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101. Aspirin Use to Prevent Cardiovascular Disease and Colorectal Cancer: Preventive Medication

to be important risk factors for GI bleeding. Other risk factors include upper GI tract pain, GI ulcers, concurrent anticoagulation or NSAID use, and uncontrolled hypertension. , Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy combined with aspirin use increases the risk for serious GI bleeding compared with aspirin use alone. The rate of serious bleeding among aspirin users is about 2 to 3 times greater in patients with a history of GI ulcer. The risk for serious GI bleeding is 2 times greater in men than (...) for aspirin therapy and were at increased CHD risk (>10% 10-year risk), about 41% were told by a physician to take aspirin. Among patients aged 65 years or older who were told by a physician to take aspirin, 80% adhered to the recommendation. Useful Resources The USPSTF has made other recommendations on CVD prevention, including smoking cessation and promoting a healthful diet and physical activity, as well as screening for carotid artery stenosis, CHD, high blood pressure, lipid disorders, obesity

2016 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

102. Breast Cancer: Medication Use to Reduce Risk

-sensitive epithelial cells where breast cancer can develop. These medications have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for risk reduction of breast cancer. Aromatase inhibitors inhibit conversion of androgen to estrogen and can reduce risk of ER-positive breast cancer by decreasing the amount of estrogen available to bind to estrogen-sensitive epithelial cells. Aromatase inhibitors have been evaluated for risk reduction of breast cancer in clinical trials, although they are primarily (...) used for treatment rather than risk reduction of primary cancer. Aromatase inhibitors are not currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for risk reduction of primary breast cancer. This recommendations is consistent with the 2013 USPSTF recommendation. As before, the USPSTF recommends offering risk-reducing medications to women at increased risk for breast cancer and at low risk for adverse medication effects (B recommendation) and recommends against routine use of risk-reducing

2019 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

103. Medical Emergencies - dyspnoea

decompression of the affected side, if suitably trained (refer to thoracic trauma guideline). Reassess degree of dyspnoea after treatment ADDITIONAL INFORMATION SpO2 level ? SpO2 levels 0.5cm and clinically meaningful improvement seen in changes >2.2cm. 18 VAS scales have been utilised in the pre-hospital ?eld to indicate the ef?cacy of different drug treatments. 19,20Dyspnoea Page 4 of 5 October 2006 Medical Emergencies In Adults Medical Emergencies in Adults Visual Analogue Scale GREATEST BREATHLESSNESS (...) NO BREATHLESSNESS Key Points – Dyspnoea ? Is breathlessness of respiratory, cardiac, both or other causes? ? Saturation levels of oxygen <95% are considered hypoxic. ? The visual analogue score is a useful indicator as to the level of dyspnoea and response to treatment. ? Oxygen therapy is essential in dyspnoeic patients; a diagnosis of COPD is not a contra- indication to its administration. REFERENCES 1 Frownfelter D, Ryan J. Dyspnea – Measurement and evaluation. Cardiopulmonary Physical Therapy Journal

2007 Joint Royal Colleges Ambulance Liaison Committee

104. Medical Emergencies - mental disorder

of the complaint is required. This should be carefully explored, with particular reference to previous mental health service involvement, prescription medication, the level of alcohol use and potential substance misuse. Details of the nature of the problem, the presence of hallucinations or delusions, whether visual or auditory, and the patient’s thoughts about their experiences and problems are key. Examination Physical illness can present as an apparent mental health problem and clinical examination (...) , these drugs can be taken orally or given by injection and are powerful tranquillizers. They can be used in acute situations to sedate, but are most frequently used in the medium to long- term management of disorders such as schizophrenia. Mental Disorder Medical Emergencies in Adults October 2006 Page 3 of 4Mental Disorder Page 4 of 4 October 2006 Medical Emergencies In Adults Medical Emergencies in Adults COMPULSORY ASSESSMENT, TREATMENT AND DETENTION USING THE MENTAL HEALTH ACT 1983 The principal series

