How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

2,912 results for

physical therapy

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

61. ASTRO's guideline on Palliative Radiation Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

ASTRO's guideline on Palliative Radiation Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Special Article Palliative thoracic radiation therapy for non- small cell lung cancer: 2018 Update of an American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Evidence-Based Guideline Benjamin Moeller MD, PhD a, ? , Ehsan H. Balagamwala MD b , Aileen Chen MD c , Kimberly M. Creach MD d , Giuseppe Giaccone MD, PhD e , Matthew Koshy MD f , Sandra Zaky MD, MS g , George Rodrigues MD, PhD, FASTRO h a Department of Radiation (...) Oncology Center, Turlock, California h Department of Radiation Oncology, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario, Canada Received 6 February 2018; accepted 19 February 2018 Abstract Purpose: To revise the recommendation on the use of concurrent chemotherapy (CC) with palliative thoracic external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) made in the original 2011 American Society for Radiation Oncology guideline on palliative thoracic radiation for lung cancer. Methods

2018 American Society for Radiation Oncology

62. Guidelines for the Provision and Assessment of Nutrition Support Therapy in the Pediatric Critically Ill Patient: Society of Critical Care Medicine and American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition

Guidelines for the Provision and Assessment of Nutrition Support Therapy in the Pediatric Critically Ill Patient: Society of Critical Care Medicine and American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition Guidelines for the Provision and Assessment of Nutrition Sup... : Pediatric Critical Care Medicine 1 mo and < 18 yr) critically ill patient expected to require a length of stay greater than 2 or 3 days in a PICU admitting medical, surgical, and cardiac patients. In total, 2,032 citations were (...) Medicine, to describe best practices in nutrition therapy in critically ill children. The target of these guidelines is intended to be the pediatric (> 1 mo and < 18 yr) critically ill patient expected to require a length of stay greater than 2 or 3 days in a PICU admitting medical, surgical, and cardiac patients. In total, 2,032 citations were scanned for relevance. The PubMed/Medline search resulted in 960 citations for clinical trials and 925 citations for cohort studies. The EMBASE search

2017 Society of Critical Care Medicine

63. Guidelines for the Provision and Assessment of Nutrition Support Therapy in the Pediatric Critically Ill Patient

reported ARDS, acute respiratory distress syndrome; BMR, basal metabolic rate; CRRT, continuous renal replacement therapy; DRI, Dietary Reference Intake; EN, enteral nutrition; FAO/WHO/UNU, Food Agriculture Organization / World Health Organization / United Nations University; IC, indirect calorimetry; IQR, interquartile range; MREE, measured resting energy expenditure; OR, odds ratio; PAL, physical activity level; PICU, pediatric intensive care unit; PN, parenteral nutrition; RQ, respiratory quotient (...) Guidelines for the Provision and Assessment of Nutrition Support Therapy in the Pediatric Critically Ill Patient Guidelines for the Provision and Assessment of Nutrition Support Therapy in the Pediatric Critically Ill Patient: Society of Critical Care Medicine and American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition - Mehta - 2017 - Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition - Wiley Online Library Search within Search term Search term The full text of this article hosted at iucr.org

2017 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition

64. Treating erectile dysfunction after radical radiotherapy and androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer

Treating erectile dysfunction after radical radiotherapy and androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer Treating erectile dysfunction after radical radiotherapy and androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer A quick guide for health professionals: supporting men with erectile dysfunction2 Treating erectile dysfunction after radical radiotherapy and androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer Introduction Radiotherapy and androgen deprivation therapy for prostate (...) was reached by reviewing the literature on erectile dysfunction (ED) and a survey of UK specialists in the management of treatment-induced ED. This information is for all health professionals involved in the management of patients with erectile dysfunction after radical radiotherapy and androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer.3 A quick guide for health professionals Key recommendations for an erectile dysfunction (ED) rehabilitation programme Pre-treatment recommendations • Discuss

2014 Prostate Cancer UK

65. AARC Clinical Practice Guideline: Effectiveness of Nonpharmacologic Airway Clearance Therapies in Hospitalized Patients

