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mental behavioral health

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1. Suicidal thoughts and behaviours and deliberate self-injury. Guidelines for providing mental health first aid to an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander person

Suicidal thoughts and behaviours and deliberate self-injury. Guidelines for providing mental health first aid to an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander person Purpose of these guidelines These guidelines describe how members of the public should provide first aid to an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander person who may be at risk of suicide or is suspected to be deliberately injuring themselves. The role of the first aider is to assist the person until appropriate professional help (...) . T ry to be familiar with their way of understanding. Also, the guidelines are designed to provide first aid in Australian Indigenous communities and may not be suitable for other cultural groups or for countries with different health systems. GUIDELINES FOR PROVIDING MENTAL HEALTH FIRST AID TO AN ABORIGINAL OR TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER PERSON SUICIDAL THOUGHTS & BEHAVIOURS AND DELIBERATE SELF-INJURY All MHFA guidelines can be downloaded from www.mhfa.com.au 1. Artwork by Charmaine SansburySUICIDAL

2008 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

2. Learning disabilities: Scenario: Behaviour that challenges and mental health problems

Learning disabilities: Scenario: Behaviour that challenges and mental health problems Scenario: Behaviour that challenges and mental health problems | Management | Learning disabilities | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Scenario: Behaviour that challenges and mental health problems Learning disabilities: Scenario: Behaviour that challenges and mental health problems Last revised in October 2018 Scenario: Behaviour that challenges and mental health problems From age 1 month onwards. How should I (...) manage 'behaviour that challenges' and/or a mental health problem? When managing a person with a learning disability, evaluate their to make decisions throughout assessment, care, and treatment on a decision-by-decision basis, and be mindful of their . Primary care practitioners should regularly review the communication needs of people with learning disabilities as they grow older to find out if they have changed. Be aware that 'behaviour that challenges' is not a diagnosis and may serve a purpose

2018 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

3. Service user experience in adult mental health: improving the experience of care for people using adult NHS mental health services

Service user experience in adult mental health: improving the experience of care for people using adult NHS mental health services (CG136) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 17 of 42give information about different treatment options, including drug and psychological treatments, and their side effects, to promote discussion and shared understanding offer support after the assessment, particularly (...) to the psychological, psychosocial and pharmacological interventions recommended for their mental health problem in NICE guidance. 1.4.9 Mental health services should work with local third sector, including voluntary, black and minority ethnic and other minority groups to jointly ensure that culturally appropriate psychological and psychosocial treatments, consistent with NICE guidance and delivered by competent practitioners, are provided to service users from these groups. 1.4.10 Mental health and social care

2011 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

4. No health without public mental health: The case for action

of prevalence, persistence and breadth of impact. 1 Mental illness is consistently associated with deprivation, low income, unemployment, poor education, poorer physical health and increased health-risk behaviour. Mental illness has not only a human and social cost, but also an economic one, with wider costs in England amounting to £105 billion a year. 2 Despite the impact of mental illness across a broad range of functional, economic and social outcomes, and despite ample evidence that good mental health (...) underlies all health, mental health is not prominent across public health actions and policy. Public health strategies concentrate on physical health and overlook the importance of both mental illness and mental well-being. Positioning mental health at the heart of public health policy is essential for the health and well-being of the nation. It will lead to healthy lifestyles and reduce health-risk behaviours, thereby both preventing physical illness and reducing the burden of mental illness. Most

2010 Royal College of Psychiatrists

5. Violence and aggression: short-term management in mental health, health and community settings

are offered appropriate psychological therapies, physical activities, leisure pursuits such as film clubs and reading or writing groups, and support for communication difficulties. Recognise possible teasing, bullying, unwanted physical or sexual contact or miscommunication between service users. Recognise how each service user's mental health problem might affect their behaviour (for example, their diagnosis, severity of illness, current symptoms and past history of violence or aggression). Anticipate (...) Introduction Violence and aggression refer to a range of behaviours or actions that can result in harm, hurt or injury to another person, regardless of whether the violence or aggression is physically or verbally expressed, physical harm is sustained or the intention is clear. Violence and aggression are relatively common and serious occurrences in health and social care settings. Between 2013 and 2014 there were 68,683 assaults reported against NHS staff in England: 69% in mental health or learning

2015 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

6. Management of Behavioural and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD)

in evaluating carer interventions. 28 REACH studies found that active engagement of carers with multifaceted interventions together with ongoing support reduced carer burden, depressive symptoms in carers and care recipients’ problem behaviour 29-32 . Marriott et al 33 found similar results. Furthermore structured carer training programs with follow-up and support services have shown to delay institutionalisation without compromising psychological health of carers. 34, 35 A meta-analysis by Brodaty et al 36 (...) Everywhere: The Toolkit (2012) 47 , Assessment and Management of People with Behavioural and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD) by NSW Health and Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists (RANZCP) 57 Reducing Behaviours Of Concern (ReBOC) by Alzheimer’s Australia, South Australia 58 , Management Strategies to address Behaviours of Concerns by Bendigo Health 59 and Walking in Another’s Shoes: Encouraging person-centred care through an experiential education program in New Zealand

2016 Australian and New Zealand Society for Geriatric Medicine

7. Cannabis and mental health management in primary care

treatment of the mental disorder may be associated with a reduction in cannabis use, although adjunctive psychological intervention is also likely to be required. Keywords: mental health; substance related disorders; general practice; cannabis Dan I Lubman Amanda Baker Cannabis and mental health Management in primary care Cannabis, derived from the plant Cannabis sativa, is the most widely used illicit drug in Australia. 1 Approximately one-third of the population have reported cannabis use at some time (...) • The Psychosis Screener 22 (six questions about lifetime psychotic symptoms) • The Kessler Psychological Distress Scale 23 (K10: 10 items measuring psychological distress indicating the likelihood of anxiety and/or depression) • The PsyCheck Screening T ool 24 (three components: general mental health history and treatment, a formal, structured suicide risk assessment, and a modified version of the World health organization developed self reporting questionnaire (sRQ) 25 which assesses current symptoms

2010 The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners

8. Trauma and loss. Guidelines for providing mental health first aid to an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander person

event, even if it was a very long time ago, unresolved emotional distress can still affect a person’s life. Some people may even become suicidal. If at any time, the person you are helping becomes suicidal, you should encourage them to seek professional help. For more information about assisting an Aboriginal person who is suicidal, please refer to the other guideline in this series Suicidal Thoughts & Behaviours and Deliberate Self-Injury: Providing Mental Health First Aid to an Aboriginal (...) : Providing Mental Health First Aid to an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander Person. THE GUIDELINES All MHFA guidelines can be downloaded from www.mhfa.com.au 3.any strong emotion expressed by the person, except if they become threatening, abusive or violent. Behaviours such as withdrawal, irritability and bad temper may be a response to the trauma or loss, so try not to take them personally. Respect the person’s need to be alone at times. Encourage the person to let others know when they need or want

2008 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

9. Managing the impact of violence on mental health, including among witnesses and those affected by homicide

injuries treated Given written and oral advice about mental health impact and support services a Identification b of mental health disorder Identification b of mental health disorder Minor emotional impact only – managed by Victim Support c or other competent agency Mild mental health disorder: refer to psychological well-being practitioner or primary care counsellor Major mental health disorder/significant risk: d refer to mental health team Evidence of mental health disorder: refer to general (...) Managing the impact of violence on mental health, including among witnesses and those affected by homicide Managing the impact of violence on mental health, including among witnesses and those affected by homicide Position Statement PS01/2012 July 2012 Royal College of Psychiatrists London Approved by Central Policy Committee: January 20122 http://www.rcpsych.ac.uk Authors Jonathan Shepherd Professor of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, and Director of the Violence and Society Research Group

2012 Royal College of Psychiatrists

10. Guidance for commissioners: service provision for Section 136 of the Mental Health Act 1983

be a minimum of two mental healthcare professionals immediately available to receive the individual from the police. If the unit is staffed by community staff, the local monitoring group must assure itself of their availability and of the required competences, including the ability to safely manage disturbed behaviour without police support. Consideration should be given to having dedicated Section 136 staff who can be assigned to other wards or teams when not required in the mental health place of safety (...) and Clinical Excellence (2005) Violence: The Short-term Management of Disturbed/Violent Behaviour in In-patient Psychiatric Settings and Emergency Departments (Clinical Guideline CG25). NICE. Royal College of Psychiatrists (2011) Standards on the Use of Section 136 of the Mental Health Act 1983 (England and Wales) (College Report CR159). Royal College of Psychiatrists. Welsh Assembly Government (2008) Mental Health Act 1983: Code of Practice for Wales. Welsh Assembly Government.

2015 Royal College of Psychiatrists

11. Workplace interventions for people with common mental health problems

• For people already experiencing common mental health problems at work, there was strong evidence from four studies demonstrating that, the most effective approach is brief (up to 8 weeks) of individual therapy, especially cognitive behavioural in nature (CBT). • The intervention seems to be effective whether delivered face-to-face or via computer-aided software, the latter finding being based on one study. The computer-aided software approach would ideally benefit from a corroborative study (...) with the stigma that surrounds mental health issues. Sensitivity to these issues is essential if employers and employees are to maintain a trusting relationship in difficult times. We have defined common mental health problems as those that:- • occur most frequently and are more prevalent; • are mostly successfully treated in primary rather than secondary care settings; • are least disabling in terms of stigmatising attitudes and discriminatory behaviour. What about stress? The term stress has in recent years

2005 Publication 1430

12. Emotional wellbeing and mental health of deaf children and young people

health problems in deaf children in UK. Historical data, cited in government research 3 , suggests that over 40% of deaf children experience mental health problems compared to over 25% of hearing children. 5.2. The National Deaf Children’s Society believes that deaf children experience a higher risk of psychological, behavioural and emotional problems. However, deafness in itself is not a risk factor for increased mental health difficulties: it is the consequence of being deaf in a hearing-orientated (...) Emotional wellbeing and mental health of deaf children and young people 1 of 7 Emotional well-being and mental health of deaf children and young people position statement Owner/s: Director Policy and Campaigns Author/s: Head of Policy and Research Issuing Team/Dept: Policy and Campaigns Version No: V1 Date Approved: ? EDs ? Committees ? Trustees 10 March 2017 N/A Review Frequency: 3 yearly Next Review Date: 2020/21 Circulation (primary location): Website Emotional well-being and mental health

2017 National Deaf Children's Society

13. Covid-19: Mental health resources for disability support service providers

it If you think you need more help to support someone with their mental health and wellbeing you could call or text 1737 to have a chat with a trained counsellor For specialist behaviour support, contact Explore Behaviour Support at healthcarenz.co.nz/explore- specialist-advice/ or call them on 0800 000 421. Useful online resources for supporting wellbeing Check out tips and messages designed to help Kiwis cope better and get through COVID-19 at: allright.org.nz/campaigns/getting-through-together Go (...) Covid-19: Mental health resources for disability support service providers Mental health resources for disability support service providers 11 May 2020 Stopping the spread of COVID-19 has meant that all New Zealander’s have had to live differently. This different way of living might be particularly challenging for the people you support. During different Alert Levels they may have had to live with people or be supported by workers that they don’t know. They also may have been unable to see

2020 Covid-19 Ad hoc guidelines

14. Mental Health Considerations during COVID-19 Outbreak

and strategies are in place for both workers and managers, and that managers can be a role-model of self-care strategies to mitigate stress. 15. Orient responders, including nurses, ambulance drivers, volunteers, case identifiers, teachers and community leaders and workers in quarantine sites, on how to provide basic emotional and practical support to affected people using psychological first aid 16. Manage urgent mental health and neurological complaints (e.g. delirium, psychosis, severe anxiety (...) Mental Health Considerations during COVID-19 Outbreak 1 Mental Health and Psychosocial Considerations During COVID-19 Outbreak 12 March 2020 In January 2020 the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the outbreak of a new coronavirus disease to be a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. WHO stated there is a high risk of the 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) spreading to other countries around the world. In March 2020, WHO made the assessment that COVID-19 can be characterized

2020 WHO Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) Pandemic

15. Guideline for concussion/mild traumatic brain injury & persistent symptoms - Mental Health Disorders

of self-report questionnaires, and behavioral observation. Non-Pharmacological Treatment of Mental Health Disorders New Key Section Level of evidence A B C Updated Evidence 8.2 C If a mental health disorder is determined to be present, then the treatment of the emotional/behavioural symptoms should be based upon individual factors, patient preference, symptom severity and comorbidity, and existing practice guidelines for the treatment of the diagnosed condition (e.g., depression, anxiety, PTSD (...) can influence related mental health disorders. In the case of mTBI, biologically the individual may suffer an insult to the brain and injuries to the body (e.g., whiplash injuries, etc.), with consequences to their experience of pain and ability to sleep, which can further cause changes in the neurobiology of the brain. At the psychological level they may experience acute stress due to their experience of trauma or injury, as well as in response to the consequences to their functional abilities

2018 Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation

16. Mental Health in the Emergency Department

in a positive way to the patient’s condition. It is a key element of liaison teams that they should also engage in education of ED staff (see PLAN standards). Including mental health topics within junior doctor teaching programmes (e.g. the management of disturbed behaviour, the MHA and MCA, and other clinically relevant, curriculum-based topics) is also beneficial. Curriculum links for EM juniors: • CAP4 Aggressive/disturbed behaviour • CAP8 Confusion, acute/delirium • CAP30 Mental Health • HAP3 Alcohol (...) behavioural disturbance guideline • NICE guideline on short term management of violence and aggression • Example of ED Rapid Tranquilisation guideline Mental Health in EDs – Toolkit (Revised October 2019) Page 13 Section 6 – Multidisciplinary services Mental health patients in the acute trust have a high rate of co-morbidities with alcohol, substance misuse and other vulnerabilities. Close links with safeguarding also promote good holistic care. Therefore, to provide a patient-centred service there must

2019 Royal College of Emergency Medicine

17. Mental health of adults in contact with the criminal justice system

into practice 31 Context 33 More information 34 Recommendations for research 35 1 Psychological and pharmacological interventions for people with paraphilic disorders 35 2 Structured clinical management interventions in probation service providers 36 3 Interventions for coordination and delivery of care to improve access and uptake 36 4 T ools for case identification for cognitive impairment in criminal justice system populations 37 5 Prevalence of mental health problems 38 6 Identification of factors (...) using the Correctional Mental Health Screen for Men (CMHS-M) or Mental health of adults in contact with the criminal justice system (NG66) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 14 of 39Women (CMHS-W) to identify possible mental health problems if: the person's history, presentation or behaviour suggest they may have a mental health problem the person's responses to the first-stage health assessment suggest

2017 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

18. Coexisting severe mental illness and substance misuse: community health and social care services

NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 10 of 60pregnancy and childcare responsibilities. 1.3.3 Consider covering behaviours in the care plan that may affect the person's physical or mental health, in addition to their substance misuse (see NICE's pathways on drug misuse and alcohol-use disorders). Pay particular attention to: diet (see the NICE pathway on diet) physical activity (see the NICE pathway (...) . Ensure staff can meet their needs. Adapting e Adapting existing secondary care mental health services xisting secondary care mental health services 1.5.6 Adapt existing specialist services to meet both a person's coexisting severe mental illness and substance misuse needs and their wider health and social care needs. Do not create a specialist 'dual diagnosis' service. 1.5.7 Offer interventions that aim to improve engagement with all services, support harm reduction, change behaviour and prevent

2016 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

19. Mental health care in the perinatal period: Australian clinical practice guideline

mental health conditions • psychological approaches to prevention and treatment of depressive and anxiety disorders • prescribing in pregnant and breastfeeding women, in terms of potential risks (harm to fetus/infant) and benefits • potential areas for future development to support the sustainable and measurable implementation of best practice. The Guideline does not cover: • the diagnosis or specifics of managing mental health conditions in the perinatal period • routine assessment of specific (...) of a woman’s physical and mental health should be central to every aspect of maternity care. As well as affecting a woman’s emotional welfare and happiness, mental health conditions affect her experience of pregnancy and parenting, are associated with a degree of increased risk of obstetric and neonatal complications and can profoundly affect a woman’s ability to bond with her baby and the infant’s psychological adaptation over the longer term. Fetal exposure to an untreated maternal mental health

2018 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

20. Guidelines for Psychological Practice in Health Care Delivery Systems

traditional psychological services in health care deliv- ery systems, such as mental status examinations, emer- gency evaluation and triage, diagnostic evaluation and assessment, and psychotherapy. However, psychologists increasingly perform other services within multidisci- plinary teams in health promotion and disease prevention programs, primary care, behavioral medicine (or mind– body medicine) programs, care of patients with acute and chronic medical conditions, and end-of-life care. Application (...) —with either contractual arrange- ments or following their patients as they enter a health care delivery system. In all cases, psychologists have special ex- pertise in communication, behavioral issues, patient decision making, human interaction and systems that is relevant to the full spectrum of health and mental health issues and settings; these guidelines apply to that full spectrum. It is recognized that there is rapid growth in the use of technology (in areas This article was published Online First

2013 American Psychological Association

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