spine MRI scanning must be available. Arrangements must

2011 Royal College of Anaesthetists

Guidelines

Guidelines – filter by country