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1. Guideline update for the performance of fusion procedures for degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. Part 7: Lumbar fusion for intractable low-back pain without stenosis or spondylolisthesis

: Predic- tive value of MRI vertebral end-plate signal changes (Modic) on outcome of surgically treated degenerative disc disease. Results of a cohort study including 60 patients. Neurochirur - gie 52:315–322, 2006 14. Fairbank J, Frost H, Wilson-MacDonald J, Yu LM, Barker K, Collins R, et al: Randomised controlled trial to compare surgical stabilization of the lumbar spine with an intensive rehabilitation programme for patients with chronic low back pain: the MRC spine stabilisation trial. BMJ 330 (...) for degenerative disease of the lumbar spine”). Grade B Lumbar fusion or a comprehensive rehabilitation pro- gram incorporating cognitive therapy are recommended as treatment alternatives for patients with chronic low- back pain that is refractory to traditional conservative treatment, such as physical therapy, and is due to 1- or 2-level degenerative disc disease without stenosis or spon- dylolisthesis (multiple Level II studies). It is recommended that lumbar fusion be performed for patients whose low-back

2014 Congress of Neurological Surgeons

2. Guideline update for the performance of fusion procedures for degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. Part 3: Assessment of economic outcome

of degenerative spine disease, with a focus on establishing clinical efficacy and cost-effectiveness. 31 Management of chronic degenerative spinal conditions in the United States is estimated to cost nearly $85 billion annually, with a significant percent - age attributed to the dramatic increase in the frequency of lumbar fusion procedures. 13,15,25 In 2004, more than 300,000 spinal fusions were performed in the US, ac- counting for more than $16 billion in hospital charges alone. 14 Advances in surgical (...) scores. The cost of using rhBMP-2 is comparable to the cost of autograft for lumbar fusion surgery pts. Glassman et al., 2008 IV 106 pts >60 yrs old randomized to either rhBMP-2 vs ICBG for anterior 1-level lumbar spine fusion. Outcomes & costs were assessed at 2 yrs. Total cost of care over 2 yrs was not significantly different ($42,574 for ICBG & $40,131 for rhBMP-2). Use of rhBMP-2 is as effective as ICBG for lumbar spinal fusion w/ similar costs. Alt et al., 2009 IV Using pooled clinical data

2014 Congress of Neurological Surgeons

3. Diagnosis and Treatment of Degenerative Lumbar Spinal Stenosis (Revised 2011)

JF. Inter- spinous process decompression with the X-STOP device for lumbar spinal stenosis: a 4-year follow-up study. J Spinal Disord Tech. Jul 2006;19(5):323-327. 31. Lin SI, Lin RM, Huang LW . Disability in patients with de- generative lumbar spinal stenosis. Arch Phys Med Rehab. Sep 2006;87(9):1250-1256. 32. Malmivaara A, Slatis P , Heliovaara M, et al. Surgical or non- operative treatment for lumbar spinal stenosis? A randomized controlled trial. Spine (Phila Pa 1976). Jan 1 2007;32(1):1-8 (...) or institution 1 IntroductIon /GuIdelIne MethodoloGy Degenerative Spinal Stenosis | NASS Clinical Guidelines NASS Evidence-Based Clinical Guidelines Committee Evidence-Based Clinical Guidelines for Multidisciplinary Spine Care Diagnosis and Treatment of Degenerative Lumbar Spinal Stenosis D. Scott Kreiner, MD Committee Co-Chair, Natural History Co-Chair William O. Shaffer, MD Committee Co-Chair, Natural History Co-Chair Jamie Baisden, MD Outcome Measures Chair Thomas Gilbert, MD Diagnosis/Imaging Chair

