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121. Prioritizing Functional Capacity as a Principal End Point for Therapies Oriented to Older Adults With Cardiovascular Disease

exacerbate risks of disability, dependency, and frailty. Whereas most major randomized controlled trials of therapies for cardiovascular disease (CVD) are usually oriented to outcomes metrics of mortality, morbidity (clinical events), and hospitalizations, they rarely address the associated risks of functional loss that can occur even if the initial therapies seem to go well. Not only are strategies to better preserve physical capacity and to minimize declines important steps to reduce disease-related (...) and research. The physical function measured should fit within a well-developed conceptual framework that links the disease with the patient’s physical function and the potential ability to modify this function. Patients with CVD should perceive the importance of the physical function on their sense of well-being, and well-characterized, expected baseline metrics and changes should be measured within different patient groups with and without comorbid illnesses. Exercise training remains a primary therapy

2017 American Heart Association

122. ACR-ABS-ACNM-ASTRO-SIR-SNMMI Practice Parameters for Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT) or Radioembolization for Treatment of Liver Malignancies

(RSO) and state. This includes training in physics as well as completion of the necessary training and proctoring by the yttrium-90 manufacturers. B. Radiation Oncologists As well as having training and expertise in the overall management and specific radiation treatment of a wide range of human malignancies, radiation oncologists are experts on liver tolerance to radiation therapy and radiation complications in normal tissues. The radiation oncologist may be the AU at the treating facility (...) exposure monitoring program, as required by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and agreement states 2. Charting systems and forms for documenting all aspects of the treatment, including the prescription, definition and delivery of treatment parameters, and summaries of brachytherapy. In addition, any previous interventions, such as chemotherapy, external-beam radiation therapy, and surgeries, should be documented. 3. A physics program for ensuring accurate dose delivery to the patient 4. A check

2019 Society of Interventional Radiology

123. Insulin therapy in type 2 diabetes

, with little or no improvement in blood glucose control. Physical and mental health — the potential benefits of insulin therapy may not outweigh the potential risks, especially the risk of . Anxiety about needles. Personal preference. Concerns relating to license to drive group 2 vehicles. See Appendix D in the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) document for more information. In children and young people with type 2 diabetes, when to consider insulin therapy will be determined (...) Insulin therapy in type 2 diabetes Insulin therapy in type 2 diabetes - NICE CKS Share Insulin therapy in type 2 diabetes: Summary Insulin is a polypeptide hormone secreted by pancreatic beta-cells. The role of insulin is to lower blood glucose to prevent hyperglycaemia and its associated complications, including microvascular complications (retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy), macrovascular complications (cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and peripheral arterial disease), and metabolic

2016 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

124. Insulin therapy in type 1 diabetes

different basal rates of insulin at different times of the day and night, with higher infusion rates triggered by the push of a button at meal times. The insulin requirement can be matched more closely to the person's basal requirement, pre-prandial glucose levels, carbohydrate intake, and physical activity. Insulin pump therapy: Is considerably more expensive than insulin injections (pumps cost between £2000–£3000 at the time of writing). Should only be initiated by a trained specialist team, which (...) Insulin therapy in type 1 diabetes Insulin therapy in type 1 diabetes - NICE CKS Share Insulin therapy in type 1 diabetes: Summary Insulin is a polypeptide hormone secreted by pancreatic beta-cells. The role of insulin is to lower blood glucose to prevent hyperglycaemia and its associated complications, including microvascular complications (retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy), macrovascular complications (cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and peripheral arterial disease), and metabolic

2016 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

125. New patients with hemophilia, starting my child on prophylaxis (regular replacement therapy)

New patients with hemophilia, starting my child on prophylaxis (regular replacement therapy) Prophylaxis treatment options for untreated children with severe hemophilia: starting time and dose This document prepares the clinician to discuss scientific evidence with the patient (or care taker) so they can make an informed decision together. Decision 1: What are the options for when to start prophylaxis? Early: before or at least after the first joint bleed or during the 1st or 2nd year of age (...) an implantable central venous access device (CVAD). 5 Older children might also better accept the infusion and require less time. CVADs are associated with: - high risk of infection: rate of 0.66 per 1,000 catheter-days 6 - of 53 children with CVADs, 30% experienced complications after 18 months 7 - of 15 children with CVADs, 53% had deep vein thrombosis after 5½ years 8 complications need for rigorous training and frequent care 9 limited physical activity (for tunneled CVADs only). 9 6 1 0 6 4 10 8 Early