2007 Joint Royal Colleges Ambulance Liaison Committee

105. The Geriatricians’ Perspective on Medical Services to Residential Aged Care Facilities (RCFs) in Australia.

Comprehensive Medical Assessments and Care Plans and assisting them with access to the multidisciplinary team enhancements and allied health funding. Multidisciplinary practice models that include a geriatrician, nurses, and allied health therapists, are the cornerstone of hospital and ambulatory geriatric medicine, and there is good evidence for the efficacy of this model in reducing decline in physical functioning. [54]. The Transition Care Program in Australia has allowed for the development (...) The Geriatricians’ Perspective on Medical Services to Residential Aged Care Facilities (RCFs) in Australia. Australian and New Zealand Society for Geriatric Medicine Position Statement No’s 9 and 10 The Geriatricians’ Perspective on Medical Services to Residential Aged Care Facilities (RCFs) in Australia. Revised August 2011 Companion paper regarding the NZ perspective to follow. 1. The demand for residential aged care in Australia continues to grow as the population ages. 2. Dementia, chronic

2020 Australian and New Zealand Society for Geriatric Medicine

106. The Provision of Medical Services to Residential Aged Care Facilities (RCF's) in Australia

The Provision of Medical Services to Residential Aged Care Facilities (RCF's) in Australia Australian and New Zealand Society for Geriatric Medicine Position Statement No’s 9 and 10 Provision of Medical Services to Residential Aged Care Facilities (RCFs) in Australia. Revised August 2011 Companion paper regarding the NZ perspective to follow 1. The demand for residential aged care in Australia continues to grow as the population ages. 2. Dementia, chronic illness, and physical disability (...) . There is a need for the establishment of a medical special interest group, dedicated to promoting high quality research and medical care for the residential care population, in which the Australian and New Zealand Society for Geriatric Medicine should have a major role. This body could progressively establish education and training requirements for recognition of competency in residential care medicine. This recognition could become an entitlement to a remuneration margin, thereby creating a competitive

2011 Australian and New Zealand Society for Geriatric Medicine

107. Update on COVID-19 epidemiology and impact on medical care in children: April 2020

) and underline the primary importance of meticulous environmental cleaning [ ] . Managing children and youth infected with symptomatic COVID-19 No treatment for COVID-19 is proven to be effective at the present time, and early reports from trials of hydroxychloroquine in adults have not demonstrated any beneficial effect on morbidity or mortality [ ] . Several Canadian universities, research centres, and medical organizations have recommended against using of off-label, investigational therapies (...) (PHAC) has suggested that wearing a non-medical mask can prevent spread of respiratory droplets from contaminating others or landing on surfaces. Both the PHAC and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) have indicated that masks covering the nose and mouth can be used by adults and by children over 2 years of age in community settings, for short periods, when physical distancing measures cannot be taken [ ] [ ] . Remind patients that touching the mask is a risk factor for contamination of hands

2020 Canadian Paediatric Society

108. European Academy of Neurology guideline on the management of medication-overuse headache

headache to exam- ine the impact of a 3-week outpatient interdisciplinary program that included medical interventions address- ing long-term preventive medications, intravenous bridge therapies such as intravenous dihydroergo- tamine and optimization of acute migraine and head- ache management strategies. Outcome parameters were physical functioning and psychological impair- ment. Assessments of headache severity, psychological status and functional impairment were completed by 371 subjects (97.8 (...) - usual frequency during the initial withdrawal period without the fear of causing rebound MOH. The drugs proposed for the treatment of headache dur- ing withdrawal as a bridging therapy are those rec- ommended for the acute migraine attack, e.g. diphenhydramine [93], dihydroergotamine [94], anti- dopaminergic drugs (chlorpromazine, prochlorper- azine, metoclopramide, droperidol) [95-98], valproic acid [99], ketorolac [10], magnesium [11] or corticos- teroids [12,103]. Many medications have been