2011 North American Spine Society

4. Clinical practice guideline for the rehabilitation of adults with moderate to severe TBI - section 1: components of the optimal TBI rehabilitation system

with Modarate to Severe TBI 5 C Subacute Rehabilitation C1 – TBI Inpatient Rehabilitation Models C 1.1 Traumatic brain injury rehabilitation teams should have access to specialist professionals to provide consultation services, education and oversight, especially for individuals with multiple injuries and diagnoses (examples include expertise in amputee care or spinal cord injury). (Adapted from NZGG 2007, 5, p. 80) C 1.2 Interdisciplinary team conferences should occur regularly (at least every two weeks (...) Clinical practice guideline for the rehabilitation of adults with moderate to severe TBI - section 1: components of the optimal TBI rehabilitation system A1 – Principles for Organizing Rehabilitation Services A 1.1 Every individual with traumatic brain injury should have timely, specialized interdisciplinary rehabilitation services. (Adapted from ABIKUS 2007, G2, p. 16) A 1.2 Rehabilitation interventions should be initiated as soon as the condition of the person with traumatic brain injury

2016 CPG Infobase

5. Interventional Therapies, Surgery, and Interdisciplinary Rehabilitation for Low Back Pain

Interventional Therapies, Surgery, and Interdisciplinary Rehabilitation for Low Back Pain Interventional Therapies, Surgery, and Interdisciplinary Reh... : Spine You may be trying to access this site from a secured browser on the server. Please enable scripts and reload this page. Login No user account? Lippincott Journals Subscribers , use your username or email along with your password to log in. Remember me on this computer Register for a free account Registered users can save articles (...) ; **Department of Neurosurgery, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI; ††Department of Orthopedic Surgery , Stanford University, Stanford, CA; ‡‡Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Baylor College of Medicine, The Institute for Rehabilitation and Research, Houston, TX; §§Department of Community Health, Rhode Island Spine Center, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Pawtucket, RI; ¶¶Department of Neurosurgery, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI; ∥∥Department of Physical Medicine

2009 Publication 1228

6. The Subacute Rehabilitation of Childhood Stroke, Clinical Guideline

The Subacute Rehabilitation of Childhood Stroke, Clinical Guideline The Subacute Rehabilitation of Childhood Stroke CLINICAL GUIDELINE 2019 Victorian Subacute Childhood Stroke Advisory CommitteeVictorian Subacute Childhood Stroke Guidelines 2 The guideline for the subacute management of childhood stroke has been developed with: Suggested citation: Victorian Subacute Childhood Stroke Advisory Committee. Guideline for the subacute management of childhood stroke?—?2019. Copyright information (...) training is not recommended, unless in consultation with a relevant health professional. Despite the utmost care taken in developing this document the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute cannot accept any liability, including loss or damage resulting from use of content, or for its accuracy, currency and completeness. Funded by: Endorsed by: Victorian Subacute Childhood Stroke Guidelines 3 CONTENTS 1. Quick reference guide 6 2. Introduction 7 3. Methodology 8 4. Framework for providing rehabilitation

2017 Stroke Foundation - Australia

7. Brain injury rehabilitation in adults

Brain injury rehabilitation in adults SIGN 130 • Brain injury rehabilitation in adults A national clinical guideline March 2013 Evidence Help us to improve SIGN guidelines - click here to complete our survey KEY TO EVIDENCE STATEMENTS AND GRADES OF RECOMMENDATIONS LEVELS OF EVIDENCE 1 ++ High quality meta-analyses, systematic reviews of RCTs, or RCTs with a very low risk of bias 1 + Well conducted meta-analyses, systematic reviews, or RCTs with a low risk of bias 1 - Meta-analyses, systematic (...) , in the event of errors or omissions corrections will be published in the web version of this document, which is the definitive version at all times. This version can be found on our web site www.sign.ac.uk. This document is produced from elemental chlorine-free material and is sourced from sustainable forests.Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network Brain injury rehabilitation in adults A national clinical guideline March 2013Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network Gyle Square, 1 South Gyle Crescent

2013 SIGN

8. Rehabilitation in the wake of covid-19 - A phoenix from the ashes

patient to patient and will dictate the specific nature of the service required, but they fall broadly under six main headings: • Specialist rehab medical (RM) or neuropsychiatric needs, including management of unstable medical /psychiatric conditions • Specialist clinical rehabilitation needs (for physical, cognitive, emotional or behavioural management of patients and support for their families) • High intensity, and/or longer duration of rehabilitation programme • Specialist Vocational (...) for Patients with Highly Complex Needs ( all ages): D02. London2013 [cited 2014]; Available from: http://www.england.nhs.uk/wp- content/uploads/2014/04/d02-rehab-pat-high-needs-0414.pdf. 26. Specialist neuro-rehabilitation services: providing for patients with complex rehabilitation needs. London: British Society of Rehabilitation Medicine (2010). Updated 2015. 27. Rehabilitation for patients in the acute care pathway following severe disabling illness or injury: BSRM core standards for specialist