2014 Cancer Council Australia

126. Recovering after radiation therapy: A guide for women

activities in order to keep the vagina open. * M an y w omen ha v e concer ns about the HP V and its link t o cer vical and anal cancer . Your healthcare team will be happy to discuss any concerns you may have in more detail. of penetration can occur . I nsufficient pr eparation f or sexual penetration, both physical and psychological, can make this worse. Some women find that sperm stings after radiation therapy and have found that using condoms helps reduce the sting and reduces friction during (...) rather than suffering alone or feeling that you cannot talk about the feelings that may be troubling you. Please see pages 35-39. “Apart from the physical effects of cancer, we’re aware of the emotional toll cancer and its treatment can take on you and your family… ” “Pleasure, laughing and love help me to stay well and look forward”32. 33. Georgina (44) has been through pelvic radiation therapy for Anal Cancer The doctor told me before I started radiotherapy that the treatment would put me

2015 SickKids Supportive Care Guidelines

127. Recovering after radiation therapy: A guide for women

can occur . I nsufficient pr eparation f or sexual penetration, both physical and psychological, can make this worse. Some women find that sperm stings after radiation therapy and have found that using condoms helps reduce the sting and reduces friction during penetration. Finding more comfortable sexual positions, using extra lubrication, being gentle and patient may all help if pain is experienced during sexual intercourse. To help reduce pain and vaginal tightness some women have found (...) Recovering after radiation therapy: A guide for women A guide for women Recovering after Pelvic Radiation TherapyACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This booklet was conceived and developed by a team from the Centre for Medical Psychology and Evidence-based Decision–making (CeMPED) at the University of Sydney, led by Dr Fran Lubotzky and Dr Ilona Juraskova. We gratefully acknowledge the following people for their valuable input into the development of this resource: The women with gynaecological and anorectal

2015 SickKids Supportive Care Guidelines

128. Occupational therapy in neonatal services and early intervention

to the inclusion of occupational therapy within neonatal multidisciplinary teams. Occupational therapy makes a unique contribution to the neonatal team, and the services it provides to infants and families. Occupational therapists have specific skills and knowledge which can enhance the delivery of neonatal care: • Unlike other professions, one of the distinctive characteristics of occupational therapy education is that it incorporates both physical and mental healthcare models, resulting in a holistic (...) Occupational therapy in neonatal services and early intervention Occupational therapy in neonatal services and early intervention Practice guideline Royal College of Occupational TherapistsAbout the publisher www.RCOT.co.uk The Royal College of Occupational Therapists is a wholly owned subsidiary of the British Association of Occupational Therapists (BAOT) and operates as a registered charity. It represents the profession nationally and internationally, and contributes widely to policy

2017 British Association of Occupational Therapists

129. Clinical practice guideline on intravenous therapy with temporary devices in adults

technicians, image diagnostic technicians, physical therapists, etc. It is also targeted at healthcare managers and persons who are responsible for health strategies. The guideline also includes information targeted at caregivers for those situations in which intravenous therapy is administered at home. The CPG includes recommendations for taking care of patients with intravenous therapy who are at primary care centres, hospitals and homes. Its content reflects the evidence at the time it was prepared, up (...) of the guideline are all healthcare professionals, specifically in the medical and nursing field, who take part in caring for patients with intravenous therapy. Other healthcare professionals involved in patient care and attention are also targets, such as nursing assistants, laboratory technicians, image diagnostic technicians, physical therapists, etc. Likewise, the guideline is targeted at persons who are responsible for health strategies and healthcare managers. 28 Cpg On intra VenOus therepY With teMpOrar

2014 GuiaSalud

130. Occupational therapy with people who have had lower limb amputations: evidence-based guidelines

therapy with adults who have had lower limb amputationsCollege of Occupational Therapists Limited The professional body for occupational therapy staff (A subsidiary of the British Association of Occupational Therapists Limited) 106–114 Borough High Street, London SE1 1LB Tel: 020 7357 6480 www.COT.org.uk • The development of a positive relationship between regular participation in physical activity and body image can be encouraged by occupational therapists (Wetterhahn et al 2002). • Occupational (...) , Sanam K, Hirst L, Neumann V (2010) Major lower limb amputation – what, why and how to achieve the best results. Orthopaedics and Trauma, 24(4), 276-285. Spiliotopoulou G, Atwal A (2012) Is occupational therapy practice for older adults with lower limb amputations evidence-based? A systematic review. Prosthetics and Orthotics International, 36(1), 7-14. Wetterhahn KA, Hanson C, Levy CE (2002) Effect of participation in physical activity on body image of amputees. American Journal of Physical Medicine

2011 British Association of Occupational Therapists

131. Occupational therapy for people with Parkinson's disease

the benefi ts that occupational therapy, physiotherapy, and speech and language therapy can bring to their functional status and quality of life, and appreciate the way in which interventions are tailored to their specifi c activity and participation needs. This individual approach, while valued by people with Parkinson’s, has also presented obstacles to widespread recognition of the benefi ts of occupational therapy. Each individual with Parkinson’s is unique; the combination of a range of physical (...) , mental and emotional symptoms impacting on a specifi c physical, social and vocational environment means that a ‘one size fi ts all’ intervention with a single outcome measure is of limited, if any, value. Not surprisingly there has been little consensus, few randomised controlled trials, and therefore little evidence to synthesise. As stated in the Cochrane reviews, ‘there is inadequate evidence to evaluate the effect of occupational therapy for people with Parkinson’s disease’ but lack of evidence