2020 European Academy of Neurology

109. Medicines adherence: involving patients in decisions about prescribed medicines and supporting adherence

to communicate with their healthcare professional than others. 1.1.1 Healthcare professionals should adapt their consultation style to the needs of individual patients so that all patients have the opportunity to be involved in decisions about their medicines at the level they wish. 1.1.2 Consider any factors such as physical or learning disabilities, sight or hearing problems and difficulties with reading or speaking English, which may affect the patient's involvement in the consultation. 1.1.3 Establish (...) they might benefit from the treatment. Clearly explain the disease or condition and how the medicine will influence this. 1.1.9 Explain the medical aims of the treatment to patients and openly discuss the pros and cons of proposed medicines. The discussion should be at the level preferred by the patient. 1.1.10 Clarify what the patient hopes the treatment will achieve. 1.1.11 Avoid making assumptions about patient preferences about treatment. T alk to the patient to find out their preferences, and note

2009 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

110. Medicines optimisation: the safe and effective use of medicines to enable the best possible outcomes

medicines-related patient safety incidents 16 1.2 Medicines-related communication systems when patients move from one care setting to another 18 1.3 Medicines reconciliation 20 1.4 Medication review 21 1.5 Self-management plans 23 1.6 Patient decision aids used in consultations involving medicines 24 1.7 Clinical decision support 26 1.8 Medicines-related models of organisational and cross-sector working 27 2 Research recommendations 28 2.1 Medication review in children – suboptimal use of medicines (...) and medicines-related patient safety incidents 28 2.2 Medication review – suboptimal use of medicines and patient-reported outcomes 30 2.3 Clinical decision support systems 33 2.4 Cross-organisational working 35 3 Other information 38 3.1 Scope and how this guideline was developed 38 3.2 Related NICE guidance 38 Medicines optimisation: the safe and effective use of medicines to enable the best possible outcomes (NG5) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk

2015 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

111. Position Statement on the medicinal use of Cannabinoids in Pain Medicine

’ approach is of considerable concern, as is diversion to non-medical use. Therefore, only products produced to pharmaceutical standards should be considered. Patients living with chronic pain often have complex comorbidities and a multidisciplinary approach to management that includes physical and psychological therapy rather than reliance on medicines alone is more likely to be effective. With this in mind: ? The Faculty supports the setting up of robust trials to look at potential benefits (...) Position Statement on the medicinal use of Cannabinoids in Pain Medicine Faculty Position Statement on the medicinal use of Cannabinoids in Pain Medicine Update following the publication of NICE Guidance NG144 (11 November 2019) This statement is focused on the issues relating to cannabis derived medicinal products in relation to Pain Medicine. It does not comment on other areas of medical practice or recreational use, which lie outside our remit. The issue of cannabis, its extracts

2020 Faculty of Pain Medicine

112. Faculty Position Statement on the medicinal use of Cannabinoids in Pain Medicine

to pharmaceutical standards should be considered. Patients living with chronic pain often have complex comorbidities and a multidisciplinary approach to management that includes physical and psychological therapy rather than reliance on medicines alone is more likely to be effective. With this in mind: • The Faculty supports the setting up of robust trials to look at potential benefits in Pain. • The Faculty is unclear how a committee of “Medical Experts” could advise on the use of any cannabis-related products (...) Faculty Position Statement on the medicinal use of Cannabinoids in Pain Medicine Faculty Position Statement on the medicinal use of Cannabinoids in Pain Medicine This statement is focused on the issues relating to cannabis derived medicinal products in relation to Pain Medicine. It does not comment on other areas of medical practice or recreational use, which lie outside our remit. The issue of cannabis, its extracts, formulations and synthetics has very much been on the radar of pain medicine

