How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

4,090 results for

physical therapy

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

2861. Conduct disorders in children and young people

with a conduct disorder. Physical or sexual abuse. Frequent changes in caregivers, or experience of early institutional living. Being rejected by parents or experiencing permissive, neglectful, harsh, or inconsistent parenting. Exposure to marital conflict and/or domestic violence. Family poverty. Risks outside the family Being bullied. Physical or sexual abuse. Involvement with other difficult young people. Use of recreational drugs. [ ; ; ] Prevalence How common is it? Conduct disorders and associated (...) behaviours such as: Children aged 3 to 7 years — general defiance of adults’ wishes, disobedience, angry outbursts with temper tantrums, physical aggression to other people (especially siblings and peers), destruction of property, arguing, blaming others for things that have gone wrong, annoying and provoking others. Children aged 8 to 11 years — may present with any of the above as well as swearing, lying, stealing outside the home, persistent rule breaking, physical fights, bullying other children

2018 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

2862. Fungal skin infection - scalp

parameters to compare drug efficacy, and came to the same conclusions [ ]. In addition, a Cochrane systematic review of two studies (n = 334) of confirmed Microsporum scalp infection in children, found moderate-quality evidence that the complete cure rate with 6 weeks of terbinafine treatment was lower than with 6–12 weeks of griseofulvin treatment [ ]. The recommendation on the duration of griseofulvin treatment is based on the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency's (MHRA) Summary (...) diagnosis and sufficient prescribing experience in primary care, or seeking specialist advice before initiating treatment. Co-prescribing a topical antifungal agent to reduce the risk of transmission to other people. Reviewing the person 4–8 weeks after completing the course of oral antifungal therapy to assess the response to treatment. If oral antifungal treatment is initiated in primary care, either oral griseofulvin (licensed) or oral terbinafine (off-label) should be prescribed empirically, until

2018 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

2863. Multimorbidity

to be at higher risk of adverse events and drug interactions. Consider that people may need a multimorbidity approach, if they : Find it difficult to manage their treatments or day-to-day activities. Receive care and support from multiple services and need additional services. Have both long-term physical and mental health conditions. Have frailty or are at risk of falls. Frequently seek unplanned or emergency care. Are prescribed 10–14 regular medicines, or are prescribed fewer than 10 regular medicines (...) of Internal Medicine. [ ] Kastner, M., et al (2019) Interventions for older people with multiple chronic diseases. Drugs and Therapeutics Bulletin. [ ] Primary evidence No new randomized controlled trials published in the major journals since 1 April 2018. New policies New policies No new national policies or guidelines since 1 April 2018. New safety alerts New safety alerts No new safety alerts since 1 April 2018. Changes in product availability Changes in product availability No changes in product

2018 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

2864. Shingles

(NICE) guideline Neuropathic pain in adults: pharmacological management in non-specialist settings . New sections have been added on prevalence, risk factors, and differential diagnosis. Minor amendments have been made to the prescribing information section on antiviral drugs. November 2016 — minor update. Clinical immunosuppression has been specifically highlighted as a contraindication to the administration of shingles vaccine in response to a Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (...) neuralgia [Chen, 2014]. The review found insufficient evidence from RCTs to ascertain whether this is also the case for other antiviral drugs. Previous changes Previous changes May 2018 — minor update. Eligible ages for the shingles vaccination has been updated in line with Public Health England (PHE) guidance. See the section on for more information. October 2017 — minor update. Seizure has been included as a possible adverse effect of famciclovir. January 2017 — minor update. Correction made to advice

2018 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

2865. Smoking cessation

2011 — minor update. Missing QOF indicators added. Issued in March 2011. October 2009 — minor update to include new information from the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) regarding varenicline and suicidal thoughts and behaviour, and regarding drug interactions with smoking cessation. Issued in October 2009. April 2009 — updated to include the indicators related to smoking cessation in the Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) of the General Medical Services (GMS) contract (...) What are the clinically significant drug interactions with cigarette smoking? [ ]. Asking about previous quit attempts Quit attempts should draw on experiences from previous attempts to stop and should bear in mind factors that contributed to previous relapses [ ]. Asking about current medication Most interactions between medicines and smoking are not clinically significant, but there are a small number of medicines that may need increased monitoring or dose adjustment when a person stops smoking

2018 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

2866. Sciatica (lumbar radiculopathy)

guideline group [ ]. Symptoms and signs of sciatica The information on the typical symptoms and signs of sciatica are based on a systematic review of drug treatments used in primary care for sciatica [ ], and expert opinion in the US clinical guideline Acute low back pain published by the University of Michigan Health System [ ], two British Medical Journal (BMJ) articles: Diagnosis and treatment of sciatica [ ] and Treating sciatica in the face of poor evidence (editorial) [ ], and in a narrative (...) , weak opiods, and neuropathic pain drugs. NICE recommends that people with sciatica are treated for neuropathic pain. The recommendation to first offer an NSAID and then a weak opioid with or without paracetamol, before progressing to a treatment for neuropathic pain is based on NICE guidance on the general treatment of lower back pain, and is considered by CKS to be good medical practice, largely due to the fact that many drugs used in the treatment of neuropathic pain have adverse effects, have

2018 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

2867. Multiple sclerosis

justified and transparently linked to the supporting evidence. Update Update New evidence New evidence Evidence-based guidelines Thompson, A. J., Baranzini, S. E., Geurts, J. (2018) Multiple sclerosis. The Lancet. [ ] ABPI (2018) Tysabri 300mg concentrate for solution for infusion. Electronic Medicines Compendium. [ ] Angelis, F., Nevin, J., Wallace, W. (2018) Disease-modifying therapies for multiple sclerosis. The British Medical Journal. [ ] HTAs (Health Technology Assessments) No new HTAs since 1 (...) a year. This is normally done in secondary care. As MS lesions can develop almost anywhere in the CNS, various complications may develop including: fatigue, spasticity, ataxia, tremor, mobility problems, visual problems, pain, bladder problems, sexual problems, and mental health problems. Various drug and non-drug therapies are used to help manage these complications. Have I got the right topic? Have I got the right topic? From age 18 years onwards. This CKS topic is largely based on a guideline

2018 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

2868. Alcohol - problem drinking

alcohol treatment. Statement 7. Families and carers of people who misuse alcohol have their own needs identified, including those associated with risk of harm, and are offered information and support. Statement 8. People needing medically assisted alcohol withdrawal are offered treatment within the setting most appropriate to their age, the severity of alcohol dependence, their social support and the presence of any physical or psychiatric comorbidities. Statement 9. People needing medically assisted (...) alcohol withdrawal receive medication using drug regimens appropriate to the setting in which the withdrawal is managed in accordance with NICE guidance. Statement 10. People with suspected, or at high risk of developing, Wernicke's encephalopathy are offered thiamine in accordance with NICE guidance. Statement 11. Adults who misuse alcohol are offered evidence-based psychological interventions, and those with alcohol dependence that is moderate or severe can in addition access relapse prevention

2018 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

2869. Asthma

, depending on the person's age, and the severity of their asthma symptoms, may include: An inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) at a low dose in adults/paediatric low dose in children. Add-on therapies, such as a leukotriene receptor antagonist, or a long-acting inhaled beta- 2 agonist, a maintenance and reliever therapy regimen, increased doses of ICS, theophylline, and/or a long-acting muscarinic agent. If symptoms are still not adequately controlled, consider referral to a specialist in respiratory medicine (...) the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency's guidance for medical practitioners, At a glance guide to the current medical standards of fitness to drive has been added. Issued in November 2010. September 2010 — minor update. The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency has issues a reminder to prescribers that, for most children, a daily dose of 24 micrograms formoterol is sufficient. Issued in September 2010. March 2010 — minor update. All strengths of Beclazone ® inhalers have been discontinued

2018 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

2870. Hypertension - not diabetic

a statin to people with hypertension has been deleted and links have been provided to the CKS topics on Lipid modification - CVD prevention and CVD risk assessment and management. The advice regarding the concurrent use of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) blocking drugs has been further clarified, based on an update to the Summary of Product Characteristics (SPC) for Tritace ® (ramipril). May 2015 — minor updates: The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) warning regarding (...) , At a glance guide to the current medical standards of fitness to drive has been added. Issued in October 2010. January 2010 — minor update. Advice regarding how to deal with abnormal urea and electrolyte results for people taking diuretics has been clarified. Issued in January 2010. December 2009 — minor update. Text added regarding potential drug interactions between antidepressants and alpha-blockers, beta-blockers, and calcium-channel blockers, in line with NICE guidance Depression in adults

2018 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

2871. Leg cramps

( 2017 ) SPC for quinine sulfate tablets BP 200 mg. Electronic Medicines Compendium. Datapharm Communications Ltd . [ ] Allen, R.E. and Kirby, K.A. ( 2012 ) Nocturnal leg cramps. American family physician 86 ( 4 ), 350 - 355 . [ ] Berger, D. ( 2014 ) Leg discomfort: beyond the joints. Medical clinics of North America 98 , 429 - 444 . [ ] BMJ Best Practice ( 2017 ) Muscle cramps. . BNF (2017) British National Formulary. 74th edn. London: British Medical Association and Royal Pharmaceutical Society (...) (rarely thigh); visible or palpable knotting or tightening of the muscle or abnormal posture; pain usually lasting seconds to less than 10 minutes; single muscle (or part of muscle) involvement; no abnormal findings on physical examination; good response to passive and active stretching; residual tenderness in the affected muscle; and causing sleep disruption. A history and examination may help exclude secondary causes (for example lower motor neuron problems, metabolic problems, medications

2018 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

2872. Eczema - atopic

such as homeopathic remedies, herbal medicine, massage, and food supplements (such as evening primrose oil) have not been adequately assessed in clinical trials. All therapies that claim effectiveness (including natural remedies) may also have adverse effects. Chinese herbal medicines have been associated with life-threatening adverse effects and have in some cases been contaminated with corticosteroids. If they insists on using complementary therapies, they should continue using the emollients frequently (...) . Systematic reviews and meta-analyses BMJ (2018) Severe and predominantly active atopic eczema in adulthood and long term risk of cardiovascular disease: population based cohort study. The British Medical Journal. [ ] Ramirez, F., Chen, S., Langan, S., et al. (2019) Association of atopic dermatitis with sleep quality in children. JAMA Pediatrics. [ ] Primary evidence NIHR Signal (2018) Adding emollients to the bath unlikely to help children with eczema. NIHR Signal. [ ] New policies New policies No new

2018 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

2873. Parkinson's disease

. Check adherence with anti-parkinsonian medication, including the correct doses and timings. Antiparkinsonian medicines should not be withdrawn abruptly to avoid the potential for acute akinesia or . Do not offer anticholinergic drug treatment to people who have developed dyskinesia and/or motor fluctuations. If motor symptoms or complications persist or are troublesome, liaise with the person's specialist team for advice on altering anti-parkinsonian medication, or arrange a specialist review (...) : The drug should be reduced or stopped if appropriate. Referral should not be delayed to assess the response. A person with confirmed Parkinson’s disease should be managed by a specialist multidisciplinary team including a Parkinson's disease nurse specialist who should monitor the person and help manage symptoms and complications. Primary care may be involved in the following: Onward referral to the multidisciplinary team, such as speech and language therapy, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, adult

2018 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

2874. Urticaria

classified as: Chronic spontaneous urticaria (previously called chronic idiopathic urticaria) — this has no identifiable external cause but may be aggravated by heat, stress, certain drugs, and infections. Autoimmune urticaria — characterized by the presence of immunoglobulin G (IgG) autoantibodies to the high-affinity receptor for IgE (Fc epsilon R1). Chronic inducible urticaria (CINDU, previously called physical urticaria) — occurs in response to a physical stimulus and can be further classified (...) chronic urticaria. Certain drugs (such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs]) can cause or aggravate chronic urticaria. Skin biopsy — if there is an unusual pattern of presentation or in cases of suspected urticarial vasculitis. Urinalysis — screening for haematuria and proteinuria will help to detect the presence of urinary tract infection and renal involvement in vasculitis. Physical challenge, for example: Cold-induced urticaria can usually be diagnosed by placing an ice cube in a sealed

2018 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

2875. ASCIA Clinical Update - Primary Immunodeficiencies (PID)

Deficiencies Foundation New Zealand (IDFNZ) – www.idfnz.org.au - HAE (Hereditary Angioedema) Australasia – www.haeaustralasia.org.au Specific therapies for PIDs The following therapies need to be individualised according to the type of PID: ? Prophylactic antibiotics, antifungals, antivirals ? Immunoglobulin replacement therapy (IRT) ? Immune modulatory drugs ? Gamma interferon ? Haemotopoetic stem cell transplant (HSCT) ? Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) ASCIA INFORMATION FOR HEALTH PROFESSIONALS 9 (...) may be administered at multiple possible sites according to patient preference. Usually the lower abdomen will be used. However, the outer edge of the thigh or back of the upper arm can also be used for SCIg infusions. The shaded areas below can be used for insertion of the needle. IVIg versus SCIg replacement therapy The choice of route (IVIg or SCIg) is dependent on multiple factors. Treatment is tailored to patient preference, medical conditions and lifestyle. The preferred route may vary

2017 Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy

2876. ASCIA Clinical Update - Allergic Rhinitis

and maintained for at least 4 weeks is recommended before considering referral to a specialist, if no improvement. If a patient is a competitive athlete, it is important to ensure medications suggested are permitted (e.g. pseudoephedrine used in some decongestants is subject to certain restrictions). Contact the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Agency (ASADA) or the New Zealand Anti-Doping Organisation for information. or Drug Free Sport New Zealand for information Non-sedating antihistamines Place in therapy 1 (...) controlled clinical studies in pregnant women examining the safety of many of the medications used in allergic rhinitis. Ideally drug therapy should be avoided in the first trimester of pregnancy. Saline nasal irrigation and intranasal chromones are safe in pregnancy. There are few oral antihistamines and intranasal corticosteroid sprays with an “A” category (e.g. used by large number of pregnant women without any proven increase in harmful effects on foetus). Nasal or oral decongestants

2017 Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy

2877. Integrating Tobacco Interventions into Daily Practice

, DFASAM Expert Panel Co-chair Professor, Departments of Family & Community Medicine and Psychiatry, and Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto Full Member, Institute of Medical Sciences, School of Graduate Studies, University of Toronto Director, Medical Education and Clinician Scientist Addictions Division, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) Toronto, Ontario Shelley Walkerley, NP-PHC, PhD Expert Panel Co-chair Assistant Professor, Nurse Practitioner Program (...) : Tobacco Intervention Resources List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Appendix H: Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence (Revised) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Appendix I: STOP Program: Sample Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT) Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Appendix J: Training Programs for Health-Care Providers

2017 Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario

2878. Developing and Sustaining Safe, Effective Staffing and Workload Practices

North Y ork, Ontario Hilda Swirsky, RN, BScN, MEd Registered Nurse Sinai Health System Toronto, Ontario Melissa Tawiah, BNSc, RN Registered Nurse Toronto General Hospital Mississauga, Ontario Kim Watson, RN, DPHN, MScN Holistic Practitioner: T.O.L. Services, Biofield Therapies: Reiki Master, HT, TT ER Trauma Nurse Windsor Regional Hospital Windsor, Ontario Christopher White, RN BScN, MSc Student Nurse University of Ottawa Ottawa, Ontario *Stakeholder reviewers are individuals who have expertise (...) and sustaining affordable access to high-quality, timely health care for Canadians and the quality of nurses’ work environments affects nurses’ physical and psychological health, patient outcomes, and the wider health system. There is an increasing need in the health-care environment for cost-effective measures that produce positive outcomes for patients, nurses, and health-care organizations alike (Joanna Briggs Institute, 2006), and various factors—including rising costs, pressures to increase productivity

2017 Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario

2879. Preventing Falls and Reducing Injury from Falls, Fourth Edition

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Appendix F: Summary of Findings — Approaches and Tools for Assessing Falls Risk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Appendix G: Interventions for Falls Prevention and Injury Reduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 Appendix H: Exercise and Physical Training Interventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Appendix I: Medication Resources (...) to be effective for preventing falls among older adults in the short term (Wang et al., 2015). Continence management Addressing incontinence as it relates to risk for falls One study within a review rated low quality found that a prompted voiding schedule in long-term care, together with physical activity, appeared to reduce falls (Batchelor, Dow, & Low, 2013). Medication management Actions to reduce, gradually withdraw, or discontinue medications associated with falling See Discussion of Evidence

2017 Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario

2880. Adult Asthma Care: Promoting Control of Asthma

-course” (Rootman & Gordon-El-Bihbety, 2008, p. 11). In several moderate to strong quality observational studies, low health literacy has been associated with poorer asthma self-management outcomes, such as medication behaviours and management (including poor adherence to controller therapy and incorrect inhaler device technique) (Federman et al., 2014; O’Conor et al., 2015), and with erroneous health beliefs (for example, the belief that one has asthma only when symptoms are present, or the belief (...) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Appendix J: Assessment Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 Appendix K: Device Technique Teaching Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 Appendix L: Respiratory Medications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 Appendix M: Peak Flow

2017 Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario

Guidelines

Guidelines – filter by country