2010 British Association of Occupational Therapists

132. Occupational Therapy for people Undergoing total hip replacement

. It is suggested that the return to physical and sporting activities is considered within an occupational therapy assessment and interventions. (Abe et al 2014 [C]; Cowie et al 2013 [C]; Harding et al 2014 [C]; Ollivier et al 2014 [C]; Vissers et al 2013 [C]; Wagenmakers et al 2011 [C]; Williams et al 2012 [C]; Wilson and Villar 2011 [D]) [New statement and evidence 2017] 2C 20. It is suggested that where specific needs are identified, the occupational therapist refers the service user on to community (...) Occupational Therapy for people Undergoing total hip replacement Occupational therapy for adults undergoing total hip replacement Practice guideline Second Edition Royal College of Occupational TherapistsCover photographs (inset, top right) ©Tessa Fincham 1/17 Mrs Jeffries, a service user, describes her experience of total hip replacement: Total hip replacements may be a common procedure but they are always life-changing and challenging for the individual concerned. As my osteoarthritis became

2018 British Association of Occupational Therapists

133. Guidelines for the Administration of Electroconvulsive Therapy

Guidelines for the Administration of Electroconvulsive Therapy https://doi.org/10.1177/0004867419839139 Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry 1 –15 DOI: 10.1177/0004867419839139 © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2019 Article reuse guidelines: sagepub.com/journals-permissions journals.sagepub.com/home/anp Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 00(0) Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists professional practice guidelines (...) for the administration of electroconvulsive therapy Alan Weiss 1 , Salam Hussain 2,3 , Bradley Ng 4 , Shanthi Sarma 5 , John Tiller 6,7 , Susan Waite 8,9 and Colleen Loo 10,11 Abstract Objectives: To provide guidance for the optimal administration of electroconvulsive therapy, in particular maintaining the high efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy while minimising cognitive side-effects, based on scientific evidence and supplemented by expert clinical consensus. Methods: Articles and information were sourced from

2019 American Psychiatric Association

134. The role of hormone replacement therapy in women with a previous diagnosis of breast cancer

. 41. Nordin BEC. Calcium and osteoporosis. Nutrition 1997 ; 13 : 664 -86. 42. Prior JC, Barr SI, Chow R, Faulker RA. Physical activity as therapy for osteoporosis. CMAJ 1996 ; 155 (7): 940 -4. 43. Saarto T, Blomqvist C, Valimaki M, Makela P, Sarna S, Elomaa I. Chemical castration induced by adjuvant cyclophosphamide, methotrexate and flurouracil chemotherapy use rapid bone loss that is reduced by clodronate: a randomized study in premenopausal breast cancer patients. J Clin Oncol 1997 ; 15 : 1341 (...) The role of hormone replacement therapy in women with a previous diagnosis of breast cancer Clinical practice guidelines for the care and treatment of breast cancer: 14. The role of hormone replacement therapy in women with a previous diagnosis of breast cancer | CMAJ Main menu User menu Search Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Research article Clinical practice guidelines for the care and treatment of breast cancer: 14. The role of hormone replacement therapy in women

2002 CPG Infobase

135. Nutrition Therapy in the Adult Hospitalized Patient

Nutrition Therapy in the Adult Hospitalized Patient nature publishing group 1 © 2016 by the American College of Gastroenterology The American Journal of GASTROENTEROLOGY PRACTICE GUIDELINES INTRODUCTION Th e modern era of clinical nutrition began with the develop- ment of total parenteral nutrition (PN) by Dudrick ( 1 ) in 1966, suggesting for the fi rst time that clinicians could compensate for intestinal failure with the potential to supply nutrients to any hospitalized patient. Further (...) support for the unique contribution of PN came from a paper entitled “Th e Skeleton in the Hospital Closet” by Butterworth ( 2 ), which indicated that nearly 50% of patients in an urban hospital setting (in the United States) were malnourished. Th e response to these innovative concepts spurred the growth of nutrition support teams and PN-based therapy over the next two decades with the primary objective being to maintain lean body mass, achieve nitrogen balance, and prevent malnutri- tion ( 3 ). Over