. The efficacy of the mucociliary esca- lator is impaired by aging, tobacco use, environmental exposures, and disorders such as bronchiectasis. 3-5 Neuro- degenerative conditions decrease the ability to cough ef- fectively, leading to secretion retention. 6-10 Airway clearance therapy (ACT), performed by respi- ratory therapists and other healthcare providers, is intended to aid secretion mobilization and expectoration, and to mitigate complications associated with secretion retention. ACT uses physical (...) or mechanical means to manipulate air flow, to mobilize secretions cephalad, and to facilitate evac- uation by coughing. 11 Breathing maneuvers, gravity as- sisted drainage, manual techniques, and mechanical de- vices can be used in an effort to facilitate secretion mobilization. Recommending, performing, and educating patients and families on ACT and secretion management are within the respiratory therapist’s scope of practice. This therapy is also within the practice of physical therapists, nurses

2013 American Association for Respiratory Care

66. ASGE Position Statement: endoscopic bariatric therapies in clinical practice

ASGE Position Statement: endoscopic bariatric therapies in clinical practice GIE POSITION STATEMENT ASGE position statement on endoscopic bariatric therapies in clinical practice Prepared by: ASGE BARIATRIC ENDOSCOPY TASK FORCE Shelby Sullivan, MD, 1 Nitin Kumar, MD, 2 Steven A. Edmundowicz, MD, FASGE, 1 Barham K. Abu Dayyeh, 3 SreenivasaS.Jonnalagadda,MD,FASGE, 4 MichaelLarsen,MD, 5 ChristopherC.Thompson,MD,MSc,FASGE 2 This document was reviewed and approved by the Governing Board (...) of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. The American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE), as well as a number of federal agencies and med- ical societies, recognizes obesity as a disease requiring pri- mary therapy. 1 In 2011, the ASGE and the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS) jointly published a white paper with the intent of providing a pathway for bringing endoscopic bariatric therapy (EBT) to clinical practice and Preservation and Incorporation

2015 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

67. Improving Adherence to Therapy and Clinical Outcomes While Containing Costs: Opportunities From the Greater Use of Generic Medications: Best Practice Advice From the Clinical Guidelines Committee of the American College of Physicians

Improving Adherence to Therapy and Clinical Outcomes While Containing Costs: Opportunities From the Greater Use of Generic Medications: Best Practice Advice From the Clinical Guidelines Committee of the American College of Physicians Opportunities From the Greater Use of Generic Medications | Annals of Internal Medicine | American College of Physicians '); } '); })(); Sign in below to access your subscription for full content INDIVIDUAL SIGN IN | You will be directed to acponline.org (...) to register and create your Annals account INSTITUTIONAL SIGN IN | | Subscribe to Annals of Internal Medicine . You will be directed to acponline.org to complete your purchase. Search Clinical Guidelines | 5 January 2016 Improving Adherence to Therapy and Clinical Outcomes While Containing Costs: Opportunities From the Greater Use of Generic Medications: Best Practice Advice From the Clinical Guidelines Committee of the American College of Physicians Free Niteesh K. Choudhry, MD, PhD; Thomas D. Denberg

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2015 American College of Physicians

68. Androgen Therapy in Women

Androgen Therapy in Women We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Androgen Therapy in Women: A Reappraisal: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline | The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism | Oxford Academic Search Account Menu Menu Navbar Search Filter Mobile Microsite Search Term Close search filter search input Article Navigation (...) Close mobile search navigation Article navigation 1 October 2014 Article Contents Article Navigation Androgen Therapy in Women: A Reappraisal: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline Margaret E. Wierman 1Department of Medicine (M.E.W.), University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 800452Veterans Affairs Research Service (M.E.W.), Denver, Colorado 80220 Search for other works by this author on: Wiebke Arlt 3Centre for Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism (W.A.), School

2014 The Endocrine Society

69. MASCC/ISOO Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Mucositis Secondary to Cancer Therapy

MASCC/ISOO Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Mucositis Secondary to Cancer Therapy MASCC=ISOO Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Mucositis Secondary to Cancer Therapy Rajesh V. Lalla, DDS, PhD 1 ; Joanne Bowen, PhD 2 ; Andrei Barasch, DMD, MDSc 3 ; Linda Elting, PhD 4 ; Joel Epstein, DMD, MSD 5 ; Dorothy M. Keefe, MD 2 ; Deborah B. McGuire, PhD, RN 6 ; Cesar Migliorati, DDS, MS, PhD 7 ; Ourania Nicolatou-Galitis, DDS, MSc, DrDent 8 ; Douglas E. Peterson, DMD (...) , PhD 1 ; Judith E. Raber-Durlacher, DDS, PhD 9 ; Stephen T. Sonis, DMD, DMSc 10 ; Sharon Elad, DMD, MSc 11 ; and The Mucositis Guidelines Leadership Group of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer and International Society of Oral Oncology (MASCC=ISOO). BACKGROUND: Mucositis is a highly significant, and sometimes dose-limiting, toxicity of cancer therapy. The goal of this system- atic review was to update the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer

2014 International Society for Oral Oncology

70. Long-term Cardiovascular Toxicity in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults Who Receive Cancer Therapy: Pathophysiology, Course, Monitoring, Management, Prevention, and Research Directions

Long-term Cardiovascular Toxicity in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults Who Receive Cancer Therapy: Pathophysiology, Course, Monitoring, Management, Prevention, and Research Directions Long-term Cardiovascular Toxicity in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults Who Receive Cancer Therapy: Pathophysiology, Course, Monitoring, Management, Prevention, and Research Directions | Circulation Search Hello Guest! Login to your account Email Password Keep me logged in Search March 2019 March 2019 (...) March 2019 March 2019 March 2019 February 2019 February 2019 February 2019 February 2019 January 2019 January 2019 January 2019 January 2019 January 2019 This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Free Access article Share on Jump to Free Access article Long-term Cardiovascular Toxicity in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults Who Receive Cancer Therapy: Pathophysiology, Course, Monitoring, Management, Prevention, and Research Directions

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2013 American Heart Association

71. The 2012 Hormone Therapy Position Statement of The North American Menopause Society

The 2012 Hormone Therapy Position Statement of The North American Menopause Society Menopause: The Journal of The North American Menopause Society Vol. 19, No. 3, pp. 257/271 DOI: 10.1097/gme.0b013e31824b970a * 2012 by The North American Menopause Society POSITION STATEMENT The 2012 Hormone Therapy Position Statement of The North American Menopause Society Abstract Objective: This position statement aimed to update the evidence-based position statement published by The North American Menopause (...) Society (NAMS) in 2010 regarding recommendations for hormone therapy (HT) for postmenopausal women. This updated position statement further distinguishes the emerging differences in the therapeutic benefit-risk ratio between estrogen therapy (ET) and combined estrogen-progestogen therapy (EPT) at various ages and time intervals since menopause onset. Methods: An Advisory Panel of expert clinicians and researchers in the field of women’s health was enlisted to review the 2010 NAMS position statement

2012 The North American Menopause Society

72. Recommendations for the Use of Nonpharmacologic and Pharmacologic Therapies in Osteoarthritis of the Hand, Hip, and Knee

or strengthening program or both. The TEP also strongly recommends that all patients with symptomatic knee OA who are overweight be counseled regarding weight loss (27). The TEP conditionally recommends that patients with knee OA should 1) participate in self-management pro- grams that may include psychosocial interventions, 2) use thermal agents and manual therapy in combination with exercise supervised by a physical therapist, 3) use medi- ally directed patellar taping, 4) participate in tai chi pro- grams (...) . The TEP strongly recommends that all patients with symptomatic hip OA who are overweight be counseled regarding weight loss. The TEP conditionally recommends that patients with hipOAshould1)participateinself-managementprograms that may include psychosocial interventions, 2) use ther- mal agents and manual therapy in combination with exer- cise supervised by a physical therapist, and 3) use walking aids, if necessary. Interventions for which data are avail- able only for knee OA and not hip OA were

2012 American College of Rheumatology

73. SNMMI Procedure Standard for Therapy of Thyroid Disease with 131I (Sodium Iodide) 3.0

in evaluating patients for therapy with 131 I (sodium iodide) for benign or malignant diseases of the thyroid gland, performing this treatment in a safe and ap- propriate manner, understanding and evaluating the se- quelae of therapy, and reporting the results of therapy. III. DEFINITIONS See also the SNM Guideline for General Imaging. 131 Iisab-emitting radionuclide with a physical half-life of 8.1 d; a principal g-ray of 364 keV; and a principal b-particlewithamaximumenergyof0.61MeV,anaverage (...) SNMMI Procedure Standard for Therapy of Thyroid Disease with 131I (Sodium Iodide) 3.0 The SNM Practice Guideline for Therapy of Thyroid Disease with 131 I 3.0* Edward B.Silberstein 1 (Chair),AbassAlavi 2 ,HelenaR.Balon 3 ,SusanE.M.Clarke 4 ,ChaitanyaDivgi 5 ,MichaelJ.Gelfand 6 , StanleyJ.Goldsmith 7 ,HosseinJadvar 8 ,CarolS.Marcus 9 ,William H.Martin 10 ,J.AnthonyParker 11 ,HenryD. Royal 12 , SalilD. Sarkar 13 ,Michael Stabin 14 ,and Alan D. Waxman 15 1 UC Health University Hospital, Cincinnati

2012 Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging

74. American College of Rheumatology Guidelines for Management of Gout Part 2: Therapy and Antiinflammatory Prophylaxis of Acute Gouty Arthritis

, the TFP voted to continue the prophylaxis for the greater of: 1) 6 months’ duration (evidence A) (51,53,54), 2) 3 months after achieving the target serum urate level for the patient without tophi detected on physical examination (evidence B), or 3) 6 months after achieving the target serum urate Figure 5. Pharmacologic antiin?ammatory prophylaxis of gout attacks and its relationship to pharmacologic urate-lowering therapy (ULT). The ?gure provides an algorithm for use of antiin?ammatory prophylaxis (...) agents to prevent acute gout attacks. The schematic highlights speci?c recommendations by the TFP on decision making on the initiation, options, and duration of prophylaxis relative to pharmacologic ULT therapy, relative to achievement of the treatment objectives of ULT. NSAIDs nonsteroidal antiin?ammatory drugs. ACR Guidelines for Gout Management: Part 2 1457level, where there has been resolution of tophi previously detected on physical examination (evidence C) (Figure 5). Discussion Acute attacks

2012 American College of Rheumatology

75. Palliative radiation therapy for bone metastases

Palliative radiation therapy for bone metastases Special Article Palliative radiation therapy for bone metastases: Update of an ASTRO Evidence-Based Guideline Stephen Lutz MD a, ? , Tracy Balboni MD MPH b , Joshua Jones MD c , Simon Lo MB ChB d , Joshua Petit MD e , Shayna E. Rich MD PhD f , Rebecca Wong MB ChB g , Carol Hahn MD h a DepartmentofRadiationOncology,EasternWoodsRadiationOncology,15990MedicalDriveSouth,Findlay,Ohio45840 b Department of Radiation Oncology, and Department (...) and multiple fractionregimensforbonemetastases.High-qualitydataconfirmsinglefractionradiationtherapymaybe deliveredtospinelesionswithacceptablelatetoxicity.Oneprospective,randomizedtrialconfirmsboth peripheralandspine-basedpainfulmetastasescanbesuccessfullyandsafelypalliatedwithretreatment for recurrence pain with adherence to published dosing constraints. Advanced radiation therapy techniquessuchasstereotacticbodyradiationtherapylackhigh-qualitydata,leadingthepaneltofavorits

2016 American Society for Radiation Oncology

76. AARC Clinical Practice Guideline: Effectiveness of Pharmacologic Airway Clearance Therapies in Hospitalized Patients

AARC Clinical Practice Guideline: Effectiveness of Pharmacologic Airway Clearance Therapies in Hospitalized Patients AARC Clinical Practice Guideline: Effectiveness of Pharmacologic Airway Clearance Therapies in Hospitalized Patients Shawna L Strickland PhD RRT-NPS ACCS AE-C FAARC, Bruce K Rubin MD MEngr MBA FAARC, Carl F Haas MLS RRT-ACCS FAARC, Teresa A Volsko MHHS RRT FAARC, Gail S Drescher MA RRT, and Catherine A O’Malley RRT-NPS (...) to the use of bronchodilators, mucolytics, mucokinetics, and novel therapy to promote airway clearance in these populations. Key words: airway clearance therapies; secretion clearance therapy; mucolytics; mucokinetics; heparin/N-acetylcysteine. [Respir Care 2015;60(7):1071–1077. ©2015 Daedalus Enterprises] Introduction The effectiveness of mucus clearance may be impaired by aging, tobacco use, environmental exposures, acute or chronic airway diseases, inhalation injury, and trauma. 1-3

2015 American Association for Respiratory Care

77. Clinical Practice Guideline for the Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Snoring with Oral Appliance Therapy: An Update for 2015

Clinical Practice Guideline for the Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Snoring with Oral Appliance Therapy: An Update for 2015 JCSM - Clinical Practice Guideline for the Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Snoring with Oral Appliance Therapy: An Update for 2015 Search article archive here ADVERTISEMENT Current Issue: Volume: 15 Number: 03 Issue Navigator Volume 11 No. 07 .695-696 Matt T. Bianchi, MD, PhD .697-698 Rakesh Bhattacharjee, MD .699-708 Scott B. Boyd, DDS, PhD 1 , 2 (...) ? and receive a subscription to JCSM with your membership Special Articles http://dx.doi.org/10.5664/jcsm.4858 Clinical Practice Guideline for the Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Snoring with Oral Appliance Therapy: An Update for 2015 Kannan Ramar, MBBS, MD 1 ; Leslie C. Dort, DDS 2 ; Sheri G. Katz, DDS 3 ; Christopher J. Lettieri, MD 4 ; Christopher G. Harrod, MS 5 ; Sherene M. Thomas, PhD 5 ; Ronald D. Chervin, MD 6 1 Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN; 2 University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada

2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine

78. Cervical Arterial Dissections and Association with Cervical Manipulative Therapy

Cervical Arterial Dissections and Association with Cervical Manipulative Therapy 3155 Purpose—Cervical artery dissections (CDs) are among the most common causes of stroke in young and middle-aged adults. The aim of this scientific statement is to review the current state of evidence on the diagnosis and management of CDs and their statistical association with cervical manipulative therapy (CMT). In some forms of CMT, a high or low amplitude thrust is applied to the cervical spine (...) files, and expert opinion to summarize existing evidence and to indicate gaps in current knowledge. Results—Patients with CD may present with unilateral headaches, posterior cervical pain, or cerebral or retinal ischemia (transient ischemic or strokes) attributable mainly to artery–artery embolism, CD cranial nerve palsies, oculosympathetic palsy, or pulsatile tinnitus. Diagnosis of CD depends on a thorough history, physical examination, and targeted ancillary investigations. Although the role

2014 Congress of Neurological Surgeons

79. Constraint Induced Movement Therapy (mCIMT), Pediatric Modified, plus Bimanual Training (BIT)

impairments, developmental non-use, mirror movements and impaired bilateral coordination (Eliasson 2005 [3a], Charles 2006 [5a]). Traditionally, patients with hemiplegia receive occupational therapy and physical therapy services to maximize their functional skills. Conventional treatment approaches often incorporate concepts from a variety of frames of references including biomechanical, developmental, neurodevelopmental, and rehabilitative (including compensatory) (Deluca 2006 [2b], Eliasson 2005 [3a (...) analysis Members of the Pediatric Constraint Induced Movement Therapy (mCIMT) Evidence Based Practice Team Division of Occupational Therapy and Physical Therapy Karen Harpster, PhD, OTR/L, Team Leader, Division of Occupational Therapy and Physical Therapy Kristen Brevoort, MOT, OTR/L, Division of Occupational Therapy and Physical Therapy Elaine Ralenkotter, OTR/L, Division of Occupational Therapy and Physical Therapy Sara-Ruth Strain-Riggs, DHS, MOT, OTR/L, Division of Occupational Therapy and Physical

2014 Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

80. Use of Biomarkers to Guide Decisions on Systemic Therapy for Women With Metastatic Breast Cancer

Use of Biomarkers to Guide Decisions on Systemic Therapy for Women With Metastatic Breast Cancer Use of Biomarkers to Guide Decisions on Systemic Therapy for Women With Metastatic Breast Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline | Journal of Clinical Oncology Search in: Menu Article Tools ASCO SPECIAL ARTICLES Article Tools OPTIONS & TOOLS COMPANION ARTICLES No companion articles ARTICLE CITATION DOI: 10.1200/JCO.2015.61.1459 Journal of Clinical Oncology (...) - published online before print July 20, 2015 PMID: Use of Biomarkers to Guide Decisions on Systemic Therapy for Women With Metastatic Breast Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline x Catherine Van Poznak , x Mark R. Somerfield , x Robert C. Bast , x Massimo Cristofanilli , x Matthew P. Goetz , x Ana M. Gonzalez-Angulo , x David G. Hicks , x Elizabeth G. Hill , x Minetta C. Liu , x Wanda Lucas , x Ingrid A. Mayer , x Robert G. Mennel , x William F. Symmans , x Daniel F

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2015 American Society of Clinical Oncology Guidelines

Guidelines

Guidelines – filter by country