2020 British Society of Rehabilitation Medicine

9. Guidelines for adult stroke rehabilitation and recovery

Guidelines for adult stroke rehabilitation and recovery e1 Purpose—The aim of this guideline is to provide a synopsis of best clinical practices in the rehabilitative care of adults recovering from stroke. Methods—Writing group members were nominated by the committee chair on the basis of their previous work in relevant topic areas and were approved by the American Heart Association (AHA) Stroke Council’s Scientific Statement Oversight Committee and the AHA’s Manuscript Oversight Committee (...) Committee review before consideration and approval by the AHA Science Advisory and Coordinating Committee. Results—Stroke rehabilitation requires a sustained and coordinated effort from a large team, including the patient and his or her goals, family and friends, other caregivers (eg, personal care attendants), physicians, nurses, physical and occupational therapists, speech-language pathologists, recreation therapists, psychologists, nutritionists, social workers, and others. Communication

2016 American Academy of Neurology

10. The Management of Upper Extremity Amputation Rehabilitation (UEAR)

The Management of Upper Extremity Amputation Rehabilitation (UEAR) VA/DoD CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINE FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF UPPER EXTREMITY AMPUTATION REHABILITATION Department of Veterans Affairs Department of Defense QUALIFYING STATEMENTS The Department of Veterans Affairs and the Department of Defense guidelines are based upon the best information available at the time of publication. They are designed to provide information and assist decision making. They are not intended to define (...) testing and/or therapeutic interventions within these guidelines does not guarantee coverage of civilian sector care. Additional information on current TRICARE benefits may be found at www.tricare.mil or by contacting your regional TRICARE Managed Care Support Contractor. Version 1.0 – 2014 VA/DoD Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Upper Extremity Amputation Rehabilitation Page 2 of 149 Prepared by: The Management of Upper Extremity Amputation Rehabilitation Working Group

2014 VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guidelines

11. Management of Stroke Rehabilitation

, PhD; Elliot J. Roth, MD; Tim Shephard, RN, MSN: Canadian Best Practice Recommendations for Stroke Care (Update 2008) Guidelines 2006. These literature searches were conducted covering the period from January 2002 through March 2009 that using the terms Cerebrovascular Disorders and rehabilitation or rehab. Adding a stroke text word did not appear to be useful in that sensitivity was not enhanced but specificity was decreased. Electronic searches were supplemented by reference lists and additional (...) Management of Stroke Rehabilitation VA/DoD CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINE FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF STROKE REHABILITATION Department of Veterans Affairs Department of Defense And The American Hea rt Association/ American Stroke Association Prepared by: THE MANAGEMENT OF STROKE REHABILITATION Working Group With support from: The Office of Quality and Performance, VA, Washington, DC & Quality Management Division, United States Army MEDCOM QUALIFYING STATEMENTS The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA

2010 VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guidelines

12. Specialist neuro-rehabilitation services

Physical Dependency 1b - Mixed disability 1c – Cognitive behavioural Level 2: Specialist rehabilitation services (SRS) 2a – Supra-district services 2b - Local district services Level 3: Non-specialist rehabilitation services (NSRS) 3a – Other specialist services 3b - Generic rehab services TERTIARY SPECIALISED REHABILITATION SERVICES- provided at regional / national level Level 1: Specialised rehabilitation services Provided by specialised rehab teams led by consultants trained and accredited (...) rehab services It is therefore the proportion of complex patients that chiefly distinguishes these two levels of service. Specialised Neurorehabilitation Service Standards 7 30 4 2015-forweb.doc Updated 30.4.2015 7 Table 1: Four categories of patient need for rehabilitation services Patients with Category A rehabilitation needs ? Patient goals for rehabilitation may include: ? Improved physical, cognitive, social and psychological function / independence in activities in and around the home