2016 American College of Gastroenterology

136. Guidelines for the Provision and Assessment of Nutrition Support Therapy in the Adult Critically Ill Patient

oxygen (eg, nasal cannula, bilevel positive airway pressure), ventilator settings (fractional inspiratory oxygen and positive end‐expiratory pressure), continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT), anesthesia, physical therapy, and excessive movement. More than 200 predictive equations have been published in the literature, with accuracy rates ranging from 40%–75% when compared with IC, and no single equation emerges as being more accurate in an ICU. ‐ Predictive equations are less accurate in obese (...) Guidelines for the Provision and Assessment of Nutrition Support Therapy in the Adult Critically Ill Patient Guidelines for the Provision and Assessment of Nutrition Support Therapy in the Adult Critically Ill Patient - McClave - 2016 - Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition - Wiley Online Library Search within Search term Search term The full text of this article hosted at iucr.org is unavailable due to technical difficulties. Clinical Guideline Free Access Guidelines for the Provision

2016 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition

137. Atopic dermatitis – Treatment with topical therapies

Atopic dermatitis – Treatment with topical therapies Guidelines of care for the management of atopic dermatitis - Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology Email/Username: Password: Remember me Search JAAD & JAAD Case Reports Search Terms Search within Search Access provided by Volume 71, Issue 1, Pages 116–132 Guidelines of care for the management of atopic dermatitis Section 2. Management and treatment of atopic dermatitis with topical therapies Work Group:, x Lawrence F. Eichenfield (...) and chronic, pruritic inflammatory skin condition that can affect all age groups. This evidence-based guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in its management. In this second of 4 sections, treatment of atopic dermatitis with nonpharmacologic interventions and pharmacologic topical therapies are reviewed. Where possible, suggestions on dosing and monitoring are given based on available evidence. Key words: , , , , , , , , Abbreviations used

2014 American Academy of Dermatology

138. Atopic dermatitis – Flare prevention and use of adjunctive therapies and approaches

Atopic dermatitis – Flare prevention and use of adjunctive therapies and approaches Guidelines of care for the management of atopic dermatitis - Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology Email/Username: Password: Remember me Search JAAD & JAAD Case Reports Search Terms Search within Search Access provided by Volume 71, Issue 6, Pages 1218–1233 Guidelines of care for the management of atopic dermatitis Section 4. Prevention of disease flares and use of adjunctive therapies and approaches (...) dermatitis is a common, chronic inflammatory dermatosis that can affect all age groups. This evidence-based guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in its management. In this final section, treatments for flare prevention and adjunctive and complementary therapies and approaches are reviewed. Suggestions on use are given based on available evidence. Key words: , , , , , , , , , , Abbreviations used: ( ), ( ), ( ), ( ), ( ), ( ), ( ), ( ), ( ), ( ), ( ), ( ), ( ), ( ) Disclaimer

2014 American Academy of Dermatology

139. Primary prevention of cardiovascular disease: new guidelines, technologies and therapies

Primary prevention of cardiovascular disease: new guidelines, technologies and therapies Primary prevention of cardiovascular disease: new guidelines, technologies and therapies | The Medical Journal of Australia mja-search search Use the for more specific terms. Title contains Body contains Date range from Date range to Article type Author's surname Volume First page doi: 10.5694/mja__.______ Search Reset  close Individual Login Purchase options Connect person_outline Login (...) keyboard_arrow_down Individual Login Purchase options menu search Advertisement close Primary prevention of cardiovascular disease: new guidelines, technologies and therapies Mark R Nelson and Jennifer A Doust Med J Aust 2013; 198 (11): 606-610. || doi: 10.5694/mja12.11054 Published online: 17 June 2013 Topics Abstract A trend in primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been a move away from managing isolated risk factors, such as hypertension and dyslipidaemia, towards assessment and management

2013 MJA Clinical Guidelines

140. Use of Endocrine Therapy for Breast Cancer Risk Reduction

Use of Endocrine Therapy for Breast Cancer Risk Reduction Use of Endocrine Therapy for Breast Cancer Risk Reduction: ASCO Clinical Practice Guideline Update | Journal of Clinical Oncology Search in: Menu Article Tools ASCO SPECIAL ARTICLE Article Tools OPTIONS & TOOLS COMPANION ARTICLES No companion articles ARTICLE CITATION DOI: 10.1200/JCO.19.01472 Journal of Clinical Oncology - published online before print September 3, 2019 PMID: Use of Endocrine Therapy for Breast Cancer Risk Reduction (...) guidance on clinical issues that arise when deciding to use endocrine therapy for breast cancer risk reduction. METHODS An Expert Panel conducted targeted systematic literature reviews to identify new studies. RESULTS A randomized clinical trial that evaluated the use of anastrozole for reduction of estrogen receptor–positive breast cancers in postmenopausal women at increased risk of developing breast cancer provided the predominant basis for the update. UPDATED RECOMMENDATIONS In postmenopausal women

2019 American Society of Clinical Oncology Guidelines

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