2018 Faculty of Pain Medicine

113. Position statement on the use of antiretroviral therapy to reduce HIV transmission

transmission, measured from the time of randomization into the study, when the plasma viral load of the HIV-infected partner was below the limit of detec- tion [1]. For individuals initiating ART, it can be antici- pated that the majority of people starting an effective regimen based on their pretreatment viral genotype (i.e. their virus is sensitive to all the drugs taken) will achieve an undetectable viral load within 6 months of initiating therapy [11]. What is the actual risk of HIV transmission (...) Position statement on the use of antiretroviral therapy to reduce HIV transmission Position statement on the use of antiretroviral therapy to reduce HIV transmission, January 2013: The British HIV Association (BHIVA) and the Expert Advisory Group on AIDS (EAGA) S Fidler, 1 J Anderson, 2 Y Azad, 3 V Delpech, 4 C Evans, 5 M Fisher, 6 B Gazzard, 5 N Gill, 4 L Lazarus, 4 R Lowbury, 7 K Orton, 8 B Osoro, 9 K Radcliffe, 10 B Smith, 11 D Churchill, 6 K Rogstad 12 and G Cairns 13 1 Imperial College

2013 Publication 4880703

114. British Association of Dermatologists and British Photodermatology Group guidelines for the safe and effective use of psoralen ultraviolet A (PUVA) therapy

psoralen–ultraviolet A therapy (PUVA) Advantages of oral PUVA Advantages of topical PUVA Shorter overall outpatient attendance times No risk of gastrointestinal adverse effects Less staff involvement Drug interactions unlikely Less risk of phototoxic reactions from natural UV exposure (lower concentration of psoralen in the skin after treatment) Eye protection not always required Only practical option for whole-body treatment for units with inadequate bath facilities Shorter periods in treatment (...) or almost clear’ by 8 weeks 45 65% (44% to 86%) Ellis 18 1991 Ciclosporin 3 mg/kg/day ‘clear or almost clear’ by 8 weeks 50 36% (17% to 55%) Saurat 19 2008 Methotrexate PASI 75% reducon 163 17% (3% to 30% Systemic better Placebo better Fig 3. Randomized controlled trials comparing conventional systemic therapies with placebo for psoriasis. CI, con?dence interval; PASI 75%, 75% reduction in Psoriasis Area and Severity Index. Biological drug n (number treated with biological) % more reaching PASI 75

2016 British Association of Dermatologists

115. Interventional Therapies, Surgery, and Interdisciplinary Rehabilitation for Low Back Pain

; **Department of Neurosurgery, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI; ††Department of Orthopedic Surgery , Stanford University, Stanford, CA; ‡‡Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Baylor College of Medicine, The Institute for Rehabilitation and Research, Houston, TX; §§Department of Community Health, Rhode Island Spine Center, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Pawtucket, RI; ¶¶Department of Neurosurgery, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI; ∥∥Department of Physical Medicine (...) and disabling low back pain are presented. From the *Department of Medicine, Oregon Evidence-based Practice Center, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR; †Department of Neurological Surgery , University of Washington, Seattle, WA; ‡Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Palo Alto, CA; §Stanford University, Stanford, CA; ¶Department of Anesthesiology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA; ∥Medical Services,General Medicine Division, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA

2009 Publication 1228

116. Guidelines for the Administration of Electroconvulsive Therapy

that electroconvulsive therapy is a continually evolving practice. Conclusion: The guidelines provide up-to-date advice for psychiatrists to promote optimal standards of electroconvul- sive therapy practice. Keywords Guidelines, electroconvulsive therapy, monitoring, depressive disorders, schizophrenia 1 School of Medicine and Public Health, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle, Australia, Callaghan, NSW, Australia 2 School of Psychiatry, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, The University (...) medical conditions, a second opinion should be obtained from a psychiatrist experienced in ECT practice, as well as from the anaesthe- tist and other relevant specialists. There should be a spe- cific plan documented by the psychiatrist to address the management of medical comorbidity during ECT, which may include appropriate specialist medical support. All patients receiving ECT should be closely monitored to detect the development of any adverse physical or cogni- tive effects.4 ANZJP Articles