2015 British Society of Rehabilitation Medicine

13. Rehabilitation of Lower Limb Amputation

Rehabilitation of Lower Limb Amputation VA/DoD CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINE FOR REHABILITATION OF INDIVIDUALS WITH LOWER LIMB AMPUTATION Department of Veterans Affairs Department of Defense QUALIFYING STATEMENTS The Department of Veterans Affairs and the Department of Defense guidelines are based upon the best information available at the time of publication. They are designed to provide information and assist decision making. They are not intended to define a standard of care and should (...) and/or therapeutic interventions within these guidelines does not guarantee coverage of civilian sector care. Additional information on current TRICARE benefits may be found at www.tricare.mil or by contacting your regional TRICARE Managed Care Support Contractor. Version 2.0 – 2017September 2017 Page 2 of 123 Prepared by: The Rehabilitation of Individuals with Lower Limb Amputation Work Group With support from: The Office of Quality, Safety and Value, VA, Washington, DC & Office of Evidence Based Practice, U.S

2017 VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guidelines

14. Prosthetic and Amputee Rehabilitation - Standards and Guidelines (3rd Edition)

. As part of their remit, they have also led on development of policies for prescription of microprocessor knee units, multi-articulated hands and high definition silicone cosmeses. At the time of writing only the microprocessor knees policy has been approved and the CRG has merged with the complex disability and spinal services CRGs into the Rehabilitation and Disability CRG. 2.14 The Royal College of Physicians published the Future Hospital Commission report 6 in 2013. The report set out (...) quality Specialist Rehabilitation services and form the backbone of this document: • Department of Health. A First Class Service: Quality in the New NHS. London: HSC. 1998. 1 • Department of Health. The NHS Plan – A plan for investment. A plan for reform. The Stationery Office London: 2000. 2 • HSC 1998/198 – Commissioning in the New NHS. 3 • Amputee Medical Rehabilitation Society. Amputee Rehabilitation – Recommended Standards and Guidelines. London: 1992. 4 • Amputee Medical Rehabilitation Society

2018 British Society of Rehabilitation Medicine

15. BSRM Standards for Rehabilitation Services Mapped on to the National Service Framework for Long-Term Conditions

and equipment can lead to unnecessary admissions and delay hospital discharge. Community rehabilitation services can also play a key role in integrated care planning (Quality Requirement 1) which forms the backbone to the NSF. Guidelines for implementation of the NSF recommend that service providers and commissioners should work together to increase capacity in rehabilitation services, both in hospital and the community which will help to relieve pressure on acute beds. Key BSRM documents that provide (...) The beds must be co-located, together with therapy facilities (see S10), to provide a rehabilitative environment and to support co-ordinated inter-disciplinary team-working between nursing therapy and medical teams • In addition, complex specialised rehabilitation (tertiary) services should be provided for patients with complex rehabilitation needs eg severe brain or spinal cord injury, low awareness states, challenging behaviour or concurrent complex medical needs. These should: o be provided in co

2009 British Society of Rehabilitation Medicine

16. Spine imaging

5 Ordering of Multiple Studies 5 Simultaneous Ordering of Multiple Studies 5 Repeated Imaging 5 Pre-Test Requirements 6 History 6 Imaging of the Spine 7 General Information/Overview 7 Scope 7 Technology Considerations 7 Definitions 7 Clinical Indications 9 Congenital and Developmental Conditions 9 Chiari malformation 9 Congenital spinal cord anomalies not listed 9 Congenital vertebral defects 10 Craniocervical junction abnormalities 10 Scoliosis 10 Spinal dysraphism 11 Tethered cord 11 (...) Infectious and Inflammatory Conditions 12 Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (Pediatric only) 12 Multiple sclerosis or other white matter disease 12 Rheumatoid arthritis (Adult only) 12 Spinal infection 13 Spondyloarthropathy 13 Trauma 14 Cervical injury 14 Thoracic or lumbar injury 14 Tumor 15 Tumor 15 Miscellaneous Conditions of the Spine 15 Osteoporosis and osteopenia 15 Spinal cord infarction 16 Spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis 16 Syringomyelia 16 Signs and Symptoms 16 Cauda equina syndrome 16

