How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

4,078 results for

physical therapy

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

81. Diagnosis and management of glycogen storage disease type I: a practice guideline of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics

of aspirin, nonsteroidal anti- inflammatory drugs, and other medications that reduce or affect platelet function should be avoided. Hypoglycemia risks should be checked before starting medications. Due consideration should be given to medications that have a high sodium or potassium content; the latter is especially important in the setting of renal failure. All patients should be encouraged to participate in age- appropriate physical activities. However, contact or competitive sports should be avoided (...) storage disease type I (GSD I) after reviewing the autopsy reports of two children whose livers and kidneys contained excessive amounts of Submitted 12 August 2014; accepted 12 August 2014; advance online publication 6 November 2014. doi:10.1038/gim.2014.128 Genet Med 00 00 2014 Genetics in Medicine 10.1038/gim.2014.128 ACMG Standards and Guidelines 00 00 12August2014 12August2014 © American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics 6November2014 Purpose: Glycogen storage disease type I (GSD I

2014 American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics

82. American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics guideline for the clinical evaluation and etiologic diagnosis of hearing loss

Angeles, Los Angeles, California, USA; 5 Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, USA; 6 Department of Human Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, USA; 7 Department of Human and Molecular Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, USA; 8 Laboratory for Molecular Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Cambridge (...) , Massachusetts, USA; 9 Department of Genetics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, USA; 10 Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA; 11 Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA; 12 School of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colorado, USA. Correspondence: Raye L. Alford (ralford@bcm.edu) American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics guideline for the clinical

2014 American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics

83. Medical Management of First-Trimester Abortion

other potential medical applications, including emergency contraception; cervical ripening and labor induction; and treatment of symptomatic uterine leiomyomas, endometriosis, Cushing syndrome, breast cancer, early pregnancy loss, and glaucoma ( , ). Misoprostol Misoprostol is an inexpensive prostaglandin E 1 analogue in a tablet form that is stable at room temperature. It is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for oral administration to prevent gastric ulcers in individuals who (...) small studies from China suggest that multiple daily administrations of letrozole followed by misoprostol, 800 micrograms vaginally, may be another effective option for medical abortion, but more research is needed regarding this regimen ( , ). Mifepristone Regimens Regimen approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration The FDA-approved regimen, as detailed in the mifepristone package labeling, is based on the original regimen registered in France 25 years ago. This regimen includes mifepristone

2014 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

84. A Practice Guideline from the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics and the National Society of Genetic Counselors: Referral Indications for Cancer Predisposition Assessment

if your patient or any of their first- degree relatives meet any of these referral criteria. Genet Med advance online publication 13 November 2014 Key Words: cancer genetics; cancer predisposition; genetic counsel- ing; referral guidelines; referral indications 1 Division of Human Genetics, Department of Internal Medicine, The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio, USA; 2 Genetic Medicine Clinic, Department of Medicine, University of W ashington Medical Center, Seattle, W (...) ashington, USA; 3 Cancer Prevention, Detection and Control Research Program, Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA; 4 Clinical and Translational Hereditary Cancer Program, Division of Genetic Medicine, Department of Medicine, V anderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, V anderbilt University, Nashville, T ennessee, USA. Correspondence: Heather Hampel (Heather.Hampel@osumc.edu) ©2014 American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics and National Society of Genetic Counselors. All

2015 American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics

85. Eligibility and Disqualification Recommendations for Competitive Athletes With Cardiovascular Abnormalities: Task Force 15: Legal Aspects of Medical Eligibility and Disqualification Recommendations

would expose himself to a medically unacceptable risk for ventricular fibrillation during competitive athletics, although 3 other cardiologists medically cleared him to play college basketball. The Chicago, Illinois–based United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit held that a university has the legal right to establish legitimate physical qualifications for its intercollegiate athletes and that Northwestern did not violate the Rehabilitation Act by following its team physician’s (...) reasonable medical advice. It ruled that an intercollegiate athlete may be medically disqualified and excluded from a sport if necessary to avoid a “significant risk of personal physical injury” (which requires consideration of both the probability and severity of potential harm, including the risk of death or serious injury) during competitive athletics that cannot be eliminated through the use of medication, monitoring, or protective equipment. The court explained that Northwestern’s decision