2019 American Psychiatric Association

117. ASTRO Guideline on Definitive and Postoperative Radiation Therapy for Basal and Squamous Cell Cancers of the Skin

ASTRO Guideline on Definitive and Postoperative Radiation Therapy for Basal and Squamous Cell Cancers of the Skin Practical Radiation Oncology (2019) Definitive and Postoperative Radiation Therapy for Basal and Squamous Cell Cancers of the Skin: An ASTRO Clinical Practice Guideline Anna Likhacheva, MD, MPH, a* Musaddiq Awan, MD, b Christopher A. Barker, MD, c Ajay Bhatnagar, MD, d Lisa Bradfield, e Mary Sue Brady, MD, f Ivan Buzurovic, PhD, g Jessica L. Geiger, MD, h Upendra Parvathaneni, MBBS (...) , i Sandra Zaky, MD, j and Phillip M. Devlin, MD, k a. Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento, CA, Department of Radiation Oncology and Task Force Vice Chair b. Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, Department of Radiation Oncology c. Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, Department of Radiation Oncology d. Alliance Oncology, Casa Grande, AZ, Department of Radiation Oncology e. American Society for Radiation Oncology, Arlington, VA f. Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New

2020 American Society for Radiation Oncology

118. Compression therapy after invasive treatment of superficial veins of the lower extremities

Compression therapy after invasive treatment of superficial veins of the lower extremities Compression therapy after invasive treatment of superficial veins of the lower extremities: Clinical practice guidelines of the American Venous Forum, Society for Vascular Surgery, American College of Phlebology, Society for Vascular Medicine, and International Union of Phlebology - Journal of Vascular Surgery: Venous and Lymphatic Disorders Email/Username: Password: Remember me Search JVS Journals Search (...) Terms Search within Search Access provided by Volume 7, Issue 1, Pages 17–28 Compression therapy after invasive treatment of superficial veins of the lower extremities: Clinical practice guidelines of the American Venous Forum, Society for Vascular Surgery, American College of Phlebology, Society for Vascular Medicine, and International Union of Phlebology x Fedor Lurie Affiliations Jobst Vascular Institute of Promedica, Toledo, Ohio University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich Correspondence

2019 American Venous Forum

119. Barrett's oesophagus: ablative therapy

for Health Economics, University of York Mr Robin Beal Mr Robin Beal Consultant in Accident and Emergency Medicine, Isle of Wight Mrs Ailsa Donnelly Mrs Ailsa Donnelly Lay member Mrs Sar Mrs Sarah Fishburn ah Fishburn Lay member Dr John Harle Dr John Harley y Clinical Governance and Prescribing Lead and General Practitioner, North T ees PCT Dr Mark Hill Dr Mark Hill Head of Medical Affairs, Novartis Pharmaceuticals UK Ltd Barrett's oesophagus: ablative therapy (CG106) © NICE 2018. All rights reserved (...) Barrett's oesophagus: ablative therapy Barrett's oesophagus: ablativ Barrett's oesophagus: ablative ther e therap apy y Clinical guideline Published: 11 August 2010 nice.org.uk/guidance/cg106 © NICE 2018. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and-conditions#notice-of- rights).Y Y our responsibility our responsibility The recommendations in this guideline represent the view of NICE, arrived at after careful consideration of the evidence available. When

2010 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

120. Guideline on when to start antiretroviral therapy and on pre-exposure prophylaxis for HIV

to the medicines used to treat HIV. ART (antiretroviral therapy) refers to the use of a combination of three or more ARV drugs for treating HIV infection. ART involves lifelong treatment. Use of ARV drugs for HIV prevention refers to the HIV prevention benefits of ARV drugs and includes ARV drugs given to the mother or infant for preventing the mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT), ARV drugs to reduce the transmission of HIV among serodiscordant couples and ARV drugs to prevent people from acquiring HIV (...) Guideline on when to start antiretroviral therapy and on pre-exposure prophylaxis for HIV GUIDELINE ON WHEN TO START ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY AND ON PRE-EXPOSURE PROPHYLAXIS FOR HIV SEPTEMBER 2015 GUIDELINESThis early-release guideline will form part of the updated WHO consolidated guidelines on the use of antiretroviral drugs for treating and preventing HIV infection due to be published in 2016.GUIDELINE ON WHEN TO START ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY AND ON PRE-EXPOSURE PROPHYLAXIS FOR HIV SEPTEMBER

2015 World Health Organisation HIV Guidelines

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