2019 AIM Specialty Health

17. Evidence-Based Clinical Guidelines for Multidisciplinary Spine Care: Diagnosis and Treatment of Low Back Pain

Society of Spine Radiology (ASSR) Medical & Psychological Treatment Section Section Chair: Christopher M. Bono, MD Authors: Paul Dougherty, DC Gazanfar Rahmathulla, MD, MBBS Christopher K. Taleghani, MD Terry Trammell, MD Randall P. Brewer, MD; Stakeholder Representative, American Academy of Pain Medicine (AAPM) Ravi Prasad, PhD; Stakeholder Representative, American Academy of Pain Medicine (AAPM) Contributor: John P. Birkedal, MD Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Section Section Chair: Charles (...) for adult patients suffering with spinal disorders, NASS is committed to multidisciplinary involvement in the process of guideline development. To this end, NASS has ensured that representatives from research, both operative and non-operative, medical, interventional and surgical spine specialties have participated in the development and review of NASS guidelines. To en- sure broad-based representation on this topic, NASS invited representatives from organizations whose members are involved in the care

2020 American Academy of Pain Medicine

18. Interventional Spine and Pain Procedures in Patients on Antiplatelet and Anticoagulant Medications

varies based on anatomical level with the posterior epidural space measuring approximately 0.4 mm at C7 to T1, 7.5 mm in the upper thoracic spine, 4.1 mm at the T11 to T12, and 4 to 7 mm in the lumbar regions. The epidural space has extensive thin-walled valveless venous plexi (plexus venous vertebralis interior, anterior, and posterior), which are vulnerable to damage during needle puncture and advancement of spinal cord stimulator leads and epidural and intrathecal catheters. These epidural veins (...) of the respondents (98%) followed ASRA guidelines for anticoagulants but not for antiplatelet agents. Two-thirds of the participants (67%) had separate protocols regarding aspirin [acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)] or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Moreover, 55% stopped ASA before spinal cord stimulation (SCS) trials and implants, and 32% stopped ASA before epidural steroid injections (ESIs). However, 17% admitted that they used different protocols for cervical spine injections as compared with lumbar

2018 American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine

19. Transportation of Patients With Acute Traumatic Cervical Spine Injuries Full Text available with Trip Pro

Medical Center from 1985 to 1988 to determine the effect of these variables on impairment and neurological improvement. Sixty-one patients were reviewed. Twenty-five patients were transported by ground ambulance (41%), 33 by helicopter (54%), and 3 by fixed-wing aircraft (5%). Forty-three patients (70.5%) had cervical spinal injuries, 11 patients (18%) had thoracic spine injuries, and 7 patients (11.5%) had lumbar spinal injuries. Fifty-one patients (84%) were transferred within 24 hours of injury (...) Traumatic Cervical Spine Injuries, Neurosurgery , Volume 72, Issue suppl_3, March 2013, Pages 35–39, Download citation file: © 2019 Oxford University Press Permissions Icon Navbar Search Filter Mobile Microsite Search Term Close search filter search input , , RECOMMENDATIONS Level III: Expeditious and careful transport of patients with acute cervical spine or spinal cord injuries is recommended from the site of injury by the most appropriate mode of transportation available to the nearest capable

2013 Congress of Neurological Surgeons

20. Antithrombotic Therapies in Spine Surgery

ensured that representatives from medical, interventional and surgical spine specialties have participated in the development and review of all NASS guidelines. It is also important that primary care providers and musculoskeletal specialists who care for pa- tients with spinal complaints are represented in the development and review of guidelines that address treatment by first contact physicians, and NASS has involved these providers in the development process as well. To ensure broad-based (...) of which might influence the risk for thromboembolic disease. For example, it is well-established that bed rest is a risk factor for DVT. However, the pace at which patients are mobilized after spinal surgery varies widely. Mobilization protocols are rarely reported in detail in spine surgical studies. Because of these issues, the work group was unable to definitively answer the posed questions related to incidence of DVT/PE in spinal surgery patients not re- ceiving prophylactic antithrombotic

2009 North American Spine Society

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