2015 American Heart Association

86. Medical Nutrition Education, Training, and Competencies to Advance Guideline-Based Diet Counseling by Physicians: A Science Advisory From the American Heart Association

medicine (LM) thread or track, an approach aligned with calls for more individualization in medical education. Rather than offering a distinct course or integration into standard UME curricula, some medical schools, such as Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and the University of South Carolina–Greenville School of Medicine, have introduced separate LM tracks that provide in-depth UME in nutrition alongside other lifestyle factors, including physical activity, substance and tobacco use (...) are especially important for those planning careers in primary care, cardiology, neurology, endocrinology, obesity treatment, gastroenterology, oncology, intensive care medicine, and some surgical subspecialties. Although expanded nutrition competencies are needed across all health professions, those presented herein are limited to medical students and trainees and form the basis of the entrustable professional activities (EPAs) related to nutrition that are also presented. Educational resources for building

2018 American Heart Association

87. Practice Advisory: FDA Boxed Warning on Immediate-Release Opioid Medications and All Prescription Opioids

22nd, 2016, the U. S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for immediate-release opioid pain medications. As part of these changes, the FDA is now requiring a new boxed warning (“black box” warning) about the serious risks of misuse, abuse, addiction, overdose, and death on all prescription opioids. The boxed warning will also include a precaution that chronic maternal opioid use during pregnancy can result in neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS, referred to in the FDA warning as “neonatal opioid (...) to the process of identifying women using chronic opioids and are not a direct result of the medication or drug itself. While opioid use clearly contributes to the clinical spectrum of NAS, the identification of women who use opioids chronically is a separate issue. Opposite to the intended effect of FDA’s new labeling rules, this identification may become more challenging with the universal implementation of a boxed warning on opioids. Impact on Care of Pregnant Women The concern with the new boxed warning

2016 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

88. Refusal of Medically Recommended Treatment During Pregnancy

. Obstetrician–gynecologists are discouraged in the strongest possible terms from the use of duress, manipulation, coercion, physical force, or threats, including threats to involve the courts or child protective services, to motivate women toward a specific clinical decision. Eliciting the patient’s reasoning, lived experience, and values is critically important when engaging with a pregnant woman who refuses an intervention that the obstetrician–gynecologist judges to be medically indicated for her well (...) refuses recommended medical treatments or chooses not to follow medical recommendations, there can be a range of minor to major risks to the patient or the fetus. In certain situations, a pregnant woman might refuse therapies that the medical professional believes are necessary for her health or survival, that of her fetus, or both. Examples of these situations include a pregnant woman refusing to treat a fetal condition or infection in utero or to undergo cesarean delivery when it is thought

2016 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

89. Standards and guidelines for the interpretation of sequence variants: a joint consensus recommendation of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published in the March 2015 issue of Genetics in M (Full text)

Standards and guidelines for the interpretation of sequence variants: a joint consensus recommendation of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published in the March 2015 issue of Genetics in M Standards and guidelines for the interpretation of sequence variants: a joint consensus recommendation of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics and the Association for Molecular Pathology | Genetics in Medicine Thank you (...) for Molecular Pathology , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , & ; on behalf of the ACMG Laboratory Quality Assurance Committee Genetics in Medicine volume 17 , pages 405 – 423 (2015) | Subjects Abstract Disclaimer: These ACMG Standards and Guidelines were developed primarily as an educational resource for clinical laboratory geneticists to help them provide quality clinical laboratory services. Adherence to these standards and guidelines is voluntary and does not necessarily assure a successful medical outcome

2015 Association for Molecular Pathology PubMed abstract

90. Interventional Spine and Pain Procedures in Patients on Antiplatelet and Anticoagulant Medications

guidelines for regional anesthesia in patients on antiplatelet and anticoagulant medications and/or if respondents incorporated different protocols for different pain procedures. One hundred twenty-four active participants attended the forum. Responses were collected using an audience response system. Eighty-four percent of respondents were anesthesiologists, and the remainders were physical medicine and rehabilitation physicians, neurologists, orthopedic surgeons, and neurological surgeons. Most (...) Interventional Spine and Pain Procedures in Patients on Antiplatelet and Anticoagulant Medications Interventional Spine and Pain Procedures in Patients on Anti... : Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine You may be trying to access this site from a secured browser on the server. Please enable scripts and reload this page. Login No user account? Lippincott Journals Subscribers , use your username or email along with your password to log in. Remember me on this computer Register for a free account

2015 American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine

91. Medical decision-making in paediatrics: Infancy to adolescence

Medical decision-making in paediatrics: Infancy to adolescence Medical decision-making in the paediatric population is complicated by the wide variation in physical and psychological development that occurs as children progress from infancy to adolescence. Parents and legal guardians are the de facto decision-makers in early infancy, but thereafter, the roles of parents/legal guardians and paediatric patients become ever more complex. Health care providers (HCPs), while not decision-makers per (...) se, have a significant role in medical decision-making throughout childhood. This statement outlines the ethical principles of medical decision-making for HCPs involved in caring for paediatric patients. This revision focuses on individual decision-making in the context of the patient–provider relationship and provides increased guidance for dealing with disagreements. Keywords: Advanced directives; Best Interests; Emancipated minors; End-of-life; Informed consent; Mature minors; SDM

2018 Canadian Paediatric Society

92. American Gastroenterological Association Institute Guideline on the Medical Management of Opioid-Induced Constipation (Full text)

., Dorn, S.D. et al. American Gastroenterological Association medical position statement on constipation. Gastroenterology . 2013 ; 144 : 211–217 | | | | | Once a diagnosis of OIC has been confirmed and other potential causes of constipation are excluded, the recommendations here can help guide appropriate evidence-based management. This guideline focuses on the medical management of OIC. Therefore, it does not address the role of psychological therapy, alternative medicine approaches, surgery (...) control, the AGA recommends escalation of therapy to PAMORA drugs with high- or moderate-quality evidence of efficacy, namely naldemedine and naloxegol. The AGA also conditionally recommends use of methylnatrexone. Due to insufficient evidence, the AGA did not issue a recommendation regarding use of either lubiprostone or prucalopride in OIC. The recommendations are similar to those proposed by recent clinical guidelines related to OIC published by the American Academy of Pain Medicine x 25 Muller

2019 American Gastroenterological Association Institute PubMed abstract

93. Principles of Pediatric Patient Safety: Reducing Harm Due to Medical Care

the standardization of concentrations in compounded medications; developing, spreading, and advocating for pediatric-specific health care information technology for drug delivery; educating providers on methods to reduce medication errors, including medication reconciliation; ensuring that providers maintain access to and proficiency in the use of a comprehensive and current pharmaceutical knowledge base; and creating policies that advocate for safe medication delivery to children in all health care settings (...) . Principles of Pediatric Patient Safety: Reducing Harm Due to Medical Care Brigitta U. Mueller , Daniel Robert Neuspiel , Erin R. Stucky Fisher , COUNCIL ON QUALITY IMPROVEMENT AND PATIENT SAFETY, COMMITTEE ON HOSPITAL CARE Abstract Pediatricians render care in an increasingly complex environment, which results in multiple opportunities to cause unintended harm. National awareness of patient safety risks has grown since the National Academy of Medicine (formerly the Institute of Medicine) published its

2019 American Academy of Pediatrics

94. Medically Unexplained Symptoms

or psychiatric nurse in primary care; • primary care psychologist trained in cognitive behavioural therapy. Step 3 • Patient with severe MUS • In collaboration with secondary care providers Collaboration with/referral to: • multidisciplinary teams/treatment centres. MEDICALLY UNEXPLAINED SYMPTOMS (MUS) NHG GUIDELINE (summary) M102 Non-drug treatment THERAPEUTIC RECOMMENDATIONS (...) Medically Unexplained Symptoms © 2013, Dutch College of General Practitioners www.nhg.org may 2013 ? Medically unexplained symptoms (MUS) are defined as physical symptoms persisting for more than several weeks and for which adequate medical examination has not revealed any condition that adequately explains the symptoms. ? MUS is a working hypothesis based on the (justified) assumption that somatic/psychological pathology has been adequately ruled out. ? The working hypothesis ‘MUS

2013 Dutch College of General Practitioners (NHG)

95. The medical assessment of bruising in suspected child maltreatment cases: A clinical perspective

The medical assessment of bruising in suspected child maltreatment cases: A clinical perspective Bruises commonly occur in children and are most often the result of a minor accidental injury. However, bruises can also signal an underlying medical illness or an inflicted injury (maltreatment). Although bruising is the most common manifestation of child physical maltreatment, knowing when to be concerned about maltreatment and how to assess bruises in this context can be challenging (...) for clinicians. Based on current literature and published recommendations, this practice point will help clinicians to distinguish between accidental and inflicted bruises, to evaluate and manage bruising in the context of suspected child maltreatment, and to evaluate for an underlying medical predisposition to bruising. Key Words: Bruise; Bruising; Child abuse; Children; Coagulopathy; Maltreatment  

2013 Canadian Paediatric Society

96. Low-Dose Aspirin Use for the Prevention of Morbidity and Mortality From Preeclampsia: Preventive Medication

American women, in order to have sufficient power to determine the effectiveness of different aspirin dosages and timing of initiation in these high-risk groups. Larger studies investigating aspirin use in the first or early second trimester may improve the evidence base on optimal timing of low-dose aspirin as preventive medication. Other areas of research include optimal therapies that individualize the aspirin dosage and timing of administration (e.g., morning vs. bedtime). In addition, studies (...) of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force at the time this recommendation was finalized are Michael L. LeFevre, MD, MSPH, Chair (University of Missouri School of Medicine, Columbia, Missouri); Albert L. Siu, MD, MSPH, Co-Vice Chair (Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, and James J. Peters Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Bronx, New York); Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo, PhD, MD, Co-Vice Chair (University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California); Linda Ciofu Baumann, PhD, RN (University

2014 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

97. Vitamin Supplementation to Prevent Cancer and CVD: Preventive Medication

, MSPH, Co-Vice Chair (University of Missouri School of Medicine, Columbia, Missouri); Albert L. Siu. MD, MSPH, Co-Vice Chair (Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, and James J. Peters Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Bronx, New York); Linda Ciofu Baumann, PhD, RN (University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin); Susan J. Curry, PhD (University of Iowa College of Public Health, Iowa City, Iowa); Mark Ebell, MD, MS (University of Georgia Athens, Georgia); Francisco A.R. García, MD, MPH (Pima County (...) Vitamin Supplementation to Prevent Cancer and CVD: Preventive Medication Recommendation | United States Preventive Services Taskforce Toggle navigation Main navigation Main navigation Recommendation to see the latest documents available. Recommendation Summary Population Recommendation Use of β-carotene or Vitamin E for Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease or Cancer The USPSTF recommends against the use of ß-carotene or vitamin E supplements for the prevention of cardiovascular disease

2014 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

98. Medical emergencies in adults overview

, consider cannulation for drug administration. Fluid Therapy NOTE: Special guidance applies in pregnant women (refer to speci?c guidelines in the obstetrics and gynaecological section). Current research shows little evidence to support the routine use of IV ?uids in adult acute blood loss. In circumstances such as penetrating chest and abdominal trauma, survival worsens with the routine use of IV ?uids. 2 Fluids may raise the blood pressure, cool the blood and dilute clotting factors, worsening (...) with a good physical examination, this format of history taking should ensure that you correctly identify those patients who are time critical, urgent or routine. The history taken must be fully documented. In many cases, a well-taken history will point to the diagnosis. The presence of “Medic Alert” type jewellery (bracelets or necklets) can provide information on the patient’s pre-existing health risk that may be relevant to the current medical emergency. SECONDARY SURVEY In NON-TIME CRITICAL conditions

2006 Joint Royal Colleges Ambulance Liaison Committee

99. Cardiac risk assessment before the use of stimulant medications in children and youth

, including peer-reviewed literature, data from the United States Food and Drug Administration Web site on reported adverse reactions in children using stimulant medication, and Health Canada data on the same problem. A consensus-based guideline on appropriate assessment is provided, based on input from members of the Canadian Paediatric Society, the Canadian Cardiovascular Society and the Canadian Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, with specific expertise and knowledge in the areas of both ADHD (...) and paediatric cardiology. The present statement advocates a thorough history and physical examination before starting stimulant medications, with an emphasis on the identification of risk factors for sudden death, but does not routinely recommend electrocardiographic screening or cardiac subspecialist consultation unless indicated by history or physical examination findings. A checklist for identifying children who are potentially at risk of sudden death (independent of ADHD or medications used to treat

2009 Canadian Paediatric Society

100. Statin Use for the Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in Adults: Preventive Medication

in this population will benefit from the intervention, so the decision to initiate use of low- to moderate-dose statins should reflect shared decision making that weighs the potential benefits and harms, the uncertainty about risk prediction, and individual patient preferences, including the acceptability of long-term use of daily medication. Suggestions for Practice Regarding the I Statement for Initiating Statin Therapy for Primary Prevention in Adults 76 Years and Older Potential Preventable Burden Adults 76 (...) . The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine, as part of the Choosing Wisely campaign, highlighted the use of cholesterol-lowering medications in adults with limited life expectancy (ie, 70 years and, most particularly, 85 years and older) among its "10 Things Physicians and Patients Should Question" because of the increased likelihood of an overall unfavorable risk-to-benefit ratio. Other Approaches to Prevention The USPSTF has made other recommendations relevant to the prevention of CVD

2016 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

Guidelines

Guidelines